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    las vegas
  • largest city in Nevada; located in southeastern Nevada; originally settled by Mormons but is now famous for entertainment and gambling and general excess
  • McCarran International Airport is the principal commercial airport serving Las Vegas and Clark County, Nevada, United States. The airport is located five miles (8 km) south of the central business district of Las Vegas, in the unincorporated area of Paradise in Clark County.
  • A city in southern Nevada; pop. 478,434. It is noted for its casinos and nightclubs
  • The Las Vegas Amtrak station is located at Railroad Street & Lincoln Avenue in Las Vegas, New Mexico. The station is near the Hotel Castaneda, a former hotel built by Fred Harvey for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad.
    airline
  • An organization providing a regular public service of air transportation on one or more routes
  • a hose that carries air under pressure
  • A pipe supplying air
  • a commercial enterprise that provides scheduled flights for passengers
  • An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight, generally these companies with a recognized operating certificate or license. Airlines lease or own their aircraft with which to supply these services and may form partnerships or alliances with other airlines for mutual benefit.
  • A route that forms part of a system regularly used by aircraft
    cheap
  • (of an item for sale) Low in price; worth more than its cost
  • brassy: tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
  • relatively low in price or charging low prices; "it would have been cheap at twice the price"; "inexpensive family restaurants"
  • bum: of very poor quality; flimsy
  • (of prices or other charges) Low
  • Charging low prices
cheap airline to las vegas - Travel Tips
Travel Tips !
Travel Tips !
Essential: Travel Tips !

A collection of selected reports -

Tips for Finding the Best Holiday Travel Deals Online

Tips for Packing your Car for the Holidays

Tips for Staying Alert during Holiday Travel

Tips to make Holiday Travel Easier

Traveling for the Holidays on a Greyhound Bus

Ways to Keep Children Entertained while Traveling in the Car fo the Holidays

Ways to make Holiday Travel Easier fo the Elderly

Ways to Save Money for Holiday Travel

Are you Ready to Travel for the Holidays

Avoid Conflicts when you Travel for the Holidays

Children Traveling alone for the Holidays

Dealing with Motion Sickness when you travel for the Holidays

Holiday Cruises

Holiday Travel By Train

Holiday Travel with your Pets

How to Travel with Food for the Holidays

Keep up to Date with the Weather During Holiday Travel

Navigation Systems you can use for Holiday Travel

Packing for Holiday Travel

Planning a Flight around the Holidays

Popular Vacation Spots that are perfect for the Holidays

Preparing you Home for Holiday Travel

Preparing your Vehicle for Holiday Travel

Save Money on Holiday Travel

Save Money with a Timeshare for the Holidays

Essential: Travel Tips !

