HOME COMFORT FURNITURE STORE. FURNITURE STORE

Home comfort furniture store. Patio chair furniture. Used office furniture dfw.

Home Comfort Furniture Store


home comfort furniture store
    furniture
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
    comfort
  • A state of physical ease and freedom from pain or constraint
  • Things that contribute to physical ease and well-being
  • Prosperity and the pleasant lifestyle secured by it
  • a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain; "he is a man who enjoys his comfort"; "she longed for the comfortableness of her armchair"
  • a feeling of freedom from worry or disappointment
  • give moral or emotional strength to
    store
  • Store-bought
  • keep or lay aside for future use; "store grain for the winter"; "The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat"
  • a supply of something available for future use; "he brought back a large store of Cuban cigars"
  • A retail establishment selling items to the public
  • A quantity or supply of something kept for use as needed
  • shop: a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services; "he bought it at a shop on Cape Cod"
    home
  • Made, done, or intended for use in the place where one lives
  • provide with, or send to, a home
  • Relating to one's own country and its domestic affairs
  • at or to or in the direction of one's home or family; "He stays home on weekends"; "after the game the children brought friends home for supper"; "I'll be home tomorrow"; "came riding home in style"; "I hope you will come home for Christmas"; "I'll take her home"; "don't forget to write home"
  • home(a): used of your own ground; "a home game"
  • Of or relating to the place where one lives
home comfort furniture store - Comfort Research
Comfort Research Fuf Large Foam Bean Bag Chair, Black Twill
Comfort Research Fuf Large Foam Bean Bag Chair, Black Twill
Large and super comfortable, the Large Fuf Chair will be fought over by everyone in the house, dorm, or anywhere you want to set your Fuf. Filled with chunks of polyurethane foam that never go flat, this chair will mold to your body after repeated usage, but can be re-fuffed again and again for years of comfortable seating. Permanent cover is spot clean. Ships vacuum-packed to save you freight costs, but will -feetgrow-feet back to its original size in a few days. 4-feet in diameter, this is a worth fighting for.

78% (5)
Brooklyn Bridge from Plymouth Street
Brooklyn Bridge from Plymouth Street
DUMBO, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States The DUMBO Historic District, located along the East River waterfront in Brooklyn, is one of New York City's most significant extant industrial waterfront neighborhoods. During much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the area was home to some of the largest and most important manufacturing businesses in Brooklyn or New York City, including Arbuckle Brothers, refiner and packager of sugar and coffee; Robert Gair, manufacturer of paper boxes; the Hanan & Son shoe company; the Kirkman & Son soap company; the John W. Masury & Son paint works; the Jones Brothers/Grand Union grocery business; the E. W. Bliss machine works; and the Brillo steel wool firm. These firms employed thousands of local workers, many of them immigrants who flooded into Brooklyn's working-class neighborhoods in the second half of the nineteenth century and early decades of the twentieth century. By the early twentieth century, Brooklyn was the fourth largest manufacturing center in the entire country and a significant portion of this industrial output occurred in DUMBO. Among the manufacturing businesses that were especially prominent in Brooklyn were those producing machinery, paint, sugar, coffee, packaged groceries, paper boxes and shoes, all of which are represented in the buildings in DUMBO. The approximately 91 buildings in the historic district reflect important trends in the development of industrial architecture in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and embody an important era of Brooklyn and New York City history. The land that now comprises DUMBO was among the earliest in Brooklyn developed for residential use. By the 1830s the character of the neighborhood began to change as residential structures were replaced by commercial buildings and multi-story factories and warehouses. The owners of these structures were attracted to the area because of its proximity to the East River and the presence of ferry lines providing convenient connections to New York City. Among the earliest commercial structures in the district are the c. 1850 66-72 Water Street and c. 1855 64 Water Street, which both take the form of Greek Revival style counting houses. The neighborhood became increasingly industrial in the decades following the Civil War. The earliest of these buildings are representative of the slow-burning mill construction popular in the mid-to-late nineteenth century. These buildings typically have simple brick facades with rhythmically placed window openings and large entrances at the ground level for vehicular access. The internal structural system of these buildings is composed of massive wooden columns, beams, and joints, which is very slow to combust and provides a measure of protection against fire. An example of this type of structure is the factory at 22-38 Washington Street, erected in two phases between 1887 and 1891 for industrialist Robert Gair to the designs of Benjamin Finkensieper, who was responsible for several of the buildings in the district. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century builders began to use steel frame construction and terra-cotta floor tiles to provide even greater protection from fires. While the internal structure of these buildings differed significantly from their predecessors, their outward appearance often closely resembled the older buildings. The complex erected for the Jones Brothers' Grand Union grocery business exemplifies this structural evolution. The company's first building at 59-67 Pearl Street was constructed in 1896-97 and employed a slow-burning wooden internal structure. In subsequent years the company expanded their operations and erected several additions to their building. While the exteriors of these additions closely resembled the original building, the internal structure employed steel frames and terra-cotta tiles and, in the 1915 building, steel frame with reinforced concrete floors. The most radical innovation in DUMBO's industrial architecture occurred at the beginning of the twentieth century, when buildings constructed entirely of reinforced concrete began to appear. These factories, erected by the Gair Company and other firms, were among the earliest large-scale reinforced-concrete factory buildings to be erected in the United States. The first such structure constructed in DUMBO was Robert Gair's factory at 41-49 Washington Street. The building was erected in 1904 by the Turner Construction Company to the designs of architect William Higginson. It was later expanded in 1908 to encompass the entire block. Gair would eventually develop much of the western section of the neighborhood, and many of these buildings were Higginson-designed and Turner-constructed reinforced concrete factories. Gair was such a dominant presence in this area that it eventually came to be known as "Gairville." Both Higginson and Turner became important builders and design
Water Street
Water Street
DUMBO, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States SUMMARY The DUMBO Historic District, located along the East River waterfront in Brooklyn, is one of New York City's most significant extant industrial waterfront neighborhoods. During much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the area was home to some of the largest and most important manufacturing businesses in Brooklyn or New York City, including Arbuckle Brothers, refiner and packager of sugar and coffee; Robert Gair, manufacturer of paper boxes; the Hanan & Son shoe company; the