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how to use windows blinds
    windows blinds
  • WindowBlinds is a computer program that allows users to skin the Windows graphical user interface. It has been developed by Stardock since 1998, and is the most popular component of their flagship software suite, Object Desktop.
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Johari's Window
Johari's Window
Johari’s window is a concept used in psychology to explain knowledge in interpersonal relationships. It's named after its inventors, Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham. Often portrayed as a diagram in a two-by-two square shape - but here, of course, illustrated with a photo! - it depicts the four possible combinations of what is known and unknown to self and other. Let’s take a look at how Johari’s window applies to situations in which you share your photograph with others. We’ll start with the upper left window pane. 1. Known to Self / Known to Other Let’s say when other people see your photo, they offer comments about it. Maybe they say something about its subject matter, its visual qualities, the techniques used to create it, or an idea being expressed. If you nod your head in agreement, because you’re aware of these things and probably intended them, then this is the first pane of Johari’s window: things about the image that are known to self and other. Psychologists call this the "open" quadrant. Most of the time this will be a satisfying experience. You created the photo with a specific purpose in mind and people acknowledge it. That’s what sharing photographs is all about: successful communication. The more you share photos with others, the bigger this quadrant gets. 2. Known to Self / Unknown to Other If we slide over to the pane on the top right, we run into a situation that usually isn’t so rewarding. People aren’t aware of the idea you’re trying to express in the image. They don’t notice the techniques you used. They just don’t get it and you perhaps end up feeling unappreciated, frustrated, and misunderstood – especially if you were attempting to express some personal thought or feeling in the image. What then? Well, you might conclude that your image did not succeed in its attempt to communicate, so you go back to the drawing board and try again. Or you explain the photo. As they say in interpersonal psychology, you might even “self-disclose” to help people understand the personal thought or feeling that you were trying to convey. If that works and they now get it, you successfully managed to slide back over to the first pane. Sometimes people actually may be aware of your purpose and efforts in creating the photo, but they just don’t say anything about it. In that case a little bit of inquiry on your part will help you realize that you’re really in a Pane #1 situation – although it sure would be nice for people to acknowledge what they understand without your having to probe to find out. In other situations people may not realize something about the image and you deliberately don't tell them. Maybe there's something personal about the photo that you would rather not disclose, or maybe it involves one of your photography secrets. That's why psychologists sometimes call this the "hidden" quadrant. 3. Unknown to Self / Known to Other Let’s move on to the lower left pane. This is where things start to get interesting - in this "blind" quadrant. People detect aspects of your photo that you hadn’t noticed yourself, sometimes even when you had put a lot of thought and effort into creating the image! If the person points out a flaw, that might be a bit upsetting, as when you didn’t notice the telephone wire extending out of the subject’s ear. It’s a reminder of how your eye can develop blind spots. On the other hand, people may point out something admirable about the image, that you hadn’t considered yourself. Maybe it’s something about the composition or the idea being expressed. Images can be so subtle and complex that you can’t notice everything. Sometimes you even fail to recognize or overlook an important feature that made it a good shot! Lightbulbs really start popping over your head when psychologically astute people perceive something about your personality or lifestyle in the photo even though you had not intended to reveal it. In interpersonal psychology they would say that the other person’s “feedback” triggered an insight for you. With that insight you have now moved back to Pane #1, while on the way feeling an empathic connection with that person. This is one of the outcomes of sharing photographs that can be quite fascinating, although sometimes a bit intimidating too. We don’t always realize the unconscious forces that shape our photography. If we take other people's point of view, the situation might be tricky for them as well. Would you point out something about an image when it's clear that the photographer doesn't realize it? How do you do that? 4. Unknown to Self / Unknown to Other The last pane in Johari’s window, on the bottom right, is the most elusive. It's the "unknown" quadrant. Is there something important about your photograph that neither you nor the other person recognize? Perhaps both of you haven’t taken the time or don’t have the eye to notice something subtle about the concept, composition, or technique.
Blinded by the lights
Blinded by the lights
A (sur)realistic depiction of post-communist Romania. Communist blocks of flats, crammed with people. Eight to twelve square meters per family member used to be called a reasonable space allocation when these apartments were made. Shiney new McDonalds with drive-in attached, they were among the first to arrive after the communists fell. People didn't know how to deal with them, the venue was more expensive than our regular fast foods of the time. The junk food looked fancy, cannot say much about the taste... And burgers were definitely tiny, compared to the huge ones in the US. No refills on drinks either, nowhere in Eastern Europe for that matter. Romanians would definitely abuse with the refilling. And they would queue up for anything that comes for free, no matter what it is. The nation is hungry and poor after 55 years of totalitarian dictatorship, degrading and dehumanising us to the worst possible levels. Somehow the Romanian flag between the two McDonalds flags seems a bit ironic to me. It looks much like flanked, or propped, even, by MickeyD. Still, it's probably also part of the "conversion process". 15 seconds exposure, from the driver's seat, with the camera resting in the car's open window. (The car was parked, of course :D)

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