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Small English Wheel


small english wheel
    english wheel
  • The English Wheel, also known as a wheeling machine in Britain, is typically a manually operated metalworking apparatus, that allows a craftsman to form smooth, compound curves from flat sheets of metal, such as aluminum or mild steel.
    small
  • on a small scale; "think small"
  • Small items of clothing, esp. underwear
  • limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"
  • the slender part of the back
small english wheel - IOGEAR Multimedia
IOGEAR Multimedia Keyboard with Laser Trackball and Scroll Wheel, 2.4GHz Wireless GKM561R (Black)
IOGEAR Multimedia Keyboard with Laser Trackball and Scroll Wheel, 2.4GHz Wireless GKM561R (Black)
IOGear GKM561R 2.4GHz Multimedia Keyboard with Laser Trackball and Scroll Wheel you can enjoy the freedom of wireless connectivity with IOGEAR's slim and ergonomic wireless 2.4 GHz keyboard with built-in laser trackball. The 2.4 GHz wireless keyboard and laser trackball combo allows you to work up to 33 feet away from your computer. It's the ideal solution for the living room home entertainment and computer enthusiast; also a perfect solution for meeting room presentation needs. Great for HTPC (Home Theater PC's) setups or MCE (Windows Media Center) applications. The ultra-slim, and low profile keyboard lets you type with style and comfort from any angle in the room. In addition to its creative design it has built-in left and right mouse buttons with a scroll wheel and uses the latest laser trackball technology. This enables you to control the mouse cursor speed from 400 dpi, 800 dpi or at a lightning speed of 1200 dpi. An inclusive, ergonomic, smooth and superb wireless solution for your home electronics lifestyle. The 2.4 GHz technology is WiFi and Bluetooth friendly and is able to perform frequency hopping to avoid interference with other devices. Media Center hot keys only support Windows XP MCE and Vista Premium editions. Devices must have HID Support (USB Keyboard / Mouse Support) in order to obtain keyboard functionality.