A collection of selected reports -

Tips for Finding the Best Holiday Travel Deals Online

Tips for Packing your Car for the Holidays

Tips for Staying Alert during Holiday Travel

Tips to make Holiday Travel Easier

Traveling for the Holidays on a Greyhound Bus

Ways to Keep Children Entertained while Traveling in the Car fo the Holidays

Ways to make Holiday Travel Easier fo the Elderly

Ways to Save Money for Holiday Travel

Are you Ready to Travel for the Holidays

Avoid Conflicts when you Travel for the Holidays

Children Traveling alone for the Holidays

Dealing with Motion Sickness when you travel for the Holidays

Holiday Cruises

Holiday Travel By Train

Holiday Travel with your Pets

How to Travel with Food for the Holidays

Keep up to Date with the Weather During Holiday Travel

Navigation Systems you can use for Holiday Travel

Packing for Holiday Travel

Planning a Flight around the Holidays

Popular Vacation Spots that are perfect for the Holidays

Preparing you Home for Holiday Travel

Preparing your Vehicle for Holiday Travel

Save Money on Holiday Travel

Save Money with a Timeshare for the Holidays

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DC-3 at Thun Field
DC-3 at Thun Field
DC-3 nearly ready to fly again MIKE ARCHBOLD; The News Tribune With its gleaming aluminum skin and black and white stripes, the Douglas DC-3 sitting next to the runaway at Thun Field in Pierce County wears its history well, thanks to Dan Merritt and Eric Thun. Its classic tail-dragger lines – cockpit and wings higher in the air than the tail that rests on a single tire – evoke another era. Two 1,200-horsepower engines power the three-bladed props that almost seem to touch the fuselage. Cloth covers the flaps and the rudder. Three years ago, Merritt and Thun first saw the plane on a cold snowy day at an airport in Bennington, Vt. Its tires were flat; the interior was just the framing under the aluminum skin. The once elegant passenger seats had been dumped in a pile. But its two 14-cylinder Pratt & Whitney engines were in fine shape. Corrosion on the plane was minimal. They went to work on it. “It was blowing snow, blizzardy,” recalled Thun, 54. “Everyone at the airport thought we were nuts.” The man who owned it had bought it with the idea of turning the interior into three bedrooms and a kitchen and then flying his family around the world. His dream died unfulfilled. A NEW JOURNEY Merritt and Thun knew what they had: a plane that many consider the greatest airplane design of its time or, some would argue, of all time. After three cross-country trips to Vermont and six full days of working in the cold, the DC-3 was ready to fly. They loaded up a 55-gallon drum of oil to feed the engines if needed, filled the tanks with 800 gallons of fuel and headed west. Sixteen flight hours later, with stops in Ohio and Nebraska, Merritt landed the DC-3 at Thun Field. They then flew the plane to Thun’s farm near Elma, which has an airstrip, for the restoration. It would take Merritt and Thun three years until they could fly it back to Thun Field, which they did two weeks ago. “It’s one of the coolest airplanes ever built,” said Merritt, 43. “It’s definitely the funnest to fly.” Merritt flies Boeing 757 jets for Northwest Airlines but he’s always hankered to own a DC-3, the plane that transformed commercial air travel in the 1930s and 1940s. The Douglas Aircraft Co. built 10,655 of them. Many are still flying but only about two dozen owned by private individuals are still operational, Merritt said. Most of all he liked flying them: smooth like a jet with a low not-unpleasant drone from its engines, he said. He flew them in the early 1990s when he worked for an air cargo company. Back then, he helped a group reclaim a DC-3 for a family looking for a family airliner. Besides being a pilot he also is a airplane mechanic. Merritt admitted he thought he would never own one. Finding one cheap enough to buy and still capable of restoring was not going to be easy, he said. “The plane found us,” Merritt said. A friend of a friend told them about it. Merritt was skeptical. Even after seeing it for the first time he wasn’t sure. “I kind of decided not to buy it,” he said. “It looked like a lot of work. “Eric talked me into it.” PREVIOUS LIVES The big twin-engine plane was destined for the life of a commercial airliner with TWA when World War II interfered. Instead it became a troop-carrier plane, designated as the C-53 Skytrooper by the military. It dropped paratroopers over Sicily and then thundered over Normandy on D-Day. It dropped troops over the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden. It belonged to the 62nd Troop Carrier Squadron. The squadron motto was “Primas in Toto,” Latin for “First in Everything. Thun recreated the patch of the squadron officer’s club and placed it on the DC-3 tail. It includes the motto. The tail also has the troop carrier insignia still used today by the Air Force. Bullets once raked its thin skin. Thun, who restored the interior of the plane and researched its history, said he found the names of about 20 GIs written in pencil on the skin between the frames. He copied them down and took photographs of them before covering them with insulation and an interior skin. Thun even tracked down the original pilot, 1st Lt. Richard D. Stevens, and called him at his home in Texas. “He thought it was pretty neat,” Thun said. “He said it was such a good machine.” Both Merritt and Thun entertain the idea of flying to the 62nd Squadron’s reunion some day if there are still enough men around from the old days. After the war, Thun said, the plane went into service with TWA until the 1950s. It was then owned by a couple of corporations. A skydiving company used it for 10-15 years. Finally, a series of private owners took over. Merritt said the previous owners had put a lot of money into the plane. Its avionics or cockpit instrumentation is first rate, he said. They estimated value of the restored plane at about $200,000. He still had to replace a large section of the plane’s outer skin to aft of the doorway. Years of skydiver use had left it banged up. A GIFT The interior of th
