AVIATION EQUIPMENT LINE - AVIATION EQUIPMENT

AVIATION EQUIPMENT LINE - FREE USED MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - EVENT EQUIPMENT HIRE LONDON

Aviation Equipment Line


aviation equipment line
    equipment
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
  • Mental resources
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
    aviation
  • The flying or operating of aircraft
  • the aggregation of a country's military aircraft
  • the operation of aircraft to provide transportation
  • the art of operating aircraft
    line
  • be in line with; form a line along; "trees line the riverbank"
  • Hit a line drive
  • Mark or cover with lines
  • Stand or be positioned at intervals along
  • a formation of people or things one beside another; "the line of soldiers advanced with their bayonets fixed"; "they were arrayed in line of battle"; "the cast stood in line for the curtain call"
  • a mark that is long relative to its width; "He drew a line on the chart"
aviation equipment line - North American
North American Aviation P-51 Mustang (Osprey Production Line to Frontline 1)
North American Aviation P-51 Mustang (Osprey Production Line to Frontline 1)
Regarded as the finest US fighter of the World War II, the Mustang was built in astonishing numbers - 7956 P-51Ds alone - as the might of America's overwhelming industrial base swung into line behind the nation's global war effort. This new series follows the great fighter types of the conflict from the raw metal phase, through construction and testing, to the combat theatres of Europe, the Middle East, China/Burma/India and the Pacific. Using official and private archival black and white and colour material, all the facts behind the Mustang's construction are revealed. Complemented by an introductory text explaining the production processes involved and the evolution of the fighter, plus detailed photo captions, the professional images taken by North American Aviation's own photographic department set the scene for the later front line views captured by air and ground crews and USAAF photographers alike. The detailed appendices include comprehensive production batch lists of aircraft constructed during the war years, scale drawings illustrating all major types and a cutaway over a double page spread.

88% (17)
Army Aviation Museum, CH-37 Mojave nose open
Army Aviation Museum, CH-37 Mojave nose open
The Sikorsky CH-37 Mojave (company designation S-56) was a large heavy-lift helicopter by the standards of the 1950s. The S-56 came into being as an assault transport for the United States Marine Corps (USMC), with a capacity of 26 fully-equipped troops; the order was placed in 1951, the first prototype flew in 1953, and production deliveries of the HR2S began in July 1956 to the Marine Corps' HMX-1, sixty aircraft in total being produced. The United States Army evaluated the prototype in 1954 and ordered 94 examples as the CH-37A, the first being delivered also in summer 1956. All Marine and Army examples were delivered by mid-1960. Army examples were all upgraded to CH-37B status in the early 1960s, being given Lear auto-stabilization equipment and the ability to load and unload while hovering. In the 1962 unification of United States military aircraft designations, USMC examples became CH-37C. At the time of delivery, the CH-37 was the largest helicopter in the Western world, and it was Sikorsky's first twin-engined helicopter. Two Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engines were mounted in outboard pods that also contained the retractable landing gear. This left the fuselage free for cargo, which could be loaded and unloaded through large clamshell doors in the nose. The single main rotor was five-bladed, and designed to function with one blade shot away in combat. The CH-37 was one of the last heavy helicopters to use piston engines, which were larger, heavier and less powerful than the turboshafts subsequently employed. This accounted for the type's fairly short service life, all being withdrawn from service by the late 1960s, replaced in Army service by the distantly-related CH-54 Tarhe. Four CH-37Bs were deployed to Vietnam in 1963 to assist in the recovery of downed United States aircraft. They were very successful at this role, recovering over 7.5 million dollars' worth of equipment, some of which was retrieved from behind enemy lines.
Army Aviation Museum, BE-2C WWI
Army Aviation Museum, BE-2C WWI
The Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 (Bleriot Experimental) was a British single-engine two-seat biplane in service with the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) during World War I. About 3,500 were built, used as fighters, interceptors, light bombers, trainers and reconnaissance aircraft. A B.E.2a of No.2 Squadron RFC was the first aircraft of the Royal Flying Corps to arrive in France after the start of the First World War, on 26 August 1914. The B.E.2 was designed by Geoffrey de Havilland as a development of the B.E.1, and first flew in February 1912 with de Havilland as the test pilot. On 12 August 1912 it set a British altitude record of 10,560 ft (3,219 m). It started production as a reconnaissance machine, and two years later formed part of the equipment of three squadrons - squadrons equipped with a single type of aeroplane were still to come. These were all sent to France shortly after the outbreak of war. The early B.E.2a and b aircraft were replaced during 1915 by the B.E.2c, so extensively modified as to be virtually a new type, based on research by Edward Teshmaker Busk to develop an inherently stable aeroplane. The c began to be superseded by the final version, the B.E.2e, nicknamed the "Quirk", in 1916. Well into 1917 the last front-line B.E.2e was withdrawn, long after the type was obsolete. It continued in service throughout the war as a home defence fighter, in which role it was for a time a surprising success, and as a trainer. Some 3,500 B.E.2s were built by over 20 different manufacturers: an exact breakdown between the different models has never been produced, although the B.E.2c was almost certainly the most numerous.

