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Garage Floor Tiles Reviews


garage floor tiles reviews
    floor tiles
  • (Floor tile) A ceramic, glazed or unglazed paver, quarry or mosaic tile resistant to abrasion and impact.
  • Glazed or unglazed or natural stone tiles of sufficient strength, impact and abrasion resistance to withstand the weight and wear of foot traffic.
    reviews
  • (review) reappraisal: a new appraisal or evaluation
  • (review) an essay or article that gives a critical evaluation (as of a book or play)
  • A formal assessment or examination of something with the possibility or intention of instituting change if necessary
  • A critical appraisal of a book, play, movie, exhibition, etc., published in a newspaper or magazine
  • A periodical publication with critical articles on current events, the arts, etc
  • (review) look at again; examine again; "let's review your situation"
    garage
  • an outbuilding (or part of a building) for housing automobiles
  • Put or keep (a motor vehicle) in a garage
  • keep or store in a garage; "we don't garage our car"
  • a repair shop where cars and trucks are serviced and repaired

Isaac L. & Julia B. Rice House
Isaac L. & Julia B. Rice House
Yeshiva Ketana of Manhattan, Riverside Drive, Upper West Side, Manhattan The imposing Isaac L. Rice Mansion, built in 1901-03, is one of two freestanding mansions to survive on Riverside Drive. As such it is a reminder of the period in the early 20th century when Riverside Drive was lined by elegant single-family residences, serving as the West Side counterpart to Fifth Avenue on the East Side. Impressively sited, the Rice mansion was designed by the noted theater architects Herts & Tallant and is one of their rare residential commissions in New York City. While it features elements of neo-Georgian and Beaux-Arts design, the mansion displays the highly individualistic character which Herts & Tallant brought to residential architecture. While Riverside Park and Riverside Drive had been planned by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1873, construction of the park and roadway continued until 1898. The presence of the park and drive as well as that of the Ninth Avenue elevated railroad--opened in 1879--were an incentive to the development of the West Side which was carried out primarily between 1885 and 1900. While the first stages of West Side development were concentrated on the side streets, development also began about 1885 on the choice and higher-priced lots facing Riverside Drive itself. By 1900 there were approximately 135 single-family residences located along Riverside Drive. While most were rowhouses, approximately 30 were freestanding residences commissioned by a specific client from an architect. In 1899 Isaac L. Rice purchased the site on the southwest corner of 89th Street and Riverside Drive for his mansion from William W. Hall, a prominent builder and real estate developer active on both the East and West Sides during this period. Earlier that year the site for the Soldiers and Sailors Monument (1900-02, Stoughton & Stoughton and Paul Duboy), a designated New York City Landmark, just across the drive, had finally been chosen, Just north of 89th Street on the drive were two residences commissioned by members of the unrelated Clark families who had done much to aid development on the Upper West Side. Elizabeth Scriven Clark, the widow of Alfred Corning Clark and later wife of Henry Codman Potter, Episcopal bishop of New York, built her house at 89th Street in 1898-99 from designs by Ernest Flagg, while Cyrus Clark, honored with a plaque in Riverside Park as the "the father of the West Side," had built his house at 90th Street in 1887 from designs by Henry F. Kilburn. Both have now been replaced by apartment buildings. Isaac L. Rice (1850-1915), born in Bavaria, Germany, immigrated to the United States as a child with his parents. After studying in the schools of Philadelphia and then in Paris, he began to write and teach, publishing a book entitled What Is Music? in 1875. Turning his attention to the study of law, he graduated from Columbia Law School in 1880. He became counsel to several railroads which were in a period of reorganization and made his fortune with the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad.. As an early promoter of electrical inventions he became president of the Electric Storage Battery Co. in 1897, founded the Electric Vehicle Co. in 1896, and also the Electric Boat Co. In keeping with his early literary interests, Rice established the Forum, a political and literary review, in 1885. Rice was also a noted chess player who invented an opening called the "Rice gambit." In 1885 he married Julia Hyneman Barnett. His tribute to her was to name the new family residence "Villa Julia." Julia Barnett Rice (I860-?) was a notable figure in her own right. Born in New Orleans, she studied medicine at the Women's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, receiving an M.D. degree in 1885. Although she never practiced medicine, her concern for hospital patients suffering from excessive noise on the boats plying the East River led her to found the Society for the Suppression of Unnecessary Noise. Not only was a bill passed to regulate the boat whistles of river traffic, but quiet zones were established around city hospitals. To design their new residence the Rices commissioned the architectural firm of Herts & Tallant which at that time was just beginning to make its reputation in theater architecture. Henry B. Herts (1871-1933) and Hugh Tallant (1870-1952) had met while students at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris from which Tallant had received a medal of honor in 1896. Herts, a talented painter, also exhibited at the Paris Salon. Upon returning to New York the two formed a partnership in 1897. Their first commission was to refurbish and to add an extension to the Harmonie Club, 45 West 42nd Street (now demolished). Isaac Rice had been a member of this exclusive German-Jewish club since 1885, His firsthand knowledge of Herts & Tallant's work for the club was undoubtedly a factor which led him to give them the commission for his residence. The firm ha
