AUSTIN CITY ATTORNEY. CITY ATTORNEY

Austin City Attorney. Federal Disability Lawyer. Elder Law Firm

Austin City Attorney


austin city attorney
    city attorney
  • A city attorney can be an elected or position in city and municipal government in the United States. The city attorney is the attorney representing the city or municipality.
  • An attorney who, in part, prosecutes Class C misdemeanors in municipal court.
  • Represents city in legal matters and gives legal advice concerning city affairs.
    austin
  • state capital of Texas on the Colorado River; site of the University of Texas
  • The Austin Amtrak station is located in the former station of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, just west of downtown Austin, Texas, United States. The station is served by Amtrak's Texas Eagle route, extending north to Chicago and west to Los Angeles.
  • The Austin was a brass era American automobile manufactured in Grand Rapids, Michigan from 1901 to 1921. The company, founded by James E.
  • John (1790–1859), English jurist. His work is significant for its strict delimitation of the sphere of law and its distinction from that of morality
austin city attorney - Parks And
Parks And Other Public Properties Of The City Of Elizabeth, New Jersey
Parks And Other Public Properties Of The City Of Elizabeth, New Jersey
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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USCGC Taney (WHEC-37)
USCGC Taney (WHEC-37)
USCGC Taney (WPG/WAGC/WHEC-37) (pronounced /?te?ni?/ TAY-nee) is a United States Coast Guard High Endurance Cutter, notable as the last ship floating that fought in the attack on Pearl Harbor, although she was actually moored in nearby Honolulu Harbor not Pearl Harbor itself. She was named for Roger B. Taney (1777–1864), at various times: US Attorney General, Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. She is also one of two Treasury-class (out of seven total) Coast Guard Cutters still afloat. Serving her country for 50 years, the Taney saw action in both theaters of combat in World War II, serving as command ship at the Battle of Okinawa, and as part of fleet escort in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. She also served in the Vietnam War in Operation Market Time. Taney also patrolled the seas working in drug interdiction and fisheries protection and participated in the search for Amelia Earhart. World War II The message: "Air Raid, Pearl Harbor. This is no drill" came at 07:55 on December 7, as Japanese planes swept overhead in an attempt to cripple the Pacific Fleet. Taney, moored alongside Pier 6, Honolulu harbor, manned her anti-aircraft guns swiftly when word of the surprise attack reached her simultaneously. As no Japanese attacks were directed at Honolulu harbor, the Coast Guard cutter was only given the opportunity to fire at stray aircraft which happened to venture into her vicinity. She was firing upon unidentified aircraft as late as noon, indicating that the eager Coast Guardsmen were probably shooting at American planes—not Japanese.[2] Taney patrolled the waters off Honolulu for the remainder of 1941 and into 1942, conducting many depth charge attacks on suspected submarines in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack. During this time, the ship received the classification WPG-37. On January 22, 1942, the cutter departed Honolulu in company with SS Barbara Olson, and arrived at Kanton Island on the January 28. After sending a working party ashore to unload supplies, Taney screened Barbara Olson offshore until February 7, when both ships got underway to evacuate the American colony on Enderbury Island. Embarking the four colonists at 10:15 that day, Taney shelled the island and destroyed its buildings to prevent them from being used by Japanese forces. Taney subsequently escorted her merchantman consort to Jarvis Island, where she evacuated the four Interior Department colonists and burned all structures to the ground before departing. Reaching Palmyra Atoll on the February 12, the ships remained there until the February 15, before Taney headed back for the Hawaiian Islands, arriving at Honolulu on March 5. She made another voyage to Palmyra Island later that spring and when heading back to Hawaii, she received orders to search for survivors in the waters around Midway Island after the Battle of Midway, including a stop at the island itself. Taney operated locally out of Honolulu into 1943 before sailing for Boston late that winter. Prior to heading for the east coast, the ship received a re-gunning at Mare Island, being fitted with four single-mount, 5-inch guns, making her the only ship in her class with this modification. After making port at Boston on March 14, 1944, Taney soon shifted south to Hampton Roads, where she arrived on March 31. Early in April, she departed Norfolk as a unit of Task Force 66 (TF 66) as convoy guide for convoy UGS-38. The passage across the Atlantic proved uneventful, as the convoy made landfall off the Azores on April 13. Some 35 minutes after sunset on April 20, however, the convoy was spotted and tracked by the Germans, who launched a three-pronged attack with Junkers Ju 88 and Heinkel He 111 medium bombers. Each flew very low, using the shoreline as a background, thus confusing the search radar of the Allied ships. The first wave struck from dead ahead, torpedoing SS Paul Hamilton and SS Samite. The former, which had been inexcusably carrying both a load of ammunition as well as hundreds of Army Air Corps personnel, blew up in a shattering explosion—killing all 504 men on board. The second wave of German torpedo planes hit the SS Stephen F. Austin and SS Royal Star. During this melee, two torpedoes churned past Taney close aboard. The third wave mortally wounded USS Lansdale (DD-426), which later sank. All of the damaged vessels—save Paul Hamilton and Lansdale—reached Bizerte, Tunisia, on April 21. Taney later departed Bizerte with homeward-bound convoy GUS-38 and arrived at New York on May 21. Taney participated in two more round-trip convoy escort missions, with convoys UGS/GUS-45 and UGS/GUS-52. Detached as a unit of TF 66 on October 9, 1944, she sailed for the Boston Navy Yard soon thereafter for extensive yard work to convert her to an amphibious command ship. During this metamorphosis, Taney—classified as WAGC-37—was fitted with accommodations for an embarked flag officer and his staff, as well as with increased communicatio
Card to Gram 1
Card to Gram 1
Found among my great grandmother's keepsakes. I don't know how old I was, maybe 8 or 9, when I wrote this card. I had tried to fit my message on the postcard but was unsuccessful, so I made another card and mailed them to her together. I don't remember her answer as to whether she remembered the old bridge, but she must have, for the "new" Western Gateway Bridge wasn't built until the '20s. =============================================== From Austin Yates's "Schenectady County, New York" (1902) The old Mohawk bridge was built by the Mohawk and Hudson Turnpike Co. It was begun in 1806 and completed in 1809. The architect was Theodore, cousin of that gay and rascally Lothario, Vice President Aaron Burr. Theodore Burr was reputed to be the greatest bridge architect in America. David Hearsay was the builder. He was a mason by trade, lived by the bridge at the present residence of Ex-Judge Yates and with his eyes upon the work, day and night a magnificent job he made of it. When finished it was unsurpassed in beauty and solidity by any structure in America. It was erected on three massive piers whose greater size readily distinguished them from the others put in in 1835 -- an architectural blunder. it was really the first approach ever made to a suspension bridge. It was nine hundred feet in length in three lofty and magnificent spans, each of three hundred feet, made of two inch timbers of Norway pine. These spans were shingled to keep them from the weather. They were of enormous size, four feet thick by three broad. Had the great architect lived, this, his masterpiece, would be standing to-day. But it began to sag, the uprights rotted and on the dissolution of the M.&H. Turnpike Co., it was sold to capitalists whose misplaced economy neglected that watchful repairing so necessary to a wooden structure of this size, so that the uprights and interior timbers rotted. Meanwhile it had apparently sagged; four more piers were built under it, destroying plan and principle of structure so that the old bridge became a succession of hills and valleys. It had been covered over with a barn-like unpainted covering of rough hemlock boards, which, becoming weather beaten from the total absence of paint, made it in its old days a ghostly, ghastly tunnel over the river -- it could only be described as spooky. Menagerie elephants sometimes would not cross, and on one occasion in the early sixties, the whole town watched with delight while the elephants who refused to cross, sported with glee in the warm current on a hot summer day and had to be driven across by the steel hooks of the keepers. Meanwhile, David Hearsay living beside it, was the bridge keeper and guarded the creation of Burr's genius and his own handiwork with a heathen veneration. With him, for half a century, was old Christopher Beekman, better known as "Uncle Stoeffel," the friend and father of the Delta Phis of Old Union -- after them the pater-familias to every under-graduate. Uncle Stoeffel knew many great men in their youth and m any of the renowned of the land came to see him at commencement time. He was a quaint old German with laughable lapses of English, with a remarkably well educated cat as his inseparable companion. He was an ideal toll-taker. The cavernous old structure, as might well be imagined, was invested and infested at night by all the dissolute and disreputable vagabonds of both sexes in the city. He lived in the ramshackle old toll=house on the spot where the present structure stands, kept it scrupulously clean, slept with an eye and an ear always open. The ruffian whoever and however desperate he was, who persistently refused his toll or used a threatening word or movement, went down like a stricken ox under the hickory club always within reach . . . But the old bridge had to go. Glenville had bought it. District Attorney Fahn took the matter in hand, caused it to be indicted as a public nuisance. It was found guilty and ordered abated. Glenville, August 8th, 1873, . . . purchased the bridge and its equipments in behalf of said town, from William Van Vranken, as treasurer of the Mohawk Bridge Company, paying therefor $12,000 on behalf of the town and $600 made up by private subscription. The wooden structure was sold at auction in parcels and brought about $500. It was cut up for matches and the new iron structure took its place in 1874. While in process of demolition, after the covering was ripped off, returned in its last hours to the beauty of its youth.

