KENTUCKY CRIMINAL ATTORNEY : CRIMINAL ATTORNEY

KENTUCKY CRIMINAL ATTORNEY : DEBT COLLECTION LAWYERS : DEFENSE ATTORNEYS.

Kentucky Criminal Attorney


kentucky criminal attorney
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  • A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is "a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law.
    kentucky
  • a state in east central United States; a border state during the American Civil War; famous for breeding race horses
  • The Commonwealth of Kentucky is a state located in the East Central United States of America. As classified by the United States Census Bureau, Kentucky is a Southern state. Kentucky is one of four U.S.
  • A state in the southeastern US; pop. 4,041,769; capital, Frankfort; statehood, June 1, 1792 (15). Ceded by the French to the British in 1763 and then to the US in 1783 by the Treaty of Paris, it was explored by Daniel Boone
  • Kentucky is a 1938 Technicolor film with Loretta Young, Richard Greene, and Walter Brennan. It was directed by David Butler.
kentucky criminal attorney - Moving Mountains:
Moving Mountains: How One Woman and Her Community Won Justice from Big Coal
Moving Mountains: How One Woman and Her Community Won Justice from Big Coal
Deep in the heart of the southern West Virginia coalfields, one of the most important environmental and social empowerment battles in the nation has been waged for the past decade. Fought by a heroic woman struggling to save her tiny community through a landmark lawsuit, this battle, which led all the way to the halls of Congress, has implications for environmentally conscious people across the world. The story begins with Patricia Bragg in the tiny community of Pie. When a deep mine drained her neighbors' wells, Bragg heeded her grandmother's admonition to "fight for what you believe in" and led the battle to save their drinking water. Though she and her friends quickly convinced state mining officials to force the coal company to provide new wells, Bragg's fight had only just begun. Soon large-scale mining began on the mountains behind her beloved hollow. Fearing what the blasting off of mountaintops would do to the humble homes below, she joined a lawsuit being pursued by attorney Joe Lovett, the first case he had ever handled. In the case against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Bragg v. Robertson), federal judge Charles Haden II shocked the coal industry by granting victory to Joe Lovett and Patricia Bragg and temporarily halting the practice of mountaintop removal. While Lovett battled in court, Bragg sought other ways to protect the resources and safety of coalfield communities, all the while recognizing that coal mining was the lifeblood of her community, even of her own family (her husband is a disabled miner). The years of Bragg v. Robertson bitterly divided the coalfields and left many bewildered by the legal wrangling. One of the state's largest mines shut down because of the case, leaving hardworking miners out of work, at least temporarily. Despite hurtful words from members of her church, Patricia Bragg battled on, making the two-hour trek to the legislature in Charleston, over and over, to ask for better controls on mine blasting. There Bragg and her friends won support from delegate Arley Johnson, himself a survivor of one of the coalfield's greatest disasters. Award-winning investigative journalist Penny Loeb spent nine years following the twists and turns of this remarkable story, giving voice both to citizens, like Patricia Bragg, and to those in the coal industry. Intertwined with court and statehouse battles is Patricia Bragg's own quiet triumph of graduating from college summa cum laude in her late thirtie and moving her family out of welfare and into prosperity and freedom from mining interests. Bragg's remarkable personal triumph and the victories won in Pie and other coalfield communities will surprise and inspire readers.