Isaac L. Rice Mansion
Isaac L. Rice Mansion
Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The imposing Isaac L. Rice Mansion, built in 1901-03, is one of two freestanding mansions to survive on Riverside Drive. As such it is a reminder of the period in the early 20th century when Riverside Drive was lined by elegant single-family residences, serving as the West Side counterpart to Fifth Avenue on the East Side. Impressively sited, the Rice mansion was designed by the noted theater architects Herts & Tallant and is one of their rare residential commissions in New York City. While it features elements of neo-Georgian and Beaux-Arts design, the mansion displays the highly individualistic character which Herts & Tallant brought to residential architecture. While Riverside Park and Riverside Drive had been planned by Frederick Law Olmsted in 1873, construction of the park and roadway continued until 1898. The presence of the park and drive as well as that of the Ninth Avenue elevated railroad--opened in 1879--were an incentive to the development of the West Side which was carried out primarily between 1885 and 1900. While the first stages of West Side development were concentrated on the side streets, development also began about 1885 on the choice and higher-priced lots facing Riverside Drive itself. By 1900 there were approximately 135 single-family residences located along Riverside Drive. While most were rowhouses, approximately 30 were freestanding residences commissioned by a specific client from an architect. In 1899 Isaac L. Rice purchased the site on the southwest corner of 89th Street and Riverside Drive for his mansion from William W. Hall, a prominent builder and real estate developer active on both the East and West Sides during this period. Earlier that year the site for the Soldiers and Sailors Monument (1900-02, Stoughton & Stoughton and Paul Duboy), a designated New York City Landmark, just across the drive, had finally been chosen, Just north of 89th Street on the drive were two residences commissioned by members of the unrelated Clark families who had done much to aid development on the Upper West Side. Elizabeth Scriven Clark, the widow of Alfred Corning Clark and later wife of Henry Codman Potter, Episcopal bishop of New York, built her house at 89th Street in 1898-99 from designs by Ernest Flagg, while Cyrus Clark, honored with a plaque in Riverside Park as the "the father of the West Side," had built his house at 90th Street in 1887 from designs by Henry F. Kilburn. Both have now been replaced by apartment buildings. Isaac L. Rice (1850-1915), born in Bavaria, Germany, immigrated to the United States as a child with his parents. After studying in the schools of Philadelphia and then in Paris, he began to write and teach, publishing a book entitled What Is Music? in 1875. Turning his attention to the study of law, he graduated from Columbia Law School in 1880. He became counsel to several railroads which were in a period of reorganization and made his fortune with the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad.. As an early promoter of electrical inventions he became president of the Electric Storage Battery Co. in 1897, founded the Electric Vehicle Co. in 1896, and also the Electric Boat Co. In keeping with his early literary interests, Rice established the Forum, a political and literary review, in 1885. Rice was also a noted chess player who invented an opening called the "Rice gambit." In 1885 he married Julia Hyneman Barnett. His tribute to her was to name the new family residence "Villa Julia." Julia Barnett Rice (I860-?) was a notable figure in her own right. Born in New Orleans, she studied medicine at the Women's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, receiving an M.D. degree in 1885. Although she never practiced medicine, her concern for hospital patients suffering from excessive noise on the boats plying the East River led her to found the Society for the Suppression of Unnecessary Noise. Not only was a bill passed to regulate the boat whistles of river traffic, but quiet zones were established around city hospitals. To design their new residence the Rices commissioned the architectural firm of Herts & Tallant which at that time was just beginning to make its reputation in theater architecture. Henry B. Herts (1871-1933) and Hugh Tallant (1870-1952) had met while students at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris from which Tallant had received a medal of honor in 1896. Herts, a talented painter, also exhibited at the Paris Salon. Upon returning to New York the two formed a partnership in 1897. Their first commission was to refurbish and to add an extension to the Harmonie Club, 45 West 42nd Street (now demolished). Isaac Rice had been a member of this exclusive German-Jewish club since 1885, His firsthand knowledge of Herts & Tallant's work for the club was undoubtedly a factor which led him to give them the commission for his residence. The firm had also

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