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Billing Rates Law Firms


billing rates law firms
    billing rates
  • Monetary amounts used to bill clients.  Each project, user, or category may have different billable rates.
    law firms
  • (Law firm) a group of lawyers in private practice; the entry-level members of a law firm are called associates, and the owners are called partners
  • (law firm) a firm of lawyers
  • (The Law Firm) The Law Firm is an hour-long reality television series that premiered on NBC on July 28, 2005. In the series, twelve young up-and-coming trial lawyers competed for a grand prize of $250,000.
billing rates law firms - Tips For
Tips For Independent Computer Consultants: Find Projects Faster - Earn Higher Billing Rates
Tips For Independent Computer Consultants: Find Projects Faster - Earn Higher Billing Rates
Tips for Independent Computer Consultants is a highly focused, hands on manual for anyone considering or already working as an independent consultant. Today, consulting became a major opportunity for those who want to work for themselves. This practical book is filled with detailed advice and provides real world tips for key issues facing independent computer consultants such as: -Writing "consultant" resume -Making thousands of dollars more by deciding whether it is best to be a W2, 1099 or C2C consultant -Having recruiters and clients look for you, instead of you looking for them -Understanding why recruiters work against you not for you -Screening recruiters and agencies -Negotiating with recruiters and agencies -Realizing advantages of working on a short term contract -Asking for a rate increase Introduction Did you ever wonder why a person sitting next to you in the office chooses to work as an independent computer consultant while telling you that he/she is not getting any benefits such health insurance, paid vacation and sick leave? The answer is very simple and may surprise you. This person is doing it because he/she is making 50-100% more than you are while doing the same exact work. At the same time this person does not have to worry about office politics, size of the annual bonus and whether or not he/she will be getting a promotion. The reason for this is rather simple; all this person really cares and worries about is this person's hourly rate that he/she is getting for every hour that he/she is working. In addition to making 50-100% more than a permanent employee independent computer consultant, depending on contractual status, gets to deduct various items as business expenses such as cell phone, home internet connection, tolls for traveling between client sites as well as gets to make bigger tax deductible contributions to 401k style plans.

