THE AWNING COMPANY. THE AWNING

The awning company. Canopy for queen bed. Memphis shades fats 21

The Awning Company


the awning company
    company
  • an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
  • Accompany (someone)
  • Associate with; keep company with
  • small military unit; usually two or three platoons
  • be a companion to somebody
    awning
  • An awning or overhang is a secondary covering attached to the exterior wall of a building. It is typically composed of canvas woven of acrylic, cotton or polyester yarn, or vinyl laminated to polyester fabric that is stretched tightly over a light structure of aluminium, iron or steel, possibly
  • A sheet of canvas or other material stretched on a frame and used to keep the sun or rain off a storefront, window, doorway, or deck
  • (awned) having awns i.e. bristlelike or hairlike appendages on the flowering parts of some cereals and grasses; "awned wheatgrass"
  • a canopy made of canvas to shelter people or things from rain or sun
the awning company - Awning Cleaning
Awning Cleaning Business
Awning Cleaning Business
Upstart Business Consulting Group creates comprehensive business plan kits for a variety of businesses and industries. When you purchase one of our business plan kits, you will have access to the tools that will allow you to be an entrepreneur. We only create business plan kits for businesses that can capitalize on current trends and consumer demand. All businesses we cover require an initial start-up capital investment of $1,000 to $10,000. Although the required start-up capital is relatively small, you will have the potential for substantial cash flow and a high return on investment. The format of the business plan kits are modeled after business plans that have been used in successful start-up companies. These business plan kits are for those individuals who want a better work/life balance, want the flexibility, pride, and fulfillment that comes with being an entrepreneur, and want to earn extra income.

