WINDOW DRAPERY TREATMENT. DRAPERY TREATMENT

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Window Drapery Treatment


window drapery treatment
    treatment
  • The manner in which someone behaves toward or deals with someone or something
  • a manner of dealing with something artistically; "his treatment of space borrows from Italian architecture"
  • Medical care given to a patient for an illness or injury
  • the management of someone or something; "the handling of prisoners"; "the treatment of water sewage"; "the right to equal treatment in the criminal justice system"
  • A session of medical care or the administration of a dose of medicine
  • care provided to improve a situation (especially medical procedures or applications that are intended to relieve illness or injury)
    drapery
  • Drapery is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French drap, from Late Latin drappus ). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes - such as around windows - or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers.
  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
  • curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
    window
  • a transparent panel (as of an envelope) inserted in an otherwise opaque material
  • a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
  • a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened
  • An opening in a wall or screen through which customers are served in a bank, ticket office, or similar building
  • A pane of glass filling such an opening
  • An opening in the wall or roof of a building or vehicle that is fitted with glass or other transparent material in a frame to admit light or air and allow people to see out
window drapery treatment - In Treatment:
In Treatment: The Complete Third Season
In Treatment: The Complete Third Season
Set within the highly charged confines of individual psychotherapy sessions, In Treatment: The Complete Third Season continues to center around Dr. Paul Weston (Gabriel Byrne) who continues to cope with the after-effects of his recent divorce, as well as his move to Brooklyn to continue his practice. In the midst of new emotional and physical challenges (including hand tremors he fears might be the onset of Parkinson’s Disease, which killed his father), Paul will be treating three new patients (Debra Winger, Irrfan Khan, and Dane DeHaan), and will see a new therapist (Amy Ryan) in New York City.

Rumors of In Treatment's death have been greatly exaggerated. The half-hour HBO drama that was originally adapted from an Israeli TV show has continued to flourish among devoted fans in spite of wide-ranging critical opinion about its integrity and entertainment value. Nevertheless, season three is an absorbing continuation of the life and practice of psychotherapist Paul Weston (Gabriel Byrne), and the tortured processes he undertakes with patients and with himself. Continuing the format of episodes that focus on individual patients--only three this time--then concluding each week with his own therapy session, season three is the first based on original scripts rather than adaptations of episodes from the hit Israeli series Be' Tipul. The new show runners, Anya Epstein and Dan Futterman, follow the previous design in assigning the same writer to script for each patient. The only other major thematic difference is the absence of Dianne Wiest, whose Emmy-winning performance as Paul's mentor, supervisor, and therapist was the highlight of seasons one and two. Fortunately her replacement, Amy Ryan, is as capable an actor and strong a foil to give Paul's panoply of problems a whole new arena for discussion (TV vets Epstein and Futterman were responsible for writing the Amy Ryan "Adele" scripts).
Anyone who has experienced the psychotherapeutic process cannot help but be instantly drawn in to the show's eloquent design of talk-and-listen, as secrets are told or held back, fears and desires explored or repressed. Even those who are perfectly adjusted and scoff at the value of psychological treatment should be fascinated by the twists and turns that mostly seem entirely naturalistic, and better yet, unexpected. The 50-minute hour that is shortened to 20-something for dramatic purposes may sometimes play against the realistic portrayal of the professional dynamic, but after all, this isn't reality. Even so, the episodes crackle in their basic form as one-act plays that thrive on nothing but two people trading razor-sharp dialogue about who they are and what they're thinking. Paul is still listening, and he's entirely engaged. The flow of each session reflects the depth of his perception as he leads himself and his patient back to points, gestures, and remarks that may have been made in passing, yet which represent the basic spectacle of the therapeutic process and the essential role the therapist has in that relationship. We understand that what goes on in his office affects him as much as his patients.
That's where Amy Ryan comes in as the young, brilliant psychiatrist who Paul sees at the end of each week to bare his own tortured soul. He's still terribly depressed. His ex-wife is remarrying, he's plagued with guilt over his 12-year-old son, and he has terrorized himself into believing that he's becoming his father, even to the point of being convinced that he'll die of the same disease (Parkinson's). At first Ryan comes off as the perfect psychiatric ice queen. But as their connection deepens with knowledge, insight, transference, counter-transference, and enthralling exchanges of actorly acrobatics (their butts never leave their seats!), she becomes perhaps the show's most compelling character. She's in great company with Debra Winger as a patient who plays an aging actress (though decidedly not typecast) who finds work elusive and is facing some ordinary family struggles as well. Not only does she look terrific, Winger brings the best game she has to her sparring-match scenes with Byrne. As an anguished gay teen, Dane DeHaan is the weakest character. He's saddled with annoying sexual and adolescent stereotypes that seem to be thrown into the show's mix just for a proper portrayal of patient demographics. Best of all is the Indian actor Irrfan Khan (known primarily in the United States for The Namesake and Slumdog Millionaire) as a maladjusted immigrant whose inscrutable nature fascinates Paul. As the most glaring example of how Paul's relationships with his patients sometimes slip into the inappropriate, the two become friends of sorts, even into the ultimate and unforeseen conclusion of this sensational seasonal thread. In all, In Treatment continues to be an engrossing dramatization of psychotherapy, made human by excellent writing and gripping characterizations. --Ted Fry

80% (10)
window treatment
window treatment
Panel window treatments with black table in center and floral centerpiece, diamond tiled floor pattern.
After Study Custom Window Treatment
After Study Custom Window Treatment
This custom window treatment was designed using silks, suede, tapestry and tassels.

window drapery treatment
window drapery treatment
Writing Treatments That Sell: How to Create and Market Your Story Ideas to the Motion Picture and TV Industry, Second Edition
A fully revised guide to turning your movie idea into a treatment that can persuade even the most jaded movie producers

As Hollywood insiders know, the first step in selling your story idea for film or television is preparing a treatment, the brief pitch that sells the concept to a busy producer or agent. Now including updates on the latest trends in the industry, writers-producers Kenneth Atchity and Chi-Li Wong tell readers everything they need to know to create an effective and saleable treatment, one that incorporates such key elements as conflict, likeable characters, plot twists, a climax, and visual drama.
Using dozens of the latest examples from actual productions, Writing Treatments That Sell distinguishes between scripts designed for feature films, episodic television, and made-for-TV movies, and shows step-by-step how to prepare a selling treatment for each. Also included is essential information on copyrighting and acquiring rights along with a comprehensive glossary of industry terms. This book is essential for anyone hoping to get a foot in the door of the exciting scriptwriting business.

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