BEST CONSERVATORY BLINDS. CONSERVATORY BLINDS

BEST CONSERVATORY BLINDS. SWAG DRAPERIES.

Best Conservatory Blinds


best conservatory blinds
    conservatory blinds
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
best conservatory blinds - Wallpaper Brewster
Wallpaper Brewster Komar photomurals Vol 8 Conservatory 4 panels 4063
Wallpaper Brewster Komar photomurals Vol 8 Conservatory 4 panels 4063
Wallpaper Brewster Parkview Designs Komar photomurals Vol 8 Scene Mural Conservatory 4 panels 4063. Keywords are murals, mural, photos, wall mural, plants, flower, flowers, chairs, patio mural, patio murals, GRD, FLW. Colors are Black, Dark Gray, Green, Hunter Green, Light Blue, Lime, Medium Gray. Alternate color patterns are . Coordinating patterns are . Product Details: washable Material: Vinyl. Product Information: Book name: Komar photomurals Vol 8 Pattern name: Conservatory 4 panels Pattern #: 4063

75% (10)
Pierre Blanchar
Pierre Blanchar
French postcard by Editions P.I., Paris, nr. 9. French actor Pierre Blanchar (1892-1963) was one of France's most popular show business personalities. He made many memorable stage appearances and appeared in 54 films. He often played characters who were complex and tortured. During the war he also worked as a film director. Gustave Pierre Blanchard was born in 1892, in Philippeville, Algeria (now Skikda, Algeria). He learned his craft at the Paris Conservatory, and made the first of many memorable stage appearances in 1919 (some sources say 1920). In 1922 he made his film debut in the silent film Jocelyn (1922, Leon Poirier). Many leading roles followed in silent films like Papa bon c?ur/Papa Goodheart (1922, Henry Krauss), Genevieve (1923, Leon Poirier), Aux jardins de Murcie/Heritage (1923, Rene Hervil, Louis Mercanton), La Terre promise/Promised Land (1925, Henry Roussel) with Raquel Meller, Le Joueur d'echecs/The Chess Player (1927, Raymond Bernard), Le Capitaine Fracasse/Captain Fracasse (1929, Alberto Cavalcanti, Henry Wulschleger) with the young Charles Boyer, and the German production Diane - Die geschichte einer Pariserin/Diane, the Story of a Paris Woman (1929, Erich Waschneck) starring Olga Tschechowa. He often choose characters which were complex and tortured, like Adjudant Gilbert Demachy in the war drama Les Croix de bois/The Wooden Crosses (1932, Raymond Bernard), Captain de Saint-Avit in the classic L'Atlantide (1932, Georg Wilhelm Pabst) opposite Brigitte Helm, or Raskolnikov in Crime et chatiment/Crime and Punishment (1935, Pierre Chenal). At the film festival of Venice he was awarded the Volpi Cup as Best Actor for this role. Pierre Blanchar was the archetypical romantic and gloomy hero, but he did not neglect comedies, like Amants et voleurs/Lovers and Thieves (1935, Raymond Bernard) with Arletty and Michel Simon, and Le Coupable (1937, Raymond Bernard) with Madeleine Ozeray. Other classic films of the 1930’s were L’homme de nulle part/The Late Mathias Pascal (1937, Pierre Chanal) with Isa Miranda, Mademoiselle Docteur (1937, Georg Wilhelm Pabst) with Dita Parlo, Un carnet de bal/Dance Program (1937, Julien Duvivier) with Marie Bell, the Alexander Pushkin adaptation La Dame de pique/Queen of Spades (1937, Fyodor Otsep), L'Affaire du courrier de Lyon (1937, Claude Autant-Lara, Maurice Lehmann), L'Homme de nulle part/Courier of Lyons (1937, Pierre Chenal) with Dita Parlo, and L'Etrange Monsieur Victor/Strange M. Victor (1938, Jean Gremillon) starring Raimu. One of Blanchar's most famous screen characterizations was Napoleon in the British A Royal Divorce (1938, Jack Raymond) with Ruth Chatterton as Josephine de Beauharnais. Before and during the Second World War Pierre Blanchar was often requested for the French-German productions by Union France-Allemagne. During the occupation of France he starred in L'Empreinte du Dieu/Two Women (1940, Leonide Moguy), the never completed La Priere aux etoiles/The Prayer to the Stars (1941, Marcel Pagnol), and Pontcarral, colonel d'empire/Piontcarral, Colonel of the Empire (1942, Jean Delannoy). He also directed two films for them Secrets (1942) and Un seul amour/One Love (1943) with Micheline Presele and Gaby Andre. Later he recordedly became a member of the resistance and in August 1944 he commented vibrantly the images of the liberation of Paris in the cinema newsreels. After the war he was highly praised for his touching performance in La Symphonie pastorale (1946, Jean Delannoy) as a minister who falls in love with a blind girl (Michele Morgan). This success soon was followed by roles in Patrie/Homeland (1946, Louis Daquin), and Apres l'amour/After the Love (1948, Maurice Tourneur). Another special role was Captain Ferane in the film Le Bataillon du ciel/They Are Not Angels (1947, Alexander Esway), based on the novel by Joseph Kessel. This role was inspired on the life and death of Pierre Marienne (1908-1944), one of the forces behind the liberation of France. As Lieutenant Paratrooper of the fourth bataillon of the Special Air Service (S.A.S.) of the Free French Forces he was parachuted in Bretagne on 5 June 1944 in the frame of D-Day. After taking part in the battle of Saint Marcel on 18 June 1944, he was assassinated in the Morhiban by the French army on 12 July 1944. Blanchar had known Pierre Marienne who had worked in the pre-war cinema. He also resembled Pierre Marienne physically. Pierre Blanchar’s film career slowed down in the 1950’s. After the title role of the comedy Mon ami Sainfoin/My Friend Sainfoin (1950, Marc-Gilbert Sauvajon) there was a long interval till 1959. That year he played supporting roles in Du rififi chez les femmes/Rififi and the Women (1959, Alex Joffe) with Nadja Tiller, and the fairytale Katia/Magnificent Sinner (1959, Robert Siodmak) with Romy Schneider. His last film, Le Monocle noir/The Black Monocle (1961, Georges Lautner), was shot at the chateau de Josselin in the Morbihan. Pierre Blanchar di
Peppers.....
Peppers.....
Taken for Active Assignment Weekly:: Complementary Colours WIT: This shot was taken from the house looking out into our conservatory. I put a white sheet over a table and set the peppers up. The background was a set of white vertical blinds that are hanging in our windows. Camera on tripod set at 1/200 and f13. Used flash mounted on the camera (with a plastic diffusion cap) to add some light as it was quite an overcast day. Set the camera to use self-timer, and then just ran around to the back of the table. Took me about 20 goes to get one that I liked. Post processed RAW image using iPhoto. Adjusted right end of histogram to lighten everything and also increased exposure to 'blow-out' the blinds so that you can't see them. Boosted saturation a little to stop it looking too overexposed and to bring out the colours in the peppers. Finally used the 'retouch' tool to reduce some of the wrinkles on my forehead! (OMG - Do I really look that old....?)

best conservatory blinds
Comments