PINEAPPLE TREE DECORATION : PINEAPPLE TREE

Pineapple tree decoration : Asian decorated rooms

Pineapple Tree Decoration


pineapple tree decoration
    pineapple tree
  • Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is the common name for a tropical plant and its edible fruit which are coalesced berries. Pineapples are the only bromeliad fruit in widespread cultivation. It can be grown as an ornamental, especially from the leafy tops.
    decoration
  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something
  • something used to beautify
  • Ornamentation
  • an award for winning a championship or commemorating some other event
  • the act of decorating something (in the hope of making it more attractive)
  • A thing that serves as an ornament
pineapple tree decoration - Framed Black
Framed Black poster printed on 20 x 30 stock. Walnut Tree
Framed Black poster printed on 20 x 30 stock. Walnut Tree
This image is framed in a standard black wooden frame. The image is protected by a clear strong plexi glass which also adds a lustrous shine. This framed image will come with all the required hardware for hanging. This image is one a collection of vintage art, restored, and digitally reprinted on superior-quality poster paper as 20x30 inches. We print on heavy stock paper using water based inks in reproduction to achieve the most vibrant combination of colors. Images are kept as true to the originals as possible. What is paper stock? Paper stock is a term often used for posters, catalog covers and other items which require rigidity. LOWEST ONLINE PRICE GUARANTEED.

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Pineapples
Pineapples
Vivero La Paz, Bucerias. Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is the common name for a tropical plant and its edible fruit which are coalesced berries. Pineapples are the only bromeliad fruit in widespread cultivation. It can be grown as an ornamental, especially from the leafy tops. Some sources say that the plant will flower after about 24 months & produce a fruit during the following six months while others indicate a 20-month timetable. Pineapple is eaten fresh or canned or juiced. It is popularly used in desserts, salads, as a complement to meat dishes and in fruit cocktail. The popularity of the pineapple is due to its sweet-sour taste containing 15% sugar and malic and citric fruit acids. It is also high in vitamin B1, B2, B6 and C. Its protein-digesting enzyme bromelain seems to help digestion at the end of a high protein meal. In the Philippines, pineapple leaves are used as the source of a textile fiber called pina. The word pineapple in English was first recorded in 1398, when it was originally used to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones). The term pine cone for the reproductive organ of conifer trees was first recorded in 1694. When European explorers discovered this tropical fruit, they called them pineapples (term first recorded in that sense in 1664 because of their resemblance to what is now known as the pine cone). In the scientific binomial Ananas comosus, ananas, the original name of the fruit, comes from the Tupi (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) word nanas, meaning "excellent fruit", as recorded by Andre Thevet in 1555, and comosus, "tufted", refers to the stem of the fruit. Other members of the Ananas genus are often called pine as well by laymen. Many languages use the Tupian term ananas. In Spanish, pineapples are called pina "pine cone" in Spain and most Hispanic American countries, or anana (ananas in Argentina) (see the pina colada drink). They have varying names in the languages of India: "Anaasa" (????) in Telugu, "Sapuri-PaNasa" in Odia language,annachi pazham (Tamil), anarosh (Bengali), and in Malayalam, kaitha chakka. In Malay, pineapples are known as "nanas" or "nenas". In the Maldivian language of Dhivehi, pineapples are known as alanaasi. A large, sweet pineapple grown especially in Brazil is called abacaxi. The pineapple is a herbaceous short-lived perennial plant which grows to 1.0 to 1.5 metres (3.3 to 4.9 ft) tall. After the first fruit is produced, side shoots (called 'suckers' by commercial growers) are produced in the leaf axils of the main stem. These may be removed for propagation, or left to produce additional fruits on the original plant. Commercially, suckers that appear around the base are cultivated. It has 30 or more long, narrow, fleshy, trough-shaped leaves with sharp spines along the margins that are 30 to 100 centimetres (1.0 to 3.3 ft) long, surrounding a thick stem. In the first year of growth the axis lengthens and thickens, bearing numerous leaves in close spirals. After 12 to 20 months the stem grows into a spike-like inflorescence up to 15 cm long with over 100 spirally arranged, trimerous flowers, each subtended by a bract. Flower colours vary, depending on variety, from lavender, through light purple to red. The ovaries develop into berries which coalesce into a large, compact, multiple accessory fruit. The fruit of a pineapple is arranged in two interlocking helices, eight in one direction, thirteen in the other, each being a Fibonacci number. Pineapple carries out CAM photosynthesis, fixing carbon dioxide at night and storing it as the acid malate and then releasing it during the day, aiding photosynthesis. Pollination is required for seed formation, but the presence of seeds negatively affects the quality of the fruit. In Hawaii, where pineapple is cultivated on an agricultural scale, importation of hummingbirds is prohibited for this reason. Certain bat-pollinated wild pineapples only open their flowers at night. Raw pineapple is an excellent source of manganese (45% DV in a 100 g serving) and vitamin C (80% DV per 100 g). Pineapple contains a proteolytic enzyme, bromelain, which breaks down protein. Pineapple juice can thus be used as a marinade and tenderizer for meat. The enzymes in raw pineapples can interfere with the preparation of some foods, such as jelly or other gelatin-based desserts, but it is destroyed during cooking and the canning process. The quantity of bromelain in the fruit is probably not medically significant, being mostly in the inedible stalk. There are myths that pineapple has benefits for intestinal disorders or serves as a pain reliever. Both the root and fruit are sometimes eaten or applied topically as an anti-inflammatory and as a proteolytic agent. It is traditionally used as an antihelminthic agent in the Philippines. In some cultures, the pineapple has become associated with the notion of welcome, an associ
pearl christmas days.
pearl christmas days.
As i am listening to Elisa, this reminded me of her song and album "pearl days". My grandmom got me this on the day after Christmas. Little, simple, but so cute and gorgeous to photograph (little silver pearls are perfect for bokeh experimentations!). You won't stop me from taking Christmas pictures!! I'mma use every day i've to shot this beautiful period of the year. I can't believe people keep taking their trees down right after Christmas. Mine stays up until after Ephiphany (Jan 7th) and it breaks my heart to bring it down. This year i specially love my tree, it came out very pretty thanks to all of my mom's gorgeous decorations- she always had an incredibly beautiful taste for materials (and never cared about money either, this is a kick ass combo bhaha). Next year i want it a lot taller, a lot brighter with many more decorations of all colours and Nicholas will help me to make it... or destroy it mmm, we'll see. His first Christmas went very good he was a very good baby and ate like a little pig anything we ate. He had tortellini, todelli, roast, fresh pineapple, pandoro cake. Happy Christmas Holidays!!

pineapple tree decoration
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