aviation equipment line
aviation equipment line
TM 10-1670-300-20&P, US Army, Technical Manual, ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT FOR: MILITARY FREE-FALL SYSTEM, HELMET, FREE-FALL, PARACHUTISTS, TYPE I, HELMET, FREE-FALL, ... LINE, HARNESS, SINGLE POINT RELEASE ASSEMBLY
TM 10-1670-300-20&P, US Army, Technical Manual, ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT FOR: MILITARY FREE-FALL SYSTEM, HELMET, FREE-FALL, PARACHUTISTS, TYPE I, HELMET, FREE-FALL, PARACHUTISTS, TYPE II, GOGGLES, ALTIMETER, PARACHUTISTS, SLING ASSEMBLY, EQUIPMENT ATTACHING, LINE, EQUIPMENT LOWERING, RELEASE ASSEMBLY, RIPCORD, AUTOMATIC, TYPE FF2, RELEASE, AUTOMATIC RIPCORD, AR2, MODEL 451, DROP BAG, PARACHUTE W/7-FOOT LOWERING LINE, DROP BAG, PARACHUTE W/15-FOOT LOWERING LINE, HARNESS, SINGLE POINT RELEASE ASSEMBLY, 2004


SCOPE
This Technical Manual provides Unit maintenance instructions for Ancillary Military Free-Fall Equipment.
This equipment is used by Military Free-Fall qualified personnel.


Chapter 1. DESCRIPTION AND THEORY OF OPERATION
Equipment Description and Data
Description and Theory of Operation
CHAPTER 2. MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS
Service Upon Receipt
PMCS, Introduction
Preventive Maintenance Checks And Services
Unit Maintenance Introduction
Unit Maintenance Inspection
Unit Maintenance Airing
Unit Maintenance Cleaning And Drying
Unit Maintenance Salt/Fresh Water Contamination Test
Unit Maintenance Marking And Restenciling
Unit Maintenance Searing And Waxing
Unit Maintenance Sewing Procedures
Unit Maintenance Grommets
Unit Maintenance Helmet, Free Fall Parachutists Type I
Unit Maintenance Helmet, Free Fall Parachutists Type II
Unit Maintenance Goggles, Sun, Wind, and Dust
Unit Maintenance Altimeter
Unit Maintenance Sling Assembly, Equipment Attaching
Unit Maintenance Line, Equipment Lowering
Unit Maintenance Release Assembly Ripcord Automatic, Type FF2
Unit Maintenance Automatic Ripcord Release AR2 Jump/Off Switch
Unit Maintenance Power Cable Assembly Main/Reserve
Unit Maintenance Parachute Drop Bag
Unit Maintenance Harness, Single Point Release
Unit Maintenance Preparation For Storage
Unit Maintenance Preparation For Shipment
CHAPTER 3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION
References
Maintenance Allocation Chart (MAC) Introduction
Maintenance Allocation Chart
Repair Parts and Special Tools List (RPSTL) Introduction
RPSTL Group 1. Helmet, Parachutists Free Fall Type 1, Medium, and Large
RPSTL Group 2. Helmet, Parachutists Free Fall Type 2, Small, Medium, and Large
RPSTL Group 3. Goggles, Sun, Wind, and Dust
RPSTL Group 4. Altimeter, Barometer
RPSTL Group 5. Sling Assembly, Equipment Attaching
RPSTL Group 6. Line, Equipment Lowering, 8 Foot
RPSTL Group 7. Release Assembly, Ripcord, Automatic, Type FF2
RPSTL Group 8. FF2 Power Cable
RPSTL Group 9. Ripcord Release Assembly, Automatic, Model 451
RPSTL Group 10. Harness, Single Point Release
RPSTL Group 11. Parachute Drop Bag
Expendable/Durable Supplies And Materials List
Illustrated List Of Manufactured Items
National Stock Number Index
Part Number Index
Alphabetical Index