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International Mercantile Marine Company Building
International Mercantile Marine Company Building
Financial District, Manhattan The International Mercantile Marine Company Building occupies a prominent and historic location at the south end of Broadway, facing both Bowling Green and Battery Park, on a lot that extends along the entire blockfront of Battery Place to Greenwich Street. The austere neo-classical style building is the result of a remodelling of the renowned red brick, Queen Anne style Washington Building (designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1882-87) by Walter B. Chambers in 1919-21. Chambers, an architect trained at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts who was an associate of Ernest Flagg, is known for designs that reflect an interest in severity and simplicity of composition and details. In the re-design of the Washington Building for the International Mercantile Marine Co., the tower and dormers were removed, the roof profile was altered, and the structure reclad in Indiana limestone, granite, and marble. The International Mercantile Marine Co., organized in 1902 by J.P. Morgan, was a mammoth and ambitious combination of six of the leading American and British transatlantic steamship companies that operated the largest American-owned merchant fleet in the world. This building, which served as the company's New York headquarters as well as its booking office, was one of the first of the major modern steamship buildings that gave this section of lower Broadway the name "Steamship Row" in the 1920s and assisted in transforming the street into the "canyon" of neo-classical masonry office towers familiar to this day. Restrained neo-classical details on this building include nautical and marine motifs, such as shields representing the company's major ports of call. In 1943 the International Mercantile Marine Co. merged with its then-principal subsidiary and became the United States Lines Co., which retained ownership of No. Broadway until 1979. The Allstate Life Insurance Co., owners since 1992, funded a major restoration the exterior in 1993-94. The site of the International Mercantile Marine Co. Building was occupied in the seventeenth century by two taverns, popular for their location just north of Fort New Amsterdam. In the mid-eighteenth century, when lower Broadway was a desirable residential street for the wealthy and for government officials, John Watts and Capt. Archibald Kennedy built houses on this site. Kennedy's house served during the Revolutionary War as quarters for a number of British officers (and, legend says, for George Washington). It remained a residence (in the 1830s-40s for prominent early banker Nathaniel Prime) until about 1851, when it became known as the Washington Hotel; the hotel stayed in operation until its demolition for the Washington Building, the predecessor of the present building. A bronze tablet on the Broadway corner of the International Mercantile Marine Co. Building commemorates this site history. The International Mercantile Marine Company The International Mercantile Marine Co. (IMMC), organized in 1902 by J.P. Morgan, was a mammoth and ambitious combination of six of the leading American and British transatlantic steamship companies. During its forty years of existence it operated the largest American-owned merchant fleet in the world. The nucleus of the company was the International Navigation Co., originally chartered in Philadelphia in 1871 (and reorganized in 1893 in New Jersey), which owned and operated the American and Red Star Lines.3 IMMC amended the charter of this predecessor company, changed its name, and initially increased its capital from fifteen million dollars to sixty million dollars; the stock in the new company was already paid for and subscribed at the time of the formation announcement in October 1902 (the company soon reached a capitalization of $120 million). International Navigation controlled International Navigation Co., Ltd., a separate company set up to indirectly acquire several British properties — the Oceanic Navigation Co., Ltd. (White Star Line), the Atlantic Transport Co., and the Dominion Line. The subsidiary companies thus included in the combination were the American, Red Star, White Star, Atlantic Transport, and Dominion Lines, wholly owned by the company, as well as Frederick Ley land & Co. and National Steamship Co., in which IMMC secured a majority ownership. In addition, IMMC purchased a substantial share in the Holland-America Line (which was sold in 1917). These passenger and freight lines operated between North America and Europe, Australia-New Zealand, the Caribbean, and Central America. The first president in 1902 and then chairman of the board (1904-12), Clement A. Griscom, was one of the wealthiest men in the United States and had been one of the founders of International Navigation in 1871. J. Bruce Ismay, a director of the White Star Line, succeeded Griscom as president (1904-12). IMMC, formed at the peak of transatlantic shipping prosperity, continually operated
International Mercantile Marine Company Building
International Mercantile Marine Company Building
One Bowling Green, Financial District, Manhattan The International Mercantile Marine Company Building occupies a prominent and historic location at the south end of Broadway, facing both Bowling Green and Battery Park, on a lot that extends along the entire blockfront of Battery Place to Greenwich Street. The austere nea-classical style building is the result of a remodelling of the renowned red brick, Queen Anne style Washington Building (designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1882-87) by Walter B. Chambers in 1919-21. Chambers, an architect trained at the Ecole des Beaux• Arts who was an associate of Ernest Flagg, is known for designs that reflect an interest in severity and simplicity of composition and details. In the re-design of the Washington Building for the International Mercantile Marine Co., the tower and dormers were removed, the roof profile was altered, and the structure reclad in Indiana limestone, granite, and marble. The International Mercantile Marine Co., organized in 1902 by J.P. Morgan, was a mammoth and ambitious combination of six of the leading American and British transatlantic steamship companies that operated the largest American owned merchant fleet in the world. This building, which served as the company's New York headquarters as well as its booking office, was one of the first of the major modern steamship buildings that gave this section of lower Broadway the name "Steamship Row" in the 1920s and assisted in transforming the street into the "canyon" of neo-classical masonry office towers familiar to this day. Restrained neo-classical details on this building include nautical and marine motifs, such as shields representing the company's major ports of call. In 1943 the International Mercantile Marine Co. merged with its then-principal subsidiary and became the United States Lines Co., which retained ownership of No.1 Broadway until 1979. The Allstate Life Insurance Co., owners since 1992, funded a major restoration of the exterior in 1993-94. The International Mercantile Marine Co. Building is located at the south end of Broadway, facing both Bowling Green and Battery Park on a lot that extends along the entire blockfront of Battery Place to Greenwich Street. A thirteen-story 17 neo-classical structure, it is clad in Indiana limestone (with marble spandrel panels) above a granite base. The three facades have similar articulation, with chamfered corners at the southeast and southwest. The masonry cladding of the structure, seriously deteriorated, was restored in 1993-94; the work entailed replacement (around eight percent of the total), repair, resetting, re-anchoring, and waterproofing of the limestone and marble. Base The base has double-story arched fenestration. The mUlti-pane window sash, with lights following the arch, are kalamein with a painted gold finish and have ornamental entablatures. Semi-domical awnings have been placed in many of the arches (since 1981). The cornice has dentils and a course with a wave motif. Broadway The central main entrance, with a pedimented surround, has spandrels with the figures of Neptune and Mercury (Gods of the Seas and Trade) as well as an American eagle, and is further embellished with seashells, seaweed, and starfish; an original white marble plaque (previously covered by a sign with the name of the company) now has the inscription "Number One" for the address. A bronze tablet on the southern corner commemorates the early history of this site. The southernmost bay, on the northern reveal, bears the inscription "Walter B. Chambers Archt. MCMXXI." An historic lamp sconce is placed between each of the two end bays. Alterations were made over the years to the northern three bays: I) the northern bay (originally an entrance to the elevator hall) had two metal and glass doors flanked by sidelights, and currently has one metal and glass door (placed at the south side of the bay) and storefront window (1982-83); 2) the second bay originally had a multi-pane window with a limestone and granite base (similar to those surviving in the southern two bays), and c. 1981 the base was removed and two metal and glass doors flanked by sidelights were inserted; and 3) the main entrance, which originally had a revolving door, was altered before 1965 to incorporate a display window flanked by sidelights, and currently has a revolving door flanked by sidelights (c. 1981). All newer metalwork has an anodized gold finish. Battery Place Two pedimented entrances set within the arches of the second bay from each end, 5 once entrances to the booking office and designated "First Class" and "Cabin Class," are ornamented with shields with the inscription "IMM" flanked by dolphins; they originally had revolving doors with Sidelights and currently have anodized aluminum and glass doors with transoms (1981); the western entrance is recessed and has granite steps and scissor gates

the awning company
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