DECORATIVE WINDOW PANEL : WINDOW PANEL

Decorative window panel : Dinosaur decoration : Cheap tiki decorations.

Decorative Window Panel


decorative window panel
    window panel
  • (Window Panels) Matching pair of fabric panels that hang from a curtain rod for privacy and/or decorative effect. Also known as drapes
  • Decorative raised panel placed directly below a window. Other applications include placement in a series creating a wainscoting system, or around the front of a whirlpool tub to act as water resistant, decorating access panels.
    decorative
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
  • Relating to decoration
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
decorative window panel - Eclipse Suede
Eclipse Suede 42-Inch by 63-Inch Thermaback Blackout Panel, Black
Eclipse Suede 42-Inch by 63-Inch Thermaback Blackout Panel, Black
Experience the darkness, silence, and beauty of Eclipse curtains. Eclipse ultra-fashionable blackout panels have been laboratory-tested to block out over 99% of outside light and reduce unwanted noise for a better night's sleep. The innovative design of these curtains also makes them energy-efficient by helping to conserve heat and keeping unwanted cold air out, without comprising your style. Whether you are looking to enhance your existing decor or going for a complete room makeover, Eclipse curtains give you the versatility and style you need to decorate any room in your home. Hang them in your living room for better TV viewing or in the nursery or kid's room to keep out unwanted noise and light. Use two window panels on a standard or decorative rod for optimal coverage. Rods sold separately. 100% Polyester. Machine wash, tumble dry, do not bleach. Imported.

80% (19)
Decorative Panels, Mapledurham
Decorative Panels, Mapledurham
St Margaret's at Mapledurham is easily recognised for it's distinctive pyramid-capped west tower, decorated with a chequerboard finish of flint and brick, which is mostly a remodelling by Butterfield during his restoration in 1863 (it also featured memorably in the film 'The Eagle has Landed'). The church is of modest size and consists of nave, chancel and south aisle, the latter being railed off from the rest of the church since the Reformation and has uniquely remained in Catholic hands ever since, the property of the recusant Blount family of neighbouring Mapledurham House. The aisle is generally off limits to the public who can only glimpse it from the nave of the church. However we had been granted rare access to the aisle and thus able to more fully appreciate the monuments and stained glass fragments contained therein. The earliest monument is the memorial brass to Sir Robert Bardolf (d.1395) whilst the most impressive is the tomb with effigies of Sir Richard & Lady Cecily Blount (d.1628 & 1619) in full contemporary costume (the latter's hairdo being notable). Three windows in the aisle contain assembled fragments of stained glass of unknown origins. The east window has pieces of 15th century canopywork, probably original to the church, whilst the remainder contain mostly enamelled pieces of early 17th century date, except for one fine half figure of an angel holding a crown, probably by the Flemish craftsmen established in Southwark c1520s. Alas my record of this church remains incomplete following an accident with my camera, which left me unable to photograph the rest of the church!
Window and Door Details of a Spanish Mission Style Villa - Essendon
Window and Door Details of a Spanish Mission Style Villa - Essendon
The facade of this villa in the inner northern Melbourne suburb of Essendon is Spanish Mission in style and would have been built in the 1930s. The stucco wall finish and the arched portico with columns pay homage to the Spanish Mission style, as do the raised circular reliefs just above each arch. The three arches over the porch canopy give the villa more of a hacienda look, which was very much the aim of the Spanish Mission style. This villa also features wonderfully stylised Jazz Age windows of swirls and cloud like patterns etched in black. Similar patterns may be found in the fly screen door (essential in Australian summers) on the grille, suggesting that this feature is original. The house also has its original low red and brown brick wall, which match the bricks inserted into the decorative panels beneath the windows. The Spanish Mission style was typically a style that emerged in California during the interwar years and spread across the world. Essendon was etablished in the 1860s and became an area of affluence and therefore only had middle-class, upper middle-class and some very wealthy citizens. A more modest bungalow like this suggests that it was built for an aspiring middle-class family, as modernity would have been something very important to the family, representing their ability to be able to afford a house in the style of architecture much in vogue in the 1930s.

decorative window panel
Comments