Secretary Clinton Remarks at a Ceremony Celebrating the Negotiation of Agreements Between the United States and 100 Open Skies Partners - IMG 5559
Secretary Clinton Remarks at a Ceremony Celebrating the Negotiation of Agreements Between the United States and 100 Open Skies Partners -  IMG 5559
Washington, DC - March 30, 2011 Thank you very much. And it’s a real pleasure for me to welcome you to the Benjamin Franklin Room here on the eighth floor of the State Department as we celebrate the negotiation of agreements between the United States and 100 Open Skies partners. I’d like to extend my appreciation to all the negotiators, government officials, members of the airline and airport industries, the labor community, and other stakeholders in this 100-strong partnership who came to mark this special occasion with us. I'm also delighted that Secretary Ray LaHood, who is one of the leaders in many of our Open Skies agreements, our State Department team with Under Secretary Bob Hormats, Assistant Secretary Jose Fernandez, and of course, all the excellent negotiators led by Kris Urs. I want to especially acknowledge both Congresswoman Granger and former Secretary Maneta and a number of ambassadors who are here from our Open Skies partners. I want to extend a special greeting to Colombian Ambassador Gabriel Silva, whose country became our 100th partner last November. So thank you so much. Now, I don’t need to tell this audience that we know what the benefits are of these Open Skies agreements. They not only allow us to cross great distances, which I have been doing a lot of recently, but also to open up markets, create jobs, allow people in far -removed countries to interact, share information, and build businesses together. For too long, however, restrictive agreements between governments cut off all of these potential connections. They kept airlines from entering certain markets. They forced shipping companies to fly inefficient routes with half-empty airplanes. And, by stifling competition, they kept air fares artificially high. That's why the Department of State and Department of Transportation negotiated the first Open Skies Agreement, with the Netherlands, in 1992. Now, today, we have agreements with countries in every region of the world, from major economies, such as Japan, Canada and the European Union, to smaller but equally important countries such as El Salvador and Senegal. And on the President’s recent trip to Latin America, we concluded our new agreement with Brazil, our 101st partner. And we look forward to expanding these partnerships around the world. In each case, an Open Skies agreement has powerful benefits – fewer government restrictions, more competition, more jobs in the air and on the ground; more people trading, exchanging and interacting; cheaper flights, more tourists, new routes to new cities – so that we now have passengers and shippers enjoying direct services between cities like Las Vegas and Seoul, or Phoenix and Montreal. Just consider for a minute what this agreement with one country, Colombia, will mean. Now, one of Colombia’s biggest exports – fresh-cut flowers – will make it to the flower stands of the United States even faster because shippers will now have more direct access to more American cities. And on the U.S. side, our computers, sensitive electronics, and spare parts for all types of equipment will make it to Colombia more quickly and efficiently. And with more direct services between more points, we’ll see more recreational and business travel between our two countries. Now, Open Skies agreements have another big plus: They deepen relationships between people in very personal ways. I’m a big believer in people-to-people diplomacy, and this is actually a means toward achieving that. It’s what I call citizen diplomacy, and it’s one of the ways we can meet the challenges of the 21st century. Building a continuous airborne corridor of prosperity around the world is one of our goals. Now, I unfortunately will have to leave, so I’m going to miss Ray’s remarks because, as Ray and Kay well know, I just came from a classified briefing on Libya to the House and I have to be at the Senate for a classified briefing to the Senate at 4:30. And as a former member, I know I’d better not be late. So I’m going to now turn the podium over to Department of Transportation Assistant Secretary Susan Kurland, who will follow me and will introduce Ray. But let me once again thank you all for what you’ve done to make this moment possible, and thank you for coming to celebrate with us. (PRN: 2011/503)

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