BROOKLYN NEW YORK FURNITURE. BROOKLYN NEW

Brooklyn new york furniture. Boardroom furniture. Good quality furniture manufacturers

Brooklyn New York Furniture


brooklyn new york furniture
    furniture
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
    new york
  • A state in the northeastern US, on the Canadian border and Lake Ontario in the northwest, as well as on the Atlantic coast in the southeast; pop. 18,976,457; capital, Albany; statehood, July 26, 1788 (11). Originally settled by the Dutch, it was surrendered to the British in 1664. New York was one of the original thirteen states
  • the largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center
  • one of the British colonies that formed the United States
  • A major city and port in southeastern New York, situated on the Atlantic coast at the mouth of the Hudson River; pop. 7,322,564. It is situated mainly on islands, linked by bridges, and consists of five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. Manhattan is the economic and cultural heart of the city, containing the stock exchange on Wall Street and the headquarters of the United Nations
  • a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies
    brooklyn
  • Brooklyn is New York City's most populous borough with approximately 2.5 million residents, and second largest in area. It is also the westernmost county on Long Island.
  • A borough of New York City, at the southwestern corner of Long Island
  • a borough of New York City
  • The Manhattan Clan are the fictional protagonists of the animated Disney series Gargoyles. They are six gargoyles (mythical winged humanoid creatures that turn to stone by day), the last survivors of a Scottish Gargoyle clan who are frozen in stone in the year 994 A.
brooklyn new york furniture - Professionally Framed
Professionally Framed New York City Brooklyn Bridge Night Skyline Art Poster - 24x36 with RichAndFramous Black Wood Frame
Professionally Framed New York City Brooklyn Bridge Night Skyline Art Poster - 24x36 with RichAndFramous Black Wood Frame
The Brooklyn Bridge connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Since its opening, it has become an iconic part of the New York Skyline. New York City is one of the world's major global cities. Its business organizations play a major role in the economy of the nation and of the world. The city is also one of the world's most important cultural centers and is the home of the United Nations. Major tourist destinations include the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Broadway productions, the Brooklyn Bridge, and scores of museums and restaurants.