TM 10-1670-300-20&P, US Army, Technical Manual, ANCILLARY EQUIPMENT FOR: MILITARY FREE-FALL SYSTEM, HELMET, FREE-FALL, PARACHUTISTS, TYPE I, HELMET, FREE-FALL, PARACHUTISTS, TYPE II, GOGGLES, ALTIMETER, PARACHUTISTS, SLING ASSEMBLY, EQUIPMENT ATTACHING, LINE, EQUIPMENT LOWERING, RELEASE ASSEMBLY, RIPCORD, AUTOMATIC, TYPE FF2, RELEASE, AUTOMATIC RIPCORD, AR2, MODEL 451, DROP BAG, PARACHUTE W/7-FOOT LOWERING LINE, DROP BAG, PARACHUTE W/15-FOOT LOWERING LINE, HARNESS, SINGLE POINT RELEASE ASSEMBLY, 2004


SCOPE
This Technical Manual provides Unit maintenance instructions for Ancillary Military Free-Fall Equipment.
This equipment is used by Military Free-Fall qualified personnel.


Chapter 1. DESCRIPTION AND THEORY OF OPERATION
Equipment Description and Data
Description and Theory of Operation
CHAPTER 2. MAINTENANCE INSTRUCTIONS
Service Upon Receipt
PMCS, Introduction
Preventive Maintenance Checks And Services
Unit Maintenance Introduction
Unit Maintenance Inspection
Unit Maintenance Airing
Unit Maintenance Cleaning And Drying
Unit Maintenance Salt/Fresh Water Contamination Test
Unit Maintenance Marking And Restenciling
Unit Maintenance Searing And Waxing
Unit Maintenance Sewing Procedures
Unit Maintenance Grommets
Unit Maintenance Helmet, Free Fall Parachutists Type I
Unit Maintenance Helmet, Free Fall Parachutists Type II
Unit Maintenance Goggles, Sun, Wind, and Dust
Unit Maintenance Altimeter
Unit Maintenance Sling Assembly, Equipment Attaching
Unit Maintenance Line, Equipment Lowering
Unit Maintenance Release Assembly Ripcord Automatic, Type FF2
Unit Maintenance Automatic Ripcord Release AR2 Jump/Off Switch
Unit Maintenance Power Cable Assembly Main/Reserve
Unit Maintenance Parachute Drop Bag
Unit Maintenance Harness, Single Point Release
Unit Maintenance Preparation For Storage
Unit Maintenance Preparation For Shipment
CHAPTER 3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION
References
Maintenance Allocation Chart (MAC) Introduction
Maintenance Allocation Chart
Repair Parts and Special Tools List (RPSTL) Introduction
RPSTL Group 1. Helmet, Parachutists Free Fall Type 1, Medium, and Large
RPSTL Group 2. Helmet, Parachutists Free Fall Type 2, Small, Medium, and Large
RPSTL Group 3. Goggles, Sun, Wind, and Dust
RPSTL Group 4. Altimeter, Barometer
RPSTL Group 5. Sling Assembly, Equipment Attaching
RPSTL Group 6. Line, Equipment Lowering, 8 Foot
RPSTL Group 7. Release Assembly, Ripcord, Automatic, Type FF2
RPSTL Group 8. FF2 Power Cable
RPSTL Group 9. Ripcord Release Assembly, Automatic, Model 451
RPSTL Group 10. Harness, Single Point Release
RPSTL Group 11. Parachute Drop Bag
Expendable/Durable Supplies And Materials List
Illustrated List Of Manufactured Items
National Stock Number Index
Part Number Index
Alphabetical Index

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