CHARTER FLIGHTS TO GRENADA. CHARTER FLIGHTS

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Charter Flights To Grenada


charter flights to grenada
    charter flights
  • A flight by an aircraft chartered for a specific trip, not part of an airline's regular schedule
  • A charter airline, also sometimes referred to as an air taxi, operates aircraft on a charter basis, that is flights that take place outside normal schedules, by a hiring arrangement with a particular customer.
  • (Charter flight) flights organized directly from the departure location to the destination without any intermediate  stops, usually these flights don't operate on a previously fixed schedule and have less room inside for passengers
    grenada
  • A country in the southern Windward Islands, in the Caribbean Sea, that consists of the island of Grenada and the southern Grenadine Islands; pop. 84,800; capital, St. George's; languages, English (official) and English Creole
  • Grenada is an island country and sovereign state consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands at the southern end of the Grenadines in the southeastern Caribbean Sea.
  • Grenada is a city in Grenada County, Mississippi, United States. The population was 14,879 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Grenada County.
  • an island state in the West Indies in the southeastern Caribbean Sea; an independent state within the British Commonwealth
charter flights to grenada - Grenada, Carriacou
Grenada, Carriacou & Petite Martinique (Bradt Travel Guide)
Grenada, Carriacou & Petite Martinique (Bradt Travel Guide)
Since its decimation by Hurricane Ivan in 2004, the three-island state of Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique has been rebuilt, renovated and improved. These islands are once more open for business, and enjoying a newfound prosperity as visitor numbers increase year on year. Grenada has national parks that teem with wildlife and trekking opportunities through forests of nutmeg, avocado and mango trees. Neighboring Carriacou is one of the Caribbean’s top diving destinations and Petit Martinique is a laid-back paradise with unspoilt, secluded beaches.