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Public National Bank of New York Building
Public National Bank of New York Building
Public National Bank of New York Building (later Public National Bank & Trust Company of New York Building), Alphabet City, Manhattan, New York City, United States of America Later Public National Bank & Trust Company of New York Building, Alphabet City, Manhattan The Public National Bank of New York Building in the East Village is a highly unusual American structure displaying the direct influence of the early-twentieth­century modernism of eminent Viennese architect/designer Josef Hoffmann. Built in 1923, the bank was designed by Eugene Schoen (1880-1957), an architect born in New York City of Hungarian Jewish descent, who graduated from Columbia University in 1902, and soon after traveled to Europe, meeting Otto Wagner and Hoffmann in Vienna. Although little remembered today other than as a furniture designer (whose objects are highly sought by collectors), Schoen was for the first half of the twentieth century in the forefront of modern American design, a revered contemporary of many well-known colleagues. He practiced architecture primarily from 1904 until 1925, when he was said to have been inspired to become largely an interior designer after attending the international exposition in Paris, opening his own New York gallery. The New York Times at his death stated that “Schoen was regarded as one of the leading exponents of modern architecture and design and as such helped to develop the movement here.” This was one of the many branch banks that Schoen designed between 1921 and 1930 for the Public National Bank of New York (Public National Bank & Trust Co. of New York after 1927), which had its headquarters on the Lower East Side. Originally two stories, the structure had a monumental ground-story banking floor and upstairs offices. Clad in light grey granitex (having the color and texture of grey granite) terra cotta (recently painted) above a polished grey granite base, it was designed with an angled corner bay with the entrance, flat capital-less fluted pilasters, and a broad, highly stylized molded cornice with a lower band with bosses, the latter features direct references to Hoffmann’s work. The entrance is surmounted by notable polychrome Viennese-inspired terra­cotta ornament in the form of a decorative band above which is a cartouche with a wreath of fruit (which originally held a clock) above an eagle, flanked by curvilinear forms and decorative urns. The building’s terra cotta was manufactured by the New York Architectural Terra Cotta Co. Sold in 1954, the building was converted into a nursing home, with the addition of an intermediate floor, and into apartments in the 1980s. Public National Bank of New York Building 19 The Public Bank, organized in 1908, became the Public National Bank of New York in 1917, with its headquarters on the Lower East Side at Delancey and Ludlow-Orchard Streets. The bank was characterized by continual steady growth, achieved without mergers and developing branches solely within the company. The bank advertised resources of approximately $85 million in 1921, $101.86 million in 1923, and over $135 million in 1927. Its branches multiplied from six in Manhattan, two in the Bronx, and three in Brooklyn in 1923, to nine in Manhattan, eleven in the Bronx, and ten in Brooklyn in 1928. The president of Public National Bank from 1922 to 1929 was Alfred S. Rossin. Of German-Canadian descent, he had worked in his father’s tobacco firm, S[amuel]. Rossin & Sons, and married Clara Lewisohn, daughter of Adolph Lewisohn, the wealthy investment banker and philanthropist. In 1927, the firm became the Public National Bank & Trust Company of New York. In September 1922, the New York Times carried an item that the bank had purchased a “three-story business building at the northeast corner of Avenue C and Seventh Street... [which will] be altered early next Spring and used by the bank as a branch office.”20 Instead, the bank constructed a new building. The virtually unknown Public National Bank of New York Building, built in 1923 to the design of Eugene Schoen, is a highly unusual American structure displaying the direct influence of the early-20th century modernism of the eminent Viennese architect/designer Josef Hoffmann. Schoen filed for the structure in May 1923, to cost an estimated $50,000. Demolition was completed on the site in June, with construction beginning later that month; the bank building was completed in December 1923. The firm of [John J.] Leddy & Moore was general contractor. Approximately 23 by 49 feet, the 2-story structure housed a boiler room and safe deposit in the basement, tellers in the monumental banking floor on the ground story, and offices and utility rooms on the second story, served by an elevator. Fully fireproof, it was constructed with brick walls clad in 4-inch terra cotta, utilizing steel framing. The original exterior design featured light grey granitex (having the color and texture of grey granite, with
Public National Bank of New York Building
Public National Bank of New York Building
Later Public National Bank & Trust Company of New York Building, Alphabet City, Manhattan The Public National Bank of New York Building in the East Village is a highly unusual American structure displaying the direct influence of the early-twentieth­century modernism of eminent Viennese architect/designer Josef Hoffmann. Built in 1923, the bank was designed by Eugene Schoen (1880-1957), an architect born in New York City of Hungarian Jewish descent, who graduated from Columbia University in 1902, and soon after traveled to Europe, meeting Otto Wagner and Hoffmann in Vienna. Although little remembered today other than as a furniture designer (whose objects are highly sought by collectors), Schoen was for the first half of the twentieth century in the forefront of modern American design, a revered contemporary of many well-known colleagues. He practiced architecture primarily from 1904 until 1925, when he was said to have been inspired to become largely an interior designer after attending the international exposition in Paris, opening his own New York gallery. The New York Times at his death stated that “Schoen was regarded as one of the leading exponents of modern architecture and design and as such helped to develop the movement here.” This was one of the many branch banks that Schoen designed between 1921 and 1930 for the Public National Bank of New York (Public National Bank & Trust Co. of New York after 1927), which had its headquarters on the Lower East Side. Originally two stories, the structure had a monumental ground-story banking floor and upstairs offices. Clad in light grey granitex (having the color and texture of grey granite) terra cotta (recently painted) above a polished grey granite base, it was designed with an angled corner bay with the entrance, flat capital-less fluted pilasters, and a broad, highly stylized molded cornice with a lower band with bosses, the latter features direct references to Hoffmann’s work. The entrance is surmounted by notable polychrome Viennese-inspired terra­cotta ornament in the form of a decorative band above which is a cartouche with a wreath of fruit (which originally held a clock) above an eagle, flanked by curvilinear forms and decorative urns. The building’s terra cotta was manufactured by the New York Architectural Terra Cotta Co. Sold in 1954, the building was converted into a nursing home, with the addition of an intermediate floor, and into apartments in the 1980s. Public National Bank of New York Building 19 The Public Bank, organized in 1908, became the Public National Bank of New York in 1917, with its headquarters on the Lower East Side at Delancey and Ludlow-Orchard Streets. The bank was characterized by continual steady growth, achieved without mergers and developing branches solely within the company. The bank advertised resources of approximately $85 million in 1921, $101.86 million in 1923, and over $135 million in 1927. Its branches multiplied from six in Manhattan, two in the Bronx, and three in Brooklyn in 1923, to nine in Manhattan, eleven in the Bronx, and ten in Brooklyn in 1928. The president of Public National Bank from 1922 to 1929 was Alfred S. Rossin. Of German-Canadian descent, he had worked in his father’s tobacco firm, S[amuel]. Rossin & Sons, and married Clara Lewisohn, daughter of Adolph Lewisohn, the wealthy investment banker and philanthropist. In 1927, the firm became the Public National Bank & Trust Company of New York. In September 1922, the New York Times carried an item that the bank had purchased a “three-story business building at the northeast corner of Avenue C and Seventh Street... [which will] be altered early next Spring and used by the bank as a branch office.”20 Instead, the bank constructed a new building. The virtually unknown Public National Bank of New York Building, built in 1923 to the design of Eugene Schoen, is a highly unusual American structure displaying the direct influence of the early-20th century modernism of the eminent Viennese architect/designer Josef Hoffmann. Schoen filed for the structure in May 1923, to cost an estimated $50,000. Demolition was completed on the site in June, with construction beginning later that month; the bank building was completed in December 1923. The firm of [John J.] Leddy & Moore was general contractor. Approximately 23 by 49 feet, the 2-story structure housed a boiler room and safe deposit in the basement, tellers in the monumental banking floor on the ground story, and offices and utility rooms on the second story, served by an elevator. Fully fireproof, it was constructed with brick walls clad in 4-inch terra cotta, utilizing steel framing. The original exterior design featured light grey granitex (having the color and texture of grey granite, with black flecks) terra-cotta cladding above a polished grey granite base; an angled corner bay with the entrance, having a grey granite surround; monumental capital-less fluted pilas

brooklyn new york furniture
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