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An Executed Murderer's Grave in the Crayne Cemetery in Crayne, Kentucky
An Executed Murderer's Grave in the Crayne Cemetery in Crayne, Kentucky
This is a photo that I took of the grave of Kelley Moss, a convicted murderer who was put to death in Kentucky's electric chair. Moss was convicted and sentenced to death for the violent murder of his elderly stepfather in 1957. Moss was executed in 1962. Observers reported that Moss had to be forcibly removed from the death watch cell and that the attending guards had to wrestle him and hold him down while he was being strapped to the electric chair. They also noted that just before the hood was placed over his head, that tears could be seen rolling down his cheeks. His body was released to the family and his funeral was held in the Crayne Presbyterian Church in the tiny community of Crayne, Kentucky. His body was placed in a wooden coffin that was constructed by inmates and lined with straw. He was then laid to rest in the Crayne Cemetery in a grave that remained unmarked until 1997. Moss was the last man executed in Kentucky until 1997 when Harold McQueen was put to death by electrocution. Moss lies buried next to his mother, whose grave was also unmarked until 1997. The following is an article from the "Henderson Gleaner," detailing Moss' troubled life: At times, Kelly MOSS seemed the very incarnation of trouble. The Henderson County native apparently spent much of his life drifting in and out of jail - a breach-of-peace charge here, an assault conviction there - and had compiled an imposing criminal record before murder led to his death in the electric chair at age 47. MOSS was arrested at least 10 times between 1950 and 1953 and, by the time Henderson Circuit Judge Faust Y. SIMPSON ordered him to leave the county in January 1954, his reputation as a persistent felon was well-documented. According to The Gleaner and Journal, MOSS had been away from Henderson County for about three years when he was arrested in Webster County on a robbery charge and sent to the Kentucky State Penitentiary at Eddyville. The day after his release on September 22, 1957, MOSS and his wife, Dorothy Osborne MOSS, were lodged in the Henderson County jail on charges of drunkenness. Finally, in early November 1957, the badly beaten body of MOSS' 74-year-old stepfather was found in the kitchen of his home on Cumnock Street. MOSS was convicted of the slaying in May 1958 and was sentenced to die in the electric chair on January 6, 1961. But for all the energy MOSS seemingly had expended to seek his own destruction, the convicted murderer now unleashed a flurry of legal maneuvers - many without the help of an attorney - in an effort to prevent his own death. MOSS managed to delay the execution for slightly more than a year. In the end, the U.S. Supreme Court would refuse three times to hear the case. The Kentucky Court of Appeals also denied three last-minute petitions to postpone the execution. No Kentuckian has been executed since March 2, 1962, the day MOSS was put to death at the Eddyville prison. "The restless spirit of Kelly MOSS was stilled just after midnight this morning … when the state carried out his execution for the 1957 slaying of his step-father, 74-year-old Charles ABBITT, in a small frame house on Cumnock Street," the newspaper reported. "MOSS … held onto his hope for a stay of execution until the last but it did not come. MOSS has fought his legal battles for four years, recently without an attorney. Not an educated man, he was credited with having a good mind and he prepared many of his writs himself. He was also credited with preparing writs for fellow prisoners when in custody on earlier occasions for less serious offences." At one point, MOSS filed a $10,000 civil suit against the state and various officials, claiming he was injured when guards at Eddyville threw tear gas into his cell. The lawsuit was accompanied by a petition requesting the court to stay the execution. MOSS "contended the action of the guards amounted to an attempted execution by gas and that the impending execution would place him in double jeopardy," the newspaper said. "His suit was thrown out of a lower court and the Court of Appeals has ruled against his double jeopardy contention." The day before MOSS' execution, the newspaper published a letter - parts of which are written in a helpless and bitter tone - addressed to Editor Francele ARMSTRONG from Kelly MOSS' mother, Edna Moss ABBITT. It read, in part: "After reading a serious of southwestern reporter (legal journals) in the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky vs. Kelly MOSS, I find that there are many untrue statements contained therein. I find that the evidence contained in Kelly's case is far-fetched in many ways. "And you, being the editor, I suppose you are someone else who has published (this information) in the Gleaner and Journal newspaper over and over again. "And every article that you put in the Gleaner and Journal was … about my son Kelly MOSS (whom) you certainly do not know anything ab
"Tireless Tenacity"- life of a courtroom wildcat
"Tireless Tenacity"- life of a courtroom wildcat
Commonwealth Attorney Ray Larson, (aka: "Ray the D.A.") and one of his super-sharp prosecutors leaving the courtroom, marching back to their legal-lockerroom to scour their criminal scouting reports, watch surveillance gametape, and put together their next gameplan....I swear I think he's dragging a Red-Bull iv-drip in that giant briefcase. ALWAYS on the move. Standing through court procedings like a true Kentucky Courtroom Wildcat, poised to strike at the first detected opening in the defense's case... ****PERSONAL NOTE: Even though Ray's ambitious vigor is occassionally directed to shoot down my defendant release recommendations as a Pretrial Officer, I couldn't find his personal attributes more admirable. Ray has a tireless tenacity, he's driven, exudes a solemnity and earnest sense of duty, striving for Justice for the Bluegrass' victims and their families.****

kentucky criminal attorney
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