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AC Cobra
AC Cobra
Motorcla?ssico, Lisbon, Portugal History and development Like many British specialist manufacturers, AC Cars had been using the smooth, refined Bristol straight-6 engine in its small-volume production, including its AC Ace 2-seater roadster. This had a hand built body with a steel tube frame, and aluminium body panels that were made using English wheeling machines. The engine was a pre-World War II design of BMW which by the 1960s was considered dated. Bristol decided in 1961 to cease production of its engine and instead to use Chrysler 331 cid (5.4 L) V8 engines. Although untrue, it is commonly believed that AC was left without a future source of power and that American ex-racing driver Carroll Shelby saved the company from bankruptcy. AC started using the 2.6 litre Ford Zephyr engine in its cars. In September 1961, Shelby airmailed AC a letter asking them if they would build him a car modified to accept a V8 engine. AC agreed, provided a suitable engine could be found. He first went to Chevrolet to see if they would provide him with engines, but not wanting to add competition to the Corvette they said no. Ford however, wanted a car that could compete with the Corvette and they happened to have a brand new thin-wall small-block engine which could be used in this endeavor. It was Ford's 260 in? HiPo (4.2 L) engine - a new lightweight, thin-wall cast small-block V8 tuned for high performance. In January 1962 mechanics at AC Cars in Thames Ditton, Surrey fitted the prototype chassis CSX0001 with a 221ci Ford V8. After testing and modification, the engine and transmission were removed and the chassis was air-freighted to Shelby in Los Angeles on 2 February 1962.[1] His team fitted it with an engine and transmission in less than eight hours and began road-testing. Production proved to be easy, since AC had already made most of the modifications needed for the small-block V8 when they installed the 2.6 litre Ford Zephyr engine, including the extensive rework of the AC Ace's front end. The most important modification was the fitting of a stronger rear differential to handle the increased engine power. A Salisbury 4HU unit with inboard disk brakes to reduce unsprung weight was chosen instead of the old ENV unit. It was the same unit used on the Jaguar E-Type. On the production version, the inboard brakes were moved outboard to reduce cost. The only modification of the front end of the first Cobra from that of the AC Ace 2.6 was the steering box, which had to be moved outward to clear the wider V8 motor. The first 75 Cobra Mark I (including the prototype) were fitted with the 260 engine (4.2 L). The remaining 51 Mark I model were fitted with a larger version of the Windsor Ford engine, the 289 in? (4.7 L) V8. In late 1962 Alan Turner, AC's chief engineer completed a major design change of the car's front end and was able to fit it with rack and pinion steering while still using transverse leaf spring suspension. The new car entered production in early 1963 and was designated Mark II. The steering rack was borrowed from the MGB while the new steering column came from the VW Beetle. About 528 Mark II Cobras were produced to the summer of 1965 (the last US-bound Mark II was produced in November 1964). By 1963 the leaf-spring Cobra was losing its supremacy in racing. Shelby tried fitting a larger Ford FE engine of 390 in?. Ken Miles drove and raced the FE-powered Mark II and pronounced the car was virtually undrivable, naming it "The Turd." A new chassis was developed and designated Mark III. The new car was designed in cooperation with Ford in Detroit. A new chassis was built using 4" main chassis tubes (up from 3") and coil spring suspension all around. The new car also had wide fenders and a larger radiator opening. It was powered by the "side oiler" Ford 427 engine (7.0 L) rated at 425 bhp (317 kW), which provided a top speed of 163 mph (262 km/h) in the standard model and 485 bhp (362 kW) with a top speed of 180 mph (290 km/h) in the competition model. Cobra Mark III production began on 1 January 1965; two prototypes had been sent to the United States in October 1964. Cars were sent to the US as unpainted rolling chassis, and they were finished in Shelby's workshop. Although an impressive automobile, the car was a financial failure and did not sell well. In fact to save cost, most AC Cobra 427s were actually fitted with Ford's 428 in? (7.0 L) engine, a long stroke, smaller bore, lower cost engine, intended for road use rather than racing. It seems that a total of 300 Mark III cars were sent to Shelby in the USA during the years 1965 and 1966, including the competition version. 27 small block narrow fender version which were referred to as the AC 289 were sold in Europe. Unfortunately, The MK III missed homologation for the 1965 racing season and was not raced by the Shelby team. However, it was raced successfully by many privateers and went on to win races all the way into the 70s.
Sun Rim Upgrade
Sun Rim Upgrade
Finally finished both front and rear wheels with alloy upgrades Bike: Raleigh Twenty-Shopper [non folding] Manufacture: around March 1968 3 speed SA hub model AW 3-68 month/year model Sun Rims SL-1 Assault 28H ISO 451 19mm width narrow aero profile presta valve Tyres: Primo Comet 20 x 1 3/8 [rims will fit 1 1/8 tyres] Laced with DT Swiss Competition Stainless Steel spokes 14g Cross 3 Had so much fun rebuilding this wheel that i have another project 3 Speed Shimano 333 rear hub 28H and Alex R390 narrow aero rims ISO451 and will use 15guage SS spokes and alloy nipples for the Front I got a WTB 100m sealed bearing hub hollow axle for QR and Alex R390 rims 28H 15g SS spokes. It does help to have the proper tools Park TS-2 truing jig and Park TM-1 tensiometer park spoke wrench[red] The only minor problem im having is the rear brakes doesnt seem to work very well. Im using a dia-compe black compound blocks and maybe it hasnt seated on the rim walls yet. I tried red brake block by weinmanns the one with 6 bumps on it. same thing rear hardly bites...maybe i need to sand it down so it seats on the rim walls? i also have the grey block weinmanns looks like they are asbestos instead of rubber compound they are a bit worn so im hesitant to try them plus i have to sand it down to get the proper angle on this rims and that would even wear them down more none of the LHS carries them anymore and they havent shown in ebay either. can anyone recommend the best brake blocks for machine sidewalls on Aluminum rims ? the brake blocks[im using] seem to work great on chromed steel rims and anodized rims but not machined sidewalls update: im currently using brake blocks from USA manufacturer if i can think of the brand they seem to work better but well see for the long term once they wear down to 100% rim contact

small english wheel
small english wheel
IOGEAR 2.4G Hz Multimedia Mini Keyboard with Trackball, Scroll Wheel and Backlight LED, GKM571R (Black)
IOGEAR's GKM571R is the latest ergonomic palm-sized mini wireless 2.4 GHz wireless keyboard with built-in optical trackball, left and right click buttons and scroll wheel with LED backlight technology for the evolving digital living room. The wireless keyboard with built-in optical trackball allows you to work up to 33 feet away from your home theater living space to control and navigate your home theater computer/laptop and or video game console like never before. The intuitive wireless interaction changes the way you get and drive your multimedia and entertainment contentIn addition to its creative palm-size design it uses the latest LED backlight technology which automatically turns on and off when opening the keyboards stylized protective cover lets you see what you're typing and makes typing in low light or dark rooms effortless and convenient. It also incorporates 19 hotkeys for quick access to multimedia and Microsoft Media Center features and the ability to customize the trackball speed from 400 dpi, 800 dpi or at an amazing 1200 dpi.No driver needed, just plug in the included USB RF Receiver and you're ready to go. Great for PC to TV applicationsHTPC (Home Theater PC) Media Server/Computer/Laptop setups MCE (Windows Media Center) applicationsLatest game consoles such as, PS3 and XBOXIt's the ideal solution for the home entertainment living room and computer enthusiast looking to compliment their PC to TV solution also a perfect solution for meeting room presentation needs.

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