FLIGHT FOLLOW. FLIGHT

Flight Follow. Flight Instruction Jobs. Flight Delays Cancellations.

Flight Follow


flight follow
    flight follow
  • (flight following) (JP 1-02, NATO) - The task of maintaining contact with specified aircraft for the purpose of determining en route progress and/or flight termination. (See also air control point (ACP), air corridor, and communications checkpoint (CCP).) See FMs 1-111 and 100-103.
  • (Flight Following) Consists of radar traffic advisories provided to VFR aircraft by air traffic control on a workload permitting basis. Although advice regarding proximity to other aircraft may be provided it is still the VFR pilot's responsibility to see and avoid other aircraft.
  • (FLIGHT FOLLOWING) ATC radar surveillance of VFR flights at pilot request over water or desolate areas. Facilitates search and rescue should it be needed. Service provided only if controller is not too busy with IFR traffic.
flight follow - F/A-18A/B/C/D F404-GE-400/402
F/A-18A/B/C/D F404-GE-400/402 Engine Slotted Spraybar Inlet Flameholder Follow-On Flight Test Evaluation
F/A-18A/B/C/D F404-GE-400/402 Engine Slotted Spraybar Inlet Flameholder Follow-On Flight Test Evaluation
This is a NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER AIRCRAFT DIV PATUXENT RIVER MD report procured by the Pentagon and made available for public release. It has been reproduced in the best form available to the Pentagon. It is not spiral-bound, but rather assembled with Velobinding in a soft, white linen cover. The Storming Media report number is A068704. The abstract provided by the Pentagon follows: The current production F404-GE-400/402 flameholder (P/N 6056T68G07) experiences a high rate of replacement in the F/A-18A-D fleet, The replacement of the F404-GE400 (-400) and F404-GE-402 (-402) flameholder requires the removal of the spraybars and support links, which can only be accomplished with the removal of the engine from the aircraft, For the -402 engine, flameholder replacement is the number one reason for unscheduled engine removals. The flameholder is exchangeable between the 402 and -400 engine, although the flameholder installed in the 402 engine has a lower life than the -400 engine flameholder because of the increased temperature severity to which the flameholder is exposed. A slotted flameholder designed to allow flameholder replacement with the engine installed in the aircraft was determined to be the best design solution. It would not require any modification to other afterburner (A/B) hardware, and after the initial installation the flameholder could be removed with the engine installed. Previous flight tests were conducted with the first version of the slotted flameholder (P/N 6056T68G10GK). Improvements to durability and operability were incorporated into the second flight test version of the slotted flameholder (P/N 6056T68G10G1) in an attempt to produce a slotted flameholder with similar durability and operability as the current production flameholder. The purpose of this flight test was to evaluate the A/B light-off performance of the slotted flameholder (P/N 6056T68G10G1) for the F/A-18A-D aircraft with F404-GE-400/402 engines.

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Human Space Flight Plans Committee (200906170002HQ)
Human Space Flight Plans Committee (200906170002HQ)
Norman Augustine, chair of the Human Space Flight Review Committee, front center, is joined by other members of the committee, clockwise from left, Bohdan Bejmuk, Leroy Chiao, Dr. Wanda Austin, Philip McAlister, Dr. Edward Crawley, Jeffrey Greason and Dr. Christopher Chyba prior to the start of the first of several public meetings at different U.S. locations, Wednesday, June 17, 2009, at the Carnegie Institution in Washington. The panel will examine ongoing and planned NASA development activities and potential alternatives in order to present options for advancing a safe, innovative, affordable and sustainable human space flight program following the space shuttle's retirement. The committee will present its results by August 2009. Members of the committee that were not in attendance and are not pictured are Dr. Charles Kennel, Retired Air Force Gen. Lester Lyles and former astronaut Sally Ride. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)
Flight Suit Worn by Charles Lindbergh, 1927
Flight Suit Worn by Charles Lindbergh, 1927
Flight Suit Worn by Charles Lindbergh. Photograph by Bob Little, 1977. Missouri History Museum, Museum Collections. Acc.# 1928 083 0001. N25418. Photograph © 1977, Missouri History Museum. This brown cotton twill coverall flight suit with fur collar was worn during Charles Lindbergh's historic trans-Atlantic flight in May of 1927. Lindbergh recognized the importance of this suit by writing under the collar "Worn on the following flights: San Diego - St. Louis, St. Louis - New York, New York - Paris. Charles Lindbergh (signature)" The flight suit was made by A. G. Spalding & Bros. and cost $50.00 according to a telegram he received from the company dated March 24, 1927.

flight follow
flight follow
Completion and Testing of a TMR Computing Testbed and Recommendations for a Flight-Ready Follow-On Design
This is a NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA report procured by the Pentagon and made available for public release. It has been reproduced in the best form available to the Pentagon. It is not spiral-bound, but rather assembled with Velobinding in a soft, white linen cover. The Storming Media report number is A424683. The abstract provided by the Pentagon follows: This thesis focuses on the completion and hardware testing of a fault tolerant computer system utilizing Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR). Due to the radiation environment in space, electronics in space applications must be designed to accommodate single event phenomena. While radiation hardened processors are available, they offer lower performance and higher cost than commercial off the shelf processors. In order to utilize non-hardened devices, a fault tolerance scheme such as TMR may be implemented to increase reliability in a radiation environment. The design that was completed in this effort is one such implementation. The completion of the hardware design consisted of programming logic devices, implementing hardware design corrections, and the design of an overall system controller. The testing effort included basic power and ground verification checks to programming, executing, and evaluating programs in read only memory. During this phase, additional design changes were implemented to correct design flaws. This thesis also evaluated the preliminary design changes required for a space implementation of this TMR design. This included design changes due to size, power, and weight restrictions. Additionally, a detailed analysis of component survivability was performed based on past radiation testing.

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