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Gary Rhodes DSC 0421
Gary Rhodes DSC 0421
GARY RHODES - AROUND THE HIGH SEAS From his latest venture in Dublin to the art of cooking on board the 'Arcadia' cruise ship, Gary Rhodes tells Kate Simon how he is making waves overseas Sunday, 27 August 2006 I became involved with the Arcadia cruise liner two years ago. I went to Venice while the ship was being built to look at the structure - the size was quite daunting, absolutely huge, and that was just the frame. I thought, "This is going to take a lifetime to build." So it's incredible how it all came together so quickly. I was very excited at the prospect of being involved with the liner and introducing a Rhodes restaurant on board. It was my dream as a student to be head chef of restaurants across the world, and I think this is the closest I'll ever get to that - one minute in the Caribbean, the next in the Mediterranean. After several meetings with the owner, P&O, I realised that the company believed 100 per cent in Arcadian Rhodes, down to my involvement in choosing every single plate and piece of cutlery and glassware. It wasn't just a question of "Here it all is, Gary, move in and get on with it". The architecture of the restaurant was in place, but I was very involved in deciding the fine details, like what sort of linen we were going to have - would it be white or off-white, should we have napkins with the Arcadian Rhodes logo or not. And that was a good 12 months before the ship was even launched. It was very important to me to be part of that process. It's the same with anything that I get involved in - either I'm part of that project or I'm not part of it; it's not just a question of sticking my name on something. So although I don't own Arcadian Rhodes, I do feel that it is my own. I've been working on the menus over the past year. I'm trying to establish certain dishes that I feel belong to Arcadian Rhodes and won't feature elsewhere. The moment I bring a menu together, the chef who's looking after the restaurant for me will come over to the UK for maybe a week or two, whatever I feel is needed, and together we'll just cook that menu. They will learn it, taste it and try to understand what the dishes are about so that they know exactly what they have to produce for me. And I hope that at the same time they'll point out problems, tell me things like: "Look, Gary, it will be almost impossible to get hold of that produce on board. We'll be out in the Caribbean." It has been a learning process for me too. There are certain dishes now that people really like. A lot of our guests return - they get hooked on Arcadian Rhodes - and they always hope that a certain dish is still on the menu. But it's going to take quite a long process to establish what I'd like to think of as the Arcadian Rhodes classics. I want to make sure they only belong on this ship and in this particular restaurant. Sometimes I like to leave them where they were born. Eating on board is different to other experiences. At Rhodes 24, in the City of London, you've got your business gentleman, perhaps entertaining his clients. But on Arcadia, there's such a wide audience - people from all walks of life, it is so mixed. I never do a walkabout in the restaurants, but I do it here on the cruise ship because it's a different feel. People are on holiday. T hey're here to enjoy - you want to try to give them more. So I can spend three hours meeting the diners, because the most important thing is to have made them feel like they've really got to know the restaurant, the chef, myself. Cooking on the move is very similar to cooking at a hotel. I've done cookery demonstrations on the QE2. Bit of a shaky old trip, though, across the Atlantic. And I've done the occasional function on board the Orient Express. There, you cook in a little box, one of several throughout the train. I take on three or four of my lads to be responsible for each box. I'm in one of them, they're in the others and it's off we go, full steam ahead. Andrew is responsible for Arcadian Rhodes. He's a very talented chef - a great manager of the kitchen as well as a good cook, which is a wonderful plus. He's cooked with me several times in London now. The experience on board is much the same as in a restaurant because it's the same process, the way the orders come in and then out goes the bread and the little amuse - you could be anywhere. The only thing is that now and again you might get that little wobble from the ocean. That you don't get in London. My other business interests outside the UK include my restaurant at the Calabash in Grenada. I first started visiting the island 10 years ago. I was quite surprised at the amount of Brits holidaying there: Grenada isn't unknown, but it feels untouched. It's certainly not a commercial island, and that's what I love about it. I went there to do a Christmas TV special for the BBC. Two years later I returned for a holiday
Troubled Times
Troubled Times
Troubled Times On January 4th 1963, Canberra was steaming east at 27 knots across the Mediterranean with 2,222 passengers on board. At around 04:00 when she was about 160 miles north-east of Malta, one of the officers in the engine room noticed that one of the three turbo-generators had shed its load. As the generator began to motor, the crew were unable to trip the circuit breaker, and one of the engine room hands forcibly broke the contact - despite a sign warning against this - creating an electrical arc which caused a fire that continued to be fed electrically by the other two generators and that totally destroyed the starboard side of the switchboard and many electrical distribution cables. The ship suddenly lost all power and alarms rang out around the ship. With no electrical power, the engines could not work, there was no lighting, no ventilation or power for the galley. Parts of the lower decks also began to fill with smoke and passengers were ordered to their muster stations. Fortunately, lifeboats weren't required as the blaze was under control within an hour. The P&O liner Stratheden had left Port Said a few days before and was diverted to assist Canberra. Two Royal Navy ships - Lion and Scorpion - were exercising in the area and headed towards the stricken ship and an RAF Shackleton AEW aircraft based in Malta was sent to overfly the area. At dawn, the Stratheden supplied Canberra with fresh bread and other stores, and by the afternoon the ship's engineers and electricians had managed to restore power to the main engines and the ship got underway for Grand Harbour where repairs would be carried out. Her four-knot speed was later increased to ten knots, and was able to make Malta by 09:00 the next morning - Saturday January 5th. In London, emergency plans swung into operation. The "Malta Airlift" as it would come to be known, was masterminded by a man named Freddie Laker. Within a week, 14 large aircraft had been chartered and P&O had managed to fly 1,700 passengers to their destinations - mostly Australia and New Zealand. Some passengers refused to fly, and they either continued on other ships or with Canberra back to England. Had anyone had the time to really think about it - the simple fact that almost 2,000 people could be transported thousands of miles within a few days rather than weeks - the future was not bright for the ocean liner. Early in the afternoon of January 14th 1963, Canberra slowly left her berth in Bighi Bay with around 46 passengers on board who had refused to leave the ship regardless. Headed for Belfast and more repairs, she steamed through 60-knot winds to arrive back in her birthplace on January 21st. The ship was to be out of service for four months whilst Harland & Wolff fit a new switchboard, and the ship was given a general overhaul. Shortly after noon on May 11th Canberra left Belfast again to undertake sea trials in the Irish Sea. On the 14th, she anchored off the Isle of Wight, and entered No.7 dry dock in Southampton the next morning for a routine inspection of her underwater hull. On Friday May 24th, Canberra sailed from Southampton once again - with a record 2,266 passengers on board. In 1965, Canberra found herself stranded again, though this time through no fault of her own. For 45 days in the summer, British seaman striked over pay and conditions - demanding a shorter working week and a 17% pay increase. The shipping companies refused to give ground, having given a 13% increase the previous year, and so the docks became full with laid up vessels. P&O had to cancel three of Canberra's cruises, but luckily for them the problems were resolved just before her world voyage and things returned to normal. By the end of the decade, the numbers of emigrants travelling to Australia was begin to slow down as the Australian government was more choosy about who it let in. This, coupled with the flight of the first Boeing 747 across the Atlantic with over 350 passengers on board, signalled the writing on the wall the ocean liner. With soaring fuel costs and falling demand, P&O decided to try something new with Canberra, and so sent her across the pond to New York where she would be marketed (by Cunard of all companies!) for cruises, mainly to the Caribbean. To say the new venture was not a great success would be an understatement. Bookings for Canberra's voyages were extremely low, and after just two cruises P&O to the dramatic step of laying her up at the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The nearest town, Wilmington, was over 25 miles from her anchorage, and it took a good 30 minutes to get ashore in Canberra's tenders. A local fishing boat provided a vital link for the crew, delivering newspapers and mail, as many of the crew did not bother going ashore that much because of the distance. Things did not look good for Canberra. After being laid up for almost three weeks, she return

