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family law raleigh
    family law
  • Family Law is a television drama starring Kathleen Quinlan as a divorced lawyer who attempted to start her own law firm after her lawyer husband took all their old clients. The show aired on CBS from 1999 to 2002. The show was created by Paul Haggis.
  • Family law is an area of the law that deals with family-related issues and domestic relations including: *the nature of marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships; *issues arising during marriage, including spousal abuse, legitimacy, adoption, surrogacy, child abuse, and child abduction *
  • Family Law (Derecho de familia) (2006) is an Argentine, French, Italian, and Spanish, comedy-drama film, written and directed by Daniel Burman.
    raleigh
  • English courtier (a favorite of Elizabeth I) who tried to colonize Virginia; introduced potatoes and tobacco to England (1552-1618)
  • The Raleigh Amtrak Station, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, is served by three passenger trains, the Silver Star, Piedmont and Carolinian. The street address is 320 West Cabarrus Street, and is located just to the southwest of downtown Raleigh.
  • The capital of North Carolina, in the east central part of the state; pop. 276,093
  • capital of the state of North Carolina; located in the east central part of the North Carolina
family law raleigh - The Stones
The Stones Cry Out (A Raleigh Harmon Novel)
The Stones Cry Out (A Raleigh Harmon Novel)
When nobody talks... the stones cry out.

During a rally in the searing heat of a Virginia summer, two men plummet from a building into the crowd below. The victims are a white police officer and a young black man with a troubled past. And though hundreds of people stood at the scene, nobody saw what happened. Or are they just not talking? FBI agent Raleigh Harmon, one of Richmond's own, has to solve the case—fast.

The Bureau wants a quick verdict, with or without the truth. But with tight-lipped witnesses, Raleigh must rely on her instincts and her training in forensic geology to uncover the facts. Working her connections with the city's powerful families and its seedy underbelly, Raleigh is determined to see justice prevail. Will she solve the case before the growing racial unrest rages out of control? Or will her choices ultimately bring down everyone involved—including Raleigh herself?

"With a riveting story line, fascinating forensic science, and a pungent portrayal of the grimy side of Richmond, Virginia, The Stones Cry Out holds the reader in its powerful grip until the very last word. Sibella Giorello writes like a seasoned pro. No mystery lover should pass up this novel."
--Fred Chappell, author of I Am One of You Forever

"In an exceptionally skillful debut, Sibella Giorello brings to life forensic geologist Raleigh Harmon, a heroine who is surefooted in grisly crime scenes but feeling her way along the intertwining paths of life, love, and faith. Readers will follow her eagerly through this adventure and hope for more to come."
--Ann McMillan, author of Civil Blood

When nobody talks... the stones cry out.

During a rally in the searing heat of a Virginia summer, two men plummet from a building into the crowd below. The victims are a white police officer and a young black man with a troubled past. And though hundreds of people stood at the scene, nobody saw what happened. Or are they just not talking? FBI agent Raleigh Harmon, one of Richmond's own, has to solve the case—fast.

The Bureau wants a quick verdict, with or without the truth. But with tight-lipped witnesses, Raleigh must rely on her instincts and her training in forensic geology to uncover the facts. Working her connections with the city's powerful families and its seedy underbelly, Raleigh is determined to see justice prevail. Will she solve the case before the growing racial unrest rages out of control? Or will her choices ultimately bring down everyone involved—including Raleigh herself?

"With a riveting story line, fascinating forensic science, and a pungent portrayal of the grimy side of Richmond, Virginia, The Stones Cry Out holds the reader in its powerful grip until the very last word. Sibella Giorello writes like a seasoned pro. No mystery lover should pass up this novel."
--Fred Chappell, author of I Am One of You Forever

"In an exceptionally skillful debut, Sibella Giorello brings to life forensic geologist Raleigh Harmon, a heroine who is surefooted in grisly crime scenes but feeling her way along the intertwining paths of life, love, and faith. Readers will follow her eagerly through this adventure and hope for more to come."
--Ann McMillan, author of Civil Blood