austin city attorney
austin city attorney
The Innocent Woman (Steve Winslow Mystery, #6)
Steve Winslow didn’t understand. The young woman’s court appointed attorney didn’t cost her anything, the guy had just plea-bargained her petty-theft charge down to a suspended sentence with no time served and no fine, so why was she trying to fire him and hire Steve?
It was a great deal, except for one thing.
She happened to be innocent.

Series Titles - The Baxter Trust, The Anonymous Client,The Underground Man, The Naked Typist, The Wrong Gun, The Innocent Woman

Praise for the Steve Winslow Legal Mystery Series

"Highly entertaining courtroom drama." – Publisher’s Weekly

"Scenes out of court are good, but those taking place in court are superb." – Associated Press

"Flashy and great fun." – Kirkus Reviews

"Remindful of Perry Mason at his best." —Abilene Reporter News

"Brilliant courtroom scenes." —Drood Review of Mystery

Steve Winslow didn’t understand. The young woman’s court appointed attorney didn’t cost her anything, the guy had just plea-bargained her petty-theft charge down to a suspended sentence with no time served and no fine, so why was she trying to fire him and hire Steve?
It was a great deal, except for one thing.
She happened to be innocent.

Series Titles - The Baxter Trust, The Anonymous Client,The Underground Man, The Naked Typist, The Wrong Gun, The Innocent Woman

Praise for the Steve Winslow Legal Mystery Series

"Highly entertaining courtroom drama." – Publisher’s Weekly

"Scenes out of court are good, but those taking place in court are superb." – Associated Press

"Flashy and great fun." – Kirkus Reviews

"Remindful of Perry Mason at his best." —Abilene Reporter News

"Brilliant courtroom scenes." —Drood Review of Mystery