REFRIGERATED FROZEN FOODS MAGAZINE. REFRIGERATED FROZEN

REFRIGERATED FROZEN FOODS MAGAZINE. INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS. CUTE REFRIGERATOR MAGNETS.

Refrigerated Frozen Foods Magazine


refrigerated frozen foods magazine
    frozen foods
  • frozen food: food preserved by freezing
  • Freezing food preserves food from the time it is prepared to the time it is eaten. Since early times, farmers, fishermen, and trappers have preserved their game in unheated buildings during the winter season.
  • (Frozen food) Any food source stored in frozen form. Many types of natural fish foodstuffs are available in frozen sheet or individual small block form to provide fish with natural foods without the dangers of introducing water-borne diseases.
    refrigerated
  • (of food or drink) Chilled, esp. in a refrigerator
  • (refrigeration) deliberately lowering the body's temperature for therapeutic purposes; "refrigeration by immersing the patient's body in a cold bath"
  • (of a vehicle or container) Used to keep or transport food or drink in a chilled condition
  • (refrigeration) the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
  • made or kept cold by refrigeration; "keep the milk refrigerated"; "a refrigerated truck"
    magazine
  • a periodic publication containing pictures and stories and articles of interest to those who purchase it or subscribe to it; "it takes several years before a magazine starts to break even or make money"
  • a business firm that publishes magazines; "he works for a magazine"
  • A regular television or radio program comprising a variety of topical news or entertainment items
  • A chamber for holding a supply of cartridges to be fed automatically to the breech of a gun
  • product consisting of a paperback periodic publication as a physical object; "tripped over a pile of magazines"
  • A periodical publication containing articles and illustrations, typically covering a particular subject or area of interest
refrigerated frozen foods magazine - The Food
The Food of a Younger Land: A portrait of American food- before the national highway system, before chainrestaurants, and before frozen food, when the nation's food was seasonal,
The Food of a Younger Land: A portrait of American food- before the national highway system, before chainrestaurants, and before frozen food, when the nation's food was seasonal,
From the New York Times bestselling author who "powerfully demonstrates the defining role food plays in history and culture" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution).

In the throes of the Great Depression, a make-work initiative for authors-called "America Eats"-was created by the WPA to chronicle the eating habits, traditions, and struggles of local Americans. Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt and Cod, unearths this forgotten literary treasure, chronicling a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food or grocery superstores. Kurlansky brings together the WPA contributions-featuring New York automats and Georgia Coca-Cola parties, Maine lobsters and Montana beaver tails-and brilliantly showcases them with authentic recipes, anecdotes, and photographs.

