MAKE YOUR OWN LOGO T SHIRT - LOGO T SHIRT

Make Your Own Logo T Shirt - Mens T Shirts

Make Your Own Logo T Shirt


make your own logo t shirt
    t shirt
  • jersey: a close-fitting pullover shirt
  • T Shirt is a 1976 album by Loudon Wainwright III. Unlike his earlier records, this (and the subsequent 'Final Exam') saw Wainwright adopt a full blown rock band (Slowtrain) - though there are acoustic songs on T-Shirt, including a talking blues.
  • A short-sleeved casual top, generally made of cotton, having the shape of a T when spread out flat
  • A T-shirt (T shirt or tee) is a shirt which is pulled on over the head to cover most of a person's torso. A T-shirt is usually buttonless and collarless, with a round neck and short sleeves.
    make
  • give certain properties to something; "get someone mad"; "She made us look silly"; "He made a fool of himself at the meeting"; "Don't make this into a big deal"; "This invention will make you a millionaire"; "Make yourself clear"
  • brand: a recognizable kind; "there's a new brand of hero in the movies now"; "what make of car is that?"
  • The manufacturer or trade name of a particular product
  • engage in; "make love, not war"; "make an effort"; "do research"; "do nothing"; "make revolution"
  • The structure or composition of something
  • The making of electrical contact
    logo
  • (logos) Son: the divine word of God; the second person in the Trinity (incarnate in Jesus)
  • A symbol or other small design adopted by an organization to identify its products, uniform, vehicles, etc
  • A logo is a graphic mark or emblem commonly used by commercial enterprises, organizations and even individuals to aid and promote instant public recognition. Logos are either purely graphic (symbols/icons) or are composed of the name of the organization (a logotype or wordmark).
  • a company emblem or device

