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    wheels
  • Used in reference to the cycle of a specified condition or set of events
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and is fixed below a vehicle or other object to enable it to move easily over the ground
  • (wheel) change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left"
  • (wheel) a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines)
  • steering wheel: a handwheel that is used for steering
  • A circular object that revolves on an axle and forms part of a machine
    buy
  • Pay someone to give up an ownership, interest, or share
  • obtain by purchase; acquire by means of a financial transaction; "The family purchased a new car"; "The conglomerate acquired a new company"; "She buys for the big department store"
  • Procure the loyalty and support of (someone) by bribery
  • bribe: make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence; "This judge can be bought"
  • Obtain in exchange for payment
  • bargain: an advantageous purchase; "she got a bargain at the auction"; "the stock was a real buy at that price"
buy wheels now - Power Wheels
Power Wheels 00801-1773 Forward/Reverse Switch, Push Button
Power Wheels 00801-1773 Forward/Reverse Switch, Push Button
The Power Wheels 00801-1773 Forward/Reverse Switch, Push Button fits models 73243 73248 73260 73268 73510 73520 73600 73610 74350 74351 74353 74370 74388 74547 74550 74553 74557 74560 74570 74580 74590 74591 74593 74598 74750 74753 74760 74765 74770 74780 75560 76136 76141 76173 76176 76181 76184 76188 76222 76229 76235 76247 76248 76803 76816 76817 76819 76821 76970 76973 77565 78475 78580 78583 78605 78606 78607 78608 78610 78613 78620 78630 78633 78640 78643 78650 78653 78656 78660 78680 78683 84750 84760 84770 84780 84900 84950 85000 85300 85325 85355 85375 85400 85430 85440 85510 85660 85700 86220 86225 86250 86255 86260 86265 86270 86280 86340 86350 86370 86390 86470 86560 86570 86580 86830 86840 B1501 B1512 B2077 B9272 B9785 C0727 C0729 C3491 C3493 H4435 H9800 J0713 J8472 K0450 K4564 M3865 N9356 N9732 P5063 P5921 P6830

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The Wonder Wheel
The Wonder Wheel
Coney Island, Brooklyn Summary The Wonder Wheel, which incorporates twenty-four passenger cars of which sixteen slide along serpentine tracks, was invented by Charles Herman of New York as an improvement upon that paragon of pleasure wheels, G.W.G. Ferris's giant wheel erected for the famous Chicago World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. Manufactured by the Eccentric Ferris Wheel Amusement Company for Herman J. Garms, Sr., the Wonder Wheel opened on Memorial Day, 1920, at Coney Island, which had reached its zenith as America's amusement park capital. Offering panoramic views of Brooklyn, the wheel, in turn, is an important feature of that borough's skyline. The Wonder Wheel has been included in films and television commercials. It has maintained an exemplary safety record throughout its sixty-nine years of uninterrupted operation, carrying approximately thirty million pleasure seekers. The Wheel has come, along with the Parachute Jump, to symbolize Coney Island. The History of Coney Island Coney Island has played a part in the history of New York since the first days of European exploration, when Henry Hudson docked his ship, the Half Moon, off its coast in 1609. Lady Deborah Moody and forty followers settled Gravesend, the area north of Coney Island, in 1643; she bought the island itself from the Canarsie Indians in 1654. Not until 1824 did the Gravesend and Coney Island Road and Bridge Company build a shell road from the thriving center of Gravesend to what is now West 8th Street on the island. Along with the commencement of steamer ship service from New York in 1847, this improved access allowed about a half dozen small hotels to spring up by the 1860s. During this period many famous Americans rusticated there: Washington Irving, Herman Melville, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and Walt Whitman. But the nature of vacationing at Coney Island changed quickly during the 1870s, when several railroad companies began service from Brooklyn; the completion of F.L. Olmsted's Ocean Parkway, a designated New York City Scenic Landmark, also provided a comfortable route for carriages. Grand hotels and restaurants accommodated the mostly well-to-do visitors, who came to enjoy not only the ocean and cool sea breezes but also the amusements which were transforming Coney into the most famous family park among its American counterparts. A festive atmosphere was ensured by the transferral to Coney Island of structures from the dismantled Centennial Exposition which had been held in Philadelphia in 1876. Coney Island developed into "America's first and probably still most symbolic commitment to mechanized leisure." The island increasingly became the site for technologically advanced structures such as the balloon hangar, elephant-shaped hotel and observatory (built in 1882, it became an unofficial symbol of American amusement parks), and the Iron Pier (1878) which housed many amusements. Mechanically-driven rides were pioneered at Coney, one example being LaMarcus A. Thompson's Switchback Railway (1884), a precursor of the roller coaster. Most of these rides succeeded because they combined socially acceptable thrills with undertones of sexual intimacy. indeed, Coney Island, which earned the sobriquet "Sodom by the Sea," was "the only place in the United States that Sigmund Freud said interested him." As early as 1883, Coney's name was identified with entertainment, proven by the renaming of a midwestern park as "Ohio Grove, The Coney Island of the West." Between 1880 and 1910 its three large and successful racetracks gave Coney Island the reputation of horseracing capital of the country. In addition to gamblers, such features attracted confidence men, roughnecks, and prostitutes. Coney's many activ- ities could be viewed from above in the three-hundred-foot Iron Tower (originally the Sawyer Tower at the 1876 Exposition). This