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Mordecai House - Raleigh, North Carolina
Mordecai House - Raleigh, North Carolina
The Mordecai House (also called the Mordecai Plantation Manor or Mordecai Mansion), built in 1785, is a registered historical landmark and museum in Raleigh, North Carolina that is the centerpiece of Mordecai Historic Park, right outside the Historic Oakwood neighborhood. It is the oldest residence in Raleigh on its original foundation. In addition to the house, the Park includes other attractions such as the original birthplace of President Andrew Johnson, the Ellen Mordecai Garden, the Badger-Iredell Law Office, Allen Kitchen and St. Mark's Chapel, a popular site for weddings. The oldest portion of the house was built by Joel Lane for his son, Henry. At one time, the home was the center of a 5,000-acre (20 km2) plantation and one of the largest farms in Wake County. The house was named after Moses Mordecai, who married Henry Lane's daughters. The first daughter, Margaret, died and so Mordecai married her sister Ann. In 1824, Mordecai hired William Nichols, State Architect at the time, to enlarge the house. The addition was considered a significant work of Nichols, who had also been responsible for remodeling the original building containing the State House. With the addition of the four new rooms in 1826, the Mordecai house was transformed into a Greek Revival mansion. The Mordecai family was prominent in local and state affairs. Jacob, Moses' father, founded a girls' school in Warrenton, North Carolina. Moses was a prominent lawyer and member of the 1805 Court of Conference. Moses Mordecai had two sons, Henry and Jacob, and one daughter, Ellen, by his first wife and one daughter, Margaret, by his second. Henry was a prosperous planter at Mordecai House and served in the State Legislature. His daughter Margaret and her descendants owned and occupied Mordecai House until 1967. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, portions of land owned by the Mordecai family helped Raleigh's expansion as a city. In 1867, George Washington Mordecai donated land east of the city to establish a Confederate cemetery and another plot became Wake County's first Hebrew Cemetery. The adjacent Oakwood Cemetery, chartered in 1869, eventually lent its name to the large suburb that developed in the adjoining wooded land, earlier known as Mordecai Grove. In 1974, Oakwood became the first neighborhood in Raleigh to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Property owned by the Mordecai family continued until 1967, when the house and its surrounding block were put on the market. Local preservationists protested and the city purchased the property, turning it over to the Raleigh Historic Sites Commission to supervise and develop as a historic park. The commission was able to obtain many original Mordecai furnishings, as well as preserve the family papers and library. Mordecai Square Historic Park is now managed by the City of Raleigh's Parks and Recreation Department. The Mordecai House is a designated Raleigh Historic Landmark
The ceiling in Lismore Cathedral
The ceiling in Lismore Cathedral
I appreciate that this represents something of a departure from my normal postings....but bear with me please! This is a shot of the ceiling of St. Carthage's Cathedral in Lismore, County Waterford. As far as I can find out this beautiful plaster work dates from 1812-1814, although of course the Cathedral itself goes back much further than that. Indeed, the first Cathedral was built on this site by St. Carthage in 636. It is full of historical connections, including one with Sir Walter Raleigh, who, in 1589, leased the Bishop's Palace (now Lismore Castle) for a rent of ?12 a year from the then Bishop of Lismore Miler McGrath. Raleigh had taken part in the suppression of the Desmond rebellion in Ireland in 1579 and benefited from the subsequent distribution of confiscated land. He owned over 42,000 acres included the town of Lismore itself and also the neighbouring town of Youghal. He was Mayor of Youghal in 1588 and 1589. The 1590s saw a decline in Raleigh’s fortunes and he sold his Irish estates in 1602. They were purchased by Richard Boyle one of the most successful men of his period for the sum of ?1,500. Boyle had arrived in Ireland in 1588 aged 22, with ?27 in his pocket, a diamond ring, a bracelet, and the clothes he stood up in but, by the time of his death in 1644, he had amassed enormous wealth. In the interim he had also become the Earl of Cork. He and his second wife had seven daughters and seven sons the most famous being Robert Boyle, the philosopher and father of modern chemistry, who was born at Lismore in 1626. When the 4th Earl of Cork died, without male heirs in 1753 the ownership passed to his eldest daughter Lady Charlotte who had married the 4th Duke of Devonshire in 1748. It thus passed to the Devonshire family who still own it, along with, I understand, the best part of Westminster in London!

family law raleigh
family law raleigh
Soviet Baby Boomers: An Oral History of Russia's Cold War Generation (Oxford Oral History)
Donald Raleigh's Soviet Baby Boomers traces the collapse of the Soviet Union and the transformation of Russia into a modern, highly literate, urban society through the fascinating life stories of the country's first post-World War II, Cold War generation.

For this book, Raleigh has interviewed sixty 1967 graduates of two "magnet" secondary schools that offered intensive instruction in English, one in Moscow and one in provincial Saratov. Part of the generation that began school the year the country launched Sputnik into space, they grew up during the Cold War, but in a Soviet Union increasingly distanced from the excesses of Stalinism. In this post-Stalin era, the Soviet leadership dismantled the Gulag, ruled without terror, promoted consumerism, and began to open itself to an outside world still fearful of Communism. Raleigh is one of the first scholars of post-1945 Soviet history to draw extensively on oral history, a particularly useful approach in studying a country where the boundaries between public and private life remained porous and the state sought to peer into every corner of people's lives. During and after the dissolution of the USSR, Russian citizens began openly talking about their past, trying to make sense of it, and Raleigh has made the most of this new forthrightness. He has created an extraordinarily rich composite narrative and embedded it in larger historical narratives of Cold War, de-Stalinization, "overtaking" America, opening up to the outside world, economic stagnation, dissent, emigration, the transition to a market economy, the transformation of class, ethnic, and gender relations, and globalization.

Including rare photographs of daily life in Cold War Russia, Soviet Baby Boomers offers an intimate portrait of a generation that has remained largely faceless until now.

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