charter flights to grenada
charter flights to grenada
Grenada Sights 2011: a travel guide to the main attractions in Grenada, Carriacou, and Petit Martinique, Caribbean (Mobi Sights)
This illustrated Travel Guide is a part of the Mobi Sights series, our concise guides that only feature the most essential information on city attractions. This guide is designed for optimal navigation on eReaders, smartphones, and other mobile electronic devices. Inside you will find a locator map and a list of top attractions linked to individual articles.

NEW FEATURE: Many of the attraction articles now include links to Google Maps. On a dedicated electronic reader with a slow connection and a primitive browser, Google Maps will display the attraction on the map along with metro stations, roads, and nearby attractions. On an internet-enabled device such as the iPhone and the iPad, Google Maps will even show you the route from your current location to the attraction you want to go to.

With this travel guide you can turn some eReaders into an audio guides. For example, on the Kindle, just open an article and click Shift+SYM to activate text-to-speech. Put the speaker on the back of the Kindle against your ear and enjoy your virtual travel companion. Press Spacebar to pause/resume text-to-speech.

All travel guides in the Mobi Sights series are only $0.99. Search for any title: enter mobi (short for MobileReference) and a keyword; for example: mobi Paris.

This illustrated Travel Guide is a part of the Mobi Sights series, our concise guides that only feature the most essential information on city attractions. This guide is designed for optimal navigation on eReaders, smartphones, and other mobile electronic devices. Inside you will find a locator map and a list of top attractions linked to individual articles.

NEW FEATURE: Many of the attraction articles now include links to Google Maps. On a dedicated electronic reader with a slow connection and a primitive browser, Google Maps will display the attraction on the map along with metro stations, roads, and nearby attractions. On an internet-enabled device such as the iPhone and the iPad, Google Maps will even show you the route from your current location to the attraction you want to go to.

With this travel guide you can turn some eReaders into an audio guides. For example, on the Kindle, just open an article and click Shift+SYM to activate text-to-speech. Put the speaker on the back of the Kindle against your ear and enjoy your virtual travel companion. Press Spacebar to pause/resume text-to-speech.

All travel guides in the Mobi Sights series are only $0.99. Search for any title: enter mobi (short for MobileReference) and a keyword; for example: mobi Paris.

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