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Westfield Township District School No. 5
Westfield Township District School No. 5
Tottenville, Staten Island, New York City, New York Westfield Township District School No. 5, erected in 1878'(architect undetermined) and enlarged in 1896-97 to plans provided by the architectural firm of Pierce & Brun, demonstrates the strong commitment of the inhabitants of Tottenville to education. As the oldest public school remaining in use on Staten Island, the building recalls the era when such schools on Staten Island were under the jurisdiction of Richmond County and the State of New York. The brick schoolhouse appears to have been designed by a builder or architect familiar with the neo-Grec style. The facade, with its temple-inspired form, incorporates stylized classical elements and incised ornament, while the side walls have a robust rhythm established by pilasters and window openings with denticulated window heads. The growing population of the village and the establishment of a two-year high school department prompted the construction of an addition to the schoolhouse in 1896-97. Pierce & Brun established a T-shaped plan and incorporated signature elements of the original building into an up-to-date scheme with banks of windows and a weII-lighted central stairhall. Denticulated brick window heads and patterned bands, as well as the bracketed wood cornice, unite the two portions of the building into a harmonious whole. The projects, undertaken by the School District Board of Trustees and Board of Education with the approval of district residents, were exercises in local government as well as architectural achievements. The schoolhouse, part of the educational complex in Tottenville, remains in use as the Public School 1 Annex. HistQfy gfTQtterfe' The southwestern tip of Staten Island (Richmond County), once an important Native American habitation site and burial ground, has a recorded history which dates to the 1670s, when Captain Christopher Billopp built a stone manor house (the Billopp or Conference House, a designated New York City Landmark) and initiated ferry service to Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Billopp's plantation, later enlarged and given the title "Manor of Bentley," was the largest holding in the West Division (later renamed Westfield Township), one of the four precincts into which the county was divided. Following the Revolution, the Billopp property was confiscated by the State of New York, partitioned, and sold; it continued to be used largely for farming and as a base for fishing and associated maritime trades. Gradually the land was subdivided into smaller lots and by the 1840s a hamlet began to form around the ferry landing and the nearby sections of Amboy Road, the path leading to it. The slow-growing settlement soon came to be known as Tottenville, after the prominent family who had erected a wharf, Totten's Landing. Many local residents were engaged in the oyster business and ship-building, which remained leading occupations and mainstays of the area economy into the 1920s, while the waterfront setting and frequent steamer and ferry connections prompted the development of small summer resorts, restaurants, hotels, and other recreation businesses. The completion in 1860 of the Staten Island Railroad, which ran from Vanderbilt's Landing on the island's east shore to a depot near the hamlet's ferry landing, establishing an important link between the developing village and the rest of the island, spurred the growth of an adjacent commercial area. During the subsequent decade, a post office was begun and soon named Tottenville, and the hamlet was officially incorporated as a village — the only one to be chartered on the island's southern and western sections. The village, re-incorporated in 1894, reached a peak of development at the close of the nineteenth century, when many commercial and civic institutions — such as the Tottenville Free Library, several weekly newspapers, the Atlantic Terra Cotta Works, and the Tottenville Copper Company — were established. From the 1870s through much of the present century, Tottenville has been the largest, most populous, and most cohesive settlement in the southern section of Staten Island and has retained its individuality as a suburban village. Common Schools on Staten Island Prior to the consolidation of Greater New York in 1898, the schools on Staten Island were under the jurisdiction of the Richmond County Superintendent of Schools and the State of New York. Though thought of today as public schools - as opposed to private or parochial institutions - they were known as "common schools" throughout the nineteenth century. In 1854, local school districts, organized and numbered by township, were given the power to select sites for schools and raise the money to construct and maintain schoolhouses, in addition to other school supervisory powers. Common school districts received financial support from state sources and school district taxes; some continued to use the rate bill system and assessed parents accor
Burnell Tovey Bristol Undertakers
Burnell Tovey Bristol Undertakers
The stonemason's yard behind Bedminster Parade where Burnell Tovey's funeral firm was established in 1860. Before the last war, there were probably around 50 family-owned funeral directors firms in the city. Now only a handful remain — all the rest have been taken over by the big groups. Funerals were very big business in the 19th century, when Queen Victoria set the fashion for prolonged and deep mourning. The ostentatious funeral was a Victorian invention; in the 18th century, the work would be done either by a carpenter, a mason or a draper, and these three trades are the usual origin of the 19th century firms. Thomas Pakeman was a draper before he started his funeral firm in Whiteladies Road in 1870; he had supplied mourning clothes as a sideline. Mourning wear was big business, since the whole family, and their servants, went into black for specified periods, according to the degree of kinship. Bristol had two funeral warehouses selling mourning clothes, and dyers advertised 'black dyed every week'. One of the oldest surviving funeral firms seems to be Cotton and Sons of Eastville, who were founded around 1855 by Alonzo Cotton, a tinsmith, in West Street, Old Market. He deserves fame for another reason: in 1877, his wife fell down the stairs, and, to get her to the BRI, Alonzo Cotton naturally used his horse and funeral cart — and in so doing introduced the idea of starting a branch of St. John’s Ambulance Brigade in the city. He hired out his horse and cart to them and eventually became their Chief Superintendent, and won the MBE. He was succeeded by his sons George and Lionel, who exchanged horses and plumes for a motor hearse in 1926, and the business was then handed down to the present owner, another Alonzo, whose son Michael is also in the firm. Thomas Davis was a Bristol orphan who was taken under the wing of Thomas Bishop, who ran a carriage and fly hire service, as well as a funeral business, in Bedminster. Thomas Davis was apprenticed and himself took over the business in 1870. The firm’s ledgers, which date back to 1846, show the high mortality rate in Bristol in page after page of child deaths and adult deaths under the age of 30. Davis and his sons after him provided all the pomp of a Victorian funeral, with horses and mutes, and black ostrich feathers, right up to 1946, when the founder’s grandson, Brian, reckons they held the last old style horse-drawn funeral in the city. He says they still get the odd request for horse-drawn funerals and have to hire the coach and horses from Dodington. A monumental mason who started up in business in 1860 was Edwin Burnell, who had a yard in East Street, Bedminster, site of the firm to this day. He was a monumental mason until 1914, when his son-in-law Albert Tovey started doing funerals as well. Their very first was for a Mrs. Spratt, in 1914; they provided 'a polished elm coffin, brassed fittings, brocade padded sides, flannel robe, inscription, plate and bearer, one no.3 car and one no.2 carriage, all for ?7. 2s. — and the bill was never paid! 'Well', said Albert philosophically to his son Reginald, 'that was the Spratt to catch a mackerel.' The fifth Burnell-Tovey, as the business became styled, is Richard, who reckons he is the best qualified funeral director in the land, with a B.Sc, an M.Sc, and Dip F.D. —and he says he never intended to go into the business! His great-great-grandfather has another claim to fame: he was a highly religious man who founded the East Street Baptist Church; the first Bible classes were held above what is now the funeral parlour. The austerity during and after the Second World War, put an end to the extravagant funeral with mutes, velvet pall, cloaks and child attendants, and mourners gave up wearing black for months and writing on black-edged writing paper and carrying black-edged handkerchiefs. The only vestiges of long-term mourning that we retain are the black tie and armband, a relic of the crepe bands that Victorian Bristolians wore on their hats. Even in their passing, Bristol’s famous traders liked to have everything ship-shape and Bristol fashion.

billing rates law firms
billing rates law firms
Telecommunications Expense Management: How to Audit Your Bills, Reduce Expenses, and Negotiate Favorable Rates
This straightforward book will provide you with the insight necessary to save your organization revenue through the processes of bill auditing, expense reduction, and savvy contract negotiations. Information technology professionals will find the authors' suggestions useful, and yet uncomplicated to implement. After you have used their suggestions to identify possible errors or optimization opportunities, the book details what steps need to be taken to secure the associated recoveries or service changes, including contact and phone numbers. In addition, their contract negotiation tips could save your organization dollars up front by providing information you need at the bargaining table. This important tool is a must-have for all information technology professionals. ;

For anyone responsible for monitoring telecommunications-related expenses, this book is packed with invaluable tips on increasing efficiency, service, and support of telecom and IT while keeping costs in check. The authors teach how to audit bills, negotiate favorable contracts, and find the best (and cheapest) long distance carriers and vendors.

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