most notorious phase of Coney's history ended around the turn of the century after many hotels burned down in fires during the 1890s and racetrack betting was outlawed by the state in 1910. A movement led by George C. Tilyou to transform Coney's corrupt image introduced the idea of the enclosed amusement park to American recreation. By 1894 there were dozens of separately owned rides; but the following year Capt. Paul Boyton opened Sea Lion Park, a group of rides and attractions one enjoyed after paying an admission fee at the gate. During the next decade, Coney's three most famous enclosed parks opened: Steeplechase Park (Tilyou's own endeavor), Luna Park, and Dreamland, forming "the largest and most glittering amusement area in the world. Throughout Coney Island and intermingled with rides (such as the Barrel of Love and the Hoop-la) and food vendors, were other typical carnival features such as freak shows, guess-your-weight stands, and games. This scene was enlivened by barkers calling out to potential spectators, elaborate pavilions of eclec
The Wonder Wheel
The Wonder Wheel
Coney Island, Brooklyn Summary The Wonder Wheel, which incorporates twenty-four passenger cars of which sixteen slide along serpentine tracks, was invented by Charles Herman of New York as an improvement upon that paragon of pleasure wheels, G.W.G. Ferris's giant wheel erected for the famous Chicago World's Columbian Exposition of 1893. Manufactured by the Eccentric Ferris Wheel Amusement Company for Herman J. Garms, Sr., the Wonder Wheel opened on Memorial Day, 1920, at Coney Island, which had reached its zenith as America's amusement park capital. Offering panoramic views of Brooklyn, the wheel, in turn, is an important feature of that borough's skyline. The Wonder Wheel has been included in films and television commercials. It has maintained an exemplary safety record throughout its sixty-nine years of uninterrupted operation, carrying approximately thirty million pleasure seekers. The Wheel has come, along with the Parachute Jump, to symbolize Coney Island. The History of Coney Island^ Coney Island has played a part in the history of New York since the first days of European exploration, when Henry Hudson docked his ship, the Half Moon, off its coast in 1609. Lady Deborah Moody and forty followers settled Gravesend, the area north of Coney Island, in 1643; she bought the island itself from the Canarsie Indians in 1654. Not until 1824 did the Gravesend and Coney Island Road and Bridge Company build a shell road from the thriving center of Gravesend to what is now West 8th Street on the island. Along with the commencement of steamer ship service from New York in 1847, this improved access allowed about a half dozen small hotels to spring up by the 1860s. During this period many famous Americans rusticated there: Washington Irving, Herman Melville, Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and Walt Whitman. But the nature of vacationing at Coney Island changed quickly during the 1870s, when several railroad companies began service from Brooklyn; the completion of F.L. Olmsted's Ocean Parkway, a designated New York City Scenic Landmark, also provided a comfortable route for carriages. Grand hotels and restaurants accommodated the mostly well-to-do visitors, who came to enjoy not only the ocean and cool sea breezes but also the amusements which were transforming Coney into the most famous family park among its American counterparts. A festive atmosphere was ensured by the transferral to Coney Island of structures from the dismantled Centennial Exposition which had been held in Philadelphia in 1876. Coney Island developed into "America's first and probably still most symbolic commitment to mechanized leisure." The island increasingly became the site for technologically advanced structures such as the balloon hangar, elephant-shaped hotel and observatory (built in 1882, it became an unofficial symbol of American amusement parks), and the Iron Pier (1878) which housed many amusements. Mechanically-driven rides were pioneered at Coney, one example being LaMarcus A. Thompson's Switchback Railway (1884), a precursor of the roller coaster. Most of these rides succeeded because they combined socially acceptable thrills with undertones of sexual intimacy. indeed, Coney Island, which earned the sobriquet "Sodom by the Sea," was "the only place in the United States that Sigmund Freud said interested him." As early as 1883, Coney's name was identified with entertainment, proven by the renaming of a midwestern park as "Ohio Grove, The Coney Island of the West." Between 1880 and 1910 its three large and successful racetracks gave Coney Island the reputation of horseracing capital of the country. In addition to gamblers, such features attracted confidence men, roughnecks, and prostitutes. Coney's many activ- ities could be viewed from above in the three-hundred-foot Iron Tower (originally the Sawyer Tower at the 1876 Exposition). This most notorious phase of Coney's history ended around the turn of the century after many hotels burned down in fires during the 1890s and racetrack betting was outlawed by the state in 1910. A movement led by George C. Tilyou to transform Coney's corrupt image introduced the idea of the enclosed amusement park to American recreation. By 1894 there were dozens of separately owned rides; but the following year Capt. Paul Boyton opened Sea Lion Park, a group of rides and attractions one enjoyed after paying an admission fee at the gate. During the next decade, Coney's three most famous enclosed parks opened: Steeplechase Park (Tilyou's own endeavor), Luna Park, and Dreamland, forming "the largest and most glittering amusement area in the world. Throughout Coney Island and intermingled with rides (such as the Barrel of Love and the Hoop-la) and food vendors, were other typical carnival features such as freak shows, guess-your-weight stands, and games. This scene was enlivened by barkers calling out to potential spectators, elaborate pavilions of eclec

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