ATTORNEYS IN ARIZONA : IN ARIZONA

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Attorneys In Arizona


attorneys in arizona
    attorneys
  • (attorney) lawyer: a professional person authorized to practice law; conducts lawsuits or gives legal advice
  • (Attorney) An alternate word for lawyers or "barrister & solicitor", used mostly in the USA. A person that has been trained in the law and that has been certified to give legal advice or to represent others in litigation.
  • A person appointed to act for another in business or legal matters
  • A lawyer
  • (attorney) In the United States, a lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession; An agent or representative authorized to act on someone else's behalf
    arizona
  • A state in the southwestern US, on the border with Mexico; pop. 5,130,632; capital, Phoenix; statehood, Feb. 14, 1912 (48). Part of New Spain until 1821, it was organized as a US territory in 1863 from lands ceded by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 and the Gadsden Purchase in 1853
  • The Arizona Beverage Company is a producer of various flavors of iced tea, juice cocktails and energy drinks from the United States, based in Woodbury, New York.http://www.drinkarizona.
  • a state in southwestern United States; site of the Grand Canyon
  • glossy snake
attorneys in arizona - The Fraternity:
The Fraternity: Lawyers and Judges in Collusion
The Fraternity: Lawyers and Judges in Collusion
As lawyer and judge for half a century, John Fitzgerald Molloy both profited from our legal system and saw how it has been altered in favor of lawyers, to the detriment of society. He shows that the legal profession has continuously re-shaped the law, in subtle but significant ways, to make legal services ever more necessary—and more lucrative for the Fraternity. The power the Fraternity now exercises, including the power to decide President Bush over Gore, has been accomplished by creating a new religion, that of worshiping the Constitution in ways the founders did not intend—with lawyers and judges the priests of that new religion. Molloy demonstrates terrible deficiencies in our legal system and presents practical solutions.>

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Legacy of Courage: Tolleson to honor desegregation history
Legacy of Courage: Tolleson to honor desegregation history
Tolleson to honor desegregation history Elementary district paying tribute to those who fought for equal rights in schools View photo by Michael Clawson PHOENIX CONSTRUCTION WORKER Humberto Valenzuela smooths out fresh cement March 16 at P.H. Gonzales Elementary School in Tolleson. The school is installing a tribute to desegregation in front of the school. Emily McCann staff writer Sixty years ago, children in Tolleson were separated at school by the color of their skin until a group of parents banded together to fight for equal rights. The Tolleson Elementary District will pay tribute at 6 p.m. Friday at Porfirio H. Gonzales Elementary, 9401 W. Garfield St., to the people and landmark decision that desegregated their schools. It started in 1949 when a 16-year-old boy, John "Juan" Camacho, challenged the district's policy to segregate pupils. He went before the school board, but saw no results. The next year, parents filed a lawsuit against the district with the help of three attorneys who donated their services, and Gonzales vs. Sheely was heard in the U.S. District Court of Arizona. On March 26, 1951, a judge ruled that segregation of children in separate buildings because of racial or national origin constitutes a denial of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed to petitioners as citizens of the United States. Goodyear resident Mary Ellen Gannon, 69, was in fourth grade when the decision was handed down. Her father, Porfirio Gonzales, was the lead plaintiff in the case. "My father was a very humble person," she said. "He and this group of people did what they had to do and never expected recognition. They were very brave and fought for what was right." One of the district's elementary schools was named after Gonzales, who died in 2006 at the age of 90. Now, a tribute panel sits in front of the campus to honor everyone involved. Part of it reads: "This memorial is dedicated to all the brave individuals that fought with great courage and humility to bring an end to the segregation of the Tolleson Elementary Schools. They believed in the spirit of the United States Constitution, that all children will be afforded the right to a truly equal education. Their legacy is a firm reminder that the fight for social justice continues." The people who signed the suit were John "Juan" Camacho, Cruz Gonzales de Contreras, Faustino Curiel, Isauro and Lupe Favela, Angelita Fuentes, Trinidad Gem Jr., Joe Gonzales, Porfirio Gonzales, Patsy Murrieta, Manuel Pena Sr. and Manuel "Lito" Pena Jr. The attorneys were Ralph Estrada, Greg Garcia and A.L. Wirin. The panel's wording was put together by a committee made up of their relatives and also community leaders who are well-versed with the history, including Mayor Adolfo Gamez. "It's very important that we remember this history in Tolleson and the people who sacrificed in many ways to make this a reality in terms of desegregation of the schools," Gamez said. "Most importantly is to remember that this is something that shouldn't happen again. That's the message we were trying to send, and make sure kids understand the history of this community." Multiple people have been invited to speak at the event, including a pupil from the district's JAG program and also a member of the Tolleson Teen Council. "Our youth speakers are symbolic of the power of the youth voice as agents of change," P.H. Gonzales Principal Juan Medrano said. A reception in the school cafeteria will follow the ceremony. The tribute panel was included with other major renovations made at P.H. Gonzales Elementary, including a new administration building and additional science, computer and math classrooms. The $2.9 million project added 11,800 square feet to the campus, which accommodates about 930 pupils. The district used bond and adjacent ways money. "We've been very active in upgrading technologies by bringing in Smart Boards and getting our kids better connected with more modern and advanced technologies, so this building here in terms of its wiring capabilities, supports that much better than our old building did," Medrano said. Emily McCann can be reached by e-mail at emccann@westvalleyview.com. Leonardo A. Gem Group & Corporate Director 888-533-1813 602-403-2602 *www.AcrossArizonaTours.com*
Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) westbound train led by General Electric (GE) C40-8W locomotive 804 at the Arizona Divide, west of Flagstaff, Coconino County, in northern Arizona, summer of 1999
Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) westbound train led by General Electric (GE) C40-8W locomotive 804 at the Arizona Divide, west of Flagstaff, Coconino County, in northern Arizona, summer of 1999
(C) 2009 Ivan Safyan Abrams. All rights reserved. Pulling a train of empty container platforms, a Santa Fe C40-8W and an SD-40-2 are just cresting the summit of the Arizona Divide, west of Flagstaff, Arizona. Summer of 1999. The surrounding forest is reputed to be the largest stand of Ponderosa Pines in the world.

attorneys in arizona
attorneys in arizona
An Imperfect Love
When divorce attorney Justin Abernathy decides to get married despite his disillusionment with love, his announcement that he's seeking a sensible and practical wife sends his secretary, Alisa McClenaghan, into whoops of laughter -- until she discovers that she is the bride he's chosen.

When divorce attorney Justin Abernathy decides to get married despite his disillusionment with love, his announcement that he's seeking a sensible and practical wife sends his secretary, Alisa McClenaghan, into whoops of laughter -- until she discovers that she is the bride he's chosen.