Munch Magazine Cover Close-up
Munch Magazine Cover Close-up
I was very kindly asked to do an interview for a student magazine put together by a group of students who are studying the same course I did at the same college I went to so I was more than happy to oblige. I was blown away at the quality and professionalism of the finished magazine, which is free and available for free in Casino, Rollersnakes, Jade and more in Leicester! A big thanks to Matt & co for the opportunity to be a part of the mag and good luck to them! Here's the actual interview: I. What inspired you to set up on your own and pursue you own ideas? It was the thought of being able to be free with my creativity and do my own thing. I vividly remember looking upto my boss, the owner of the design agency I used to work for, thinking "how the hell do you own your company, it seems so fun, no idea how you do it" but not too long after that I was my own boss, which is the best feeling in the world! I've always been one for wanting to give everything a go to, even if I knew nothing about it e.g editing or painting, I've got a big thirst for anything creative and it doesnt normally matter if I can do it or not, I just love giving things a go! II. What, if any, were you biggest hurdles to overcome in the early stages? What are the hurdles now? I guess the biggest hurdles are getting your name out there and building up your portfolio, but that's something time sorts out for you. I found if you just keep working hard and love what you're doing, things fall into place as people recognise when you work hard and have a passion I reckon. I've been super super lucky in having the nicest clients too, in areas I'm really interested so I think luck has a big part to play! As for hurdles now, I'd say it's more the business side of things. Dealing with tax, invoices, business things like that ~ Im a designer and not a businessman so it's far easier for me to learn a technique in illustrator than it is to figure out a tax form. It's dealing with business and graphics and getting them both right that's the hardest part i'd say, but don't let that put you off, Id I can do it, failing maths TWICE then anyone can do it! III. What is the most important lesson you have had to learn as a free-lance designer? That being nice gets you everywhere! Seriously, being nice to people and complementing others on great work and just actively being part of the art / graphics community helps so much as you make great friends and connections. You never know where things can lead, and thats the most exciting part! IV. Jam Factory has a strong stylistic indentity, does this ever work against you? I guess it has yeah, as maybe potential clients may see my style of work and think "I dont like that style" or "This wouldnt suit what I need" and they go elsewhere! I try to vary everything I do and mix up styles but I think it still shines through however I try to hide it. That's all cool though, I hope i do have my own style, so that's a good thing to have your own identity I think. Im sure every designer or artist in the world who has a distinctive style has had it work against them at some point, it's just the way it goes I guess! V. Do you worry about waking up one morning to find that your favoured style is "out of date"? I do a bit yeah but I like ot think that the harder you work the better you become. It's like anything, the more you practice then the better you get! I love designing and doodling and being creative, so the more I do it, hopefully the better I get and therefor taking my own work forward, hopefully not becoming 'out of date'. I also really enjoying trying something new, trying more complex ideas or just tacking something in a different way to before, so I think that way of continually pushing yourself further will help counter becoming stale and out of date (fingers crossed anyways!) VI. What role does the computer play in Jam Factories out-put? Do you still doodle/sketch? I do indeed still doodles and sketch, infact I think it's really important to! There's not a project that goes by that hasn't started life in a sketchbook in one way or another. Sometimes it's a quick scribble and afew words, other times every last detail is sketched out first! But yeah, I do think it's important to start with pen and paper, lets you just rough out the ideas first and start the process, then you can move onto the computer with a clear direction of where you're going with something. As for the computer role, man I'm a complete nerd so my Mac pretty much does everything possible. I use it for everything aswell as all JamFactory-related stuff, I'm lost if I've not got my 'puter, sad but true! VII. What are the sorts of things that you do to attract clients? I tend to do a little sexy dance for them, that always works wonders. I don't really... maybe I should? Aside from the da
Munch Magazine Interview
Munch Magazine Interview
I was very kindly asked to do an interview for a student magazine put together by a group of students who are studying the same course I did at the same college I went to so I was more than happy to oblige. I was blown away at the quality and professionalism of the finished magazine, which is free and available for free in Casino, Rollersnakes, Jade and more in Leicester! A big thanks to Matt & co for the opportunity to be a part of the mag and good luck to them! Here's the actual interview: I. What inspired you to set up on your own and pursue you own ideas? It was the thought of being able to be free with my creativity and do my own thing. I vividly remember looking upto my boss, the owner of the design agency I used to work for, thinking "how the hell do you own your company, it seems so fun, no idea how you do it" but not too long after that I was my own boss, which is the best feeling in the world! I've always been one for wanting to give everything a go to, even if I knew nothing about it e.g editing or painting, I've got a big thirst for anything creative and it doesnt normally matter if I can do it or not, I just love giving things a go! II. What, if any, were you biggest hurdles to overcome in the early stages? What are the hurdles now? I guess the biggest hurdles are getting your name out there and building up your portfolio, but that's something time sorts out for you. I found if you just keep working hard and love what you're doing, things fall into place as people recognise when you work hard and have a passion I reckon. I've been super super lucky in having the nicest clients too, in areas I'm really interested so I think luck has a big part to play! As for hurdles now, I'd say it's more the business side of things. Dealing with tax, invoices, business things like that ~ Im a designer and not a businessman so it's far easier for me to learn a technique in illustrator than it is to figure out a tax form. It's dealing with business and graphics and getting them both right that's the hardest part i'd say, but don't let that put you off, Id I can do it, failing maths TWICE then anyone can do it! III. What is the most important lesson you have had to learn as a free-lance designer? That being nice gets you everywhere! Seriously, being nice to people and complementing others on great work and just actively being part of the art / graphics community helps so much as you make great friends and connections. You never know where things can lead, and thats the most exciting part! IV. Jam Factory has a strong stylistic indentity, does this ever work against you? I guess it has yeah, as maybe potential clients may see my style of work and think "I dont like that style" or "This wouldnt suit what I need" and they go elsewhere! I try to vary everything I do and mix up styles but I think it still shines through however I try to hide it. That's all cool though, I hope i do have my own style, so that's a good thing to have your own identity I think. Im sure every designer or artist in the world who has a distinctive style has had it work against them at some point, it's just the way it goes I guess! V. Do you worry about waking up one morning to find that your favoured style is "out of date"? I do a bit yeah but I like ot think that the harder you work the better you become. It's like anything, the more you practice then the better you get! I love designing and doodling and being creative, so the more I do it, hopefully the better I get and therefor taking my own work forward, hopefully not becoming 'out of date'. I also really enjoying trying something new, trying more complex ideas or just tacking something in a different way to before, so I think that way of continually pushing yourself further will help counter becoming stale and out of date (fingers crossed anyways!) VI. What role does the computer play in Jam Factories out-put? Do you still doodle/sketch? I do indeed still doodles and sketch, infact I think it's really important to! There's not a project that goes by that hasn't started life in a sketchbook in one way or another. Sometimes it's a quick scribble and afew words, other times every last detail is sketched out first! But yeah, I do think it's important to start with pen and paper, lets you just rough out the ideas first and start the process, then you can move onto the computer with a clear direction of where you're going with something. As for the computer role, man I'm a complete nerd so my Mac pretty much does everything possible. I use it for everything aswell as all JamFactory-related stuff, I'm lost if I've not got my 'puter, sad but true! VII. What are the sorts of things that you do to attract clients? I tend to do a little sexy dance for them, that always works wonders. I don't really... maybe I should? Aside from

make your own logo t shirt
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