89% (9)
Gillen Building 421 14th Street
Gillen Building 421 14th Street
Meatpacking District, Gansevoort Market Historic District, Manhattan The New York Times carried an item in February 1913 that announced the imminent construction of this 12-bay building, of concrete construction, for developer John J. Gillen. Henry Kelly & Sons, Inc., wholesale produce merchants, had already leased the four easternmost bays (Nos. 413-419). In March, the paper reported that Kelly would lease an additional two bays. The building was to "contain all facilities for a wholesale market, such as cold air refrigeration, steam heat, modem plumbing, and installation consisting of pressed cork and cement. .. . the combined structures will be known as the Gillen Building." Gillen had been listed in a 1902 directory as an oyster dealer at 51 Gansevoort Street [see]. By 1909, he had become a developer and was a frequent partner with architect James H. Maher [see Architects Appendix], as he was with this building. In 1918, Gillen was living in Newark (he was the brother of that city's mayor). He was later the co-owner with Maher of 401-403 West 14" Street [see], constructed in 1923 to Maher's design, and the Herring Building, 669-685 Hudson Street [see]. Maher and Gillen both had their offices in 413-425 West 14" Street. Gillen's son, attorney John J. Gillen, Jr., also had his office here for years. In 1922 (Alt. 2603- 1921), afourth-story addition, to the design of architectlengineer William P. Seaver, was constructed atop the eastern portion of the building (Nos. 413-419) for Edward J. Kelly. John J. Gillen assigned his lease on that portion of the property to the Henry Kelly Holding Corp. in 1933. Metal canopies were installed over the storefronts over the years: Nos. 413-419 [1914], No. 43 1 (1914), Nos. 421- 427 and 433 (1926), No. 435 (1929), and No. 429 (1954). From its completion in 1914 until the 1980s, this building successfully attracted many longterm tenants in the food industries: Henry Kelly & Sons, Inc., distributors of fruit, produce, liquor, and food; Charles Gachot (died 1928), a French-born merchant whose firm (established 1903) supplied meat and poultry for hotels and restaurants; George Ehlenberger & Co., butter, eggs and cheese for hotels, steamships and restaurants, another Kelly family concern; W.J. Hinrichs & Blanchard Bros.1 L&G Blanchard Co., and Dulany & Tull, commission merchants; Poggi Bros. & Fantini's restaurant; Frank's Restaurant; Seymour Packing Co., frozen eggs; J. Cousin, butcher supplies; Herman Schlosser, Inc./Corp., Cudahy Bros. Co., Lodell Poultry Corp.1 Metzger Meat Specialties, Royal F. Hinrichs, S[amuel]. Schweitzer & Sons, Long Island Beef Co., Joseph Martorelli & Sons, Bronx Meat Co. and associated firms, Baslor-Schwartz Meat Products, Inc., and Plymouth Beef Co., meat and poultry; and PHs Ships Supply Corp. This Arts and Crafts style building, despite some alterations, contributes to the historicallymixed architectural character and varied uses - including market-related functions - of the Gansevoort Market Historic District. Constructed in 1913-14, during a major phase of development of the district, when buildings were constructed for produce- and meat-related businesses or other market uses, this building further contributes to the visual cohesion of West 14" Street in that it is one of three buildings designed by architect James S. Maher, who was also a partner in its development. ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Belgian block paving still visible on most streets. The street layout is shaped by the transition between the irregular pattern of northwestern Greenwich Village (as far north as Gansevoort Street) and the grid of the 1811 Commissioner's Plan. Unusually large and open intersections contribute to the area's unique quality, particularly where Ninth Avenue meets West 14'~S treet and Gansevoort Street (which was widen
Gillen Building 439 West 14th Street
Gillen Building 439 West 14th Street
Meatpacking District, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The New York Times carried an item in February 1913 that announced the imminent construction of this 12-bay building, of concrete construction, for developer John J. Gillen. Henry Kelly & Sons, Inc., wholesale produce merchants, had already leased the four easternmost bays (Nos. 413-419). In March, the paper reported that Kelly would lease an additional two bays. The building was to "contain all facilities for a wholesale market, such as cold air refrigeration, steam heat, modem plumbing, and installation consisting of pressed cork and cement. .. . the combined structures will be known as the Gillen Building." Gillen had been listed in a 1902 directory as an oyster dealer at 51 Gansevoort Street [see]. By 1909, he had become a developer and was a frequent partner with architect James H. Maher [see Architects Appendix], as he was with this building. In 1918, Gillen was living in Newark (he was the brother of that city's mayor). He was later the co-owner with Maher of 401-403 West 14" Street [see], constructed in 1923 to Maher's design, and the Herring Building, 669-685 Hudson Street [see]. Maher and Gillen both had their offices in 413-425 West 14" Street. Gillen's son, attorney John J. Gillen, Jr., also had his office here for years. In 1922 (Alt. 2603- 1921), afourth-story addition, to the design of architectlengineer William P. Seaver, was constructed atop the eastern portion of the building (Nos. 413-419) for Edward J. Kelly. John J. Gillen assigned his lease on that portion of the property to the Henry Kelly Holding Corp. in 1933. Metal canopies were installed over the storefronts over the years: Nos. 413-419 [1914], No. 43 1 (1914), Nos. 421- 427 and 433 (1926), No. 435 (1929), and No. 429 (1954). From its completion in 1914 until the 1980s, this building successfully attracted many longterm tenants in the food industries: Henry Kelly & Sons, Inc., distributors of fruit, produce, liquor, and food; Charles Gachot (died 1928), a French-born merchant whose firm (established 1903) supplied meat and poultry for hotels and restaurants; George Ehlenberger & Co., butter, eggs and cheese for hotels, steamships and restaurants, another Kelly family concern; W.J. Hinrichs & Blanchard Bros.1 L&G Blanchard Co., and Dulany & Tull, commission merchants; Poggi Bros. & Fantini's restaurant; Frank's Restaurant; Seymour Packing Co., frozen eggs; J. Cousin, butcher supplies; Herman Schlosser, Inc./Corp., Cudahy Bros. Co., Lodell Poultry Corp.1 Metzger Meat Specialties, Royal F. Hinrichs, S[amuel]. Schweitzer & Sons, Long Island Beef Co., Joseph Martorelli & Sons, Bronx Meat Co. and associated firms, Baslor-Schwartz Meat Products, Inc., and Plymouth Beef Co., meat and poultry; and PHs Ships Supply Corp. This Arts and Crafts style building, despite some alterations, contributes to the historicallymixed architectural character and varied uses - including market-related functions - of the Gansevoort Market Historic District. Constructed in 1913-14, during a major phase of development of the district, when buildings were constructed for produce- and meat-related businesses or other market uses, this building further contributes to the visual cohesion of West 14" Street in that it is one of three buildings designed by architect James S. Maher, who was also a partner in its development. ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Belgian block paving still visible on most streets. The street layout is shaped by the transition between the irregular pattern of northwestern Greenwich Village (as far north as Gansevoort Street) and the grid of the 1811 Commissioner's Plan. Unusually large and open intersections contribute to the area's unique quality, particularly where Ninth Avenue meets West 14'~S treet and Gansevoort Street (which was w

refrigerated frozen foods magazine
refrigerated frozen foods magazine
Fresh Baby So Easy Baby Food and Breast Milk Trays
Fresh Baby Food Trays are specially designed for making fresh-frozen baby in quantity and at home. Making baby food in quantity once or twice a week is easy and convenient and the Fresh Baby Food Trays make it's even easier. We designed our trays so that each compartment is a one-ounce cube - a single serving size for your baby. Each tray contains 12 compartments. Using one set of trays you make 24 servings of baby food at a time! Plus, each Fresh Baby Food Tray includes a cover to prevent freezer burn and to keep freezer odors out of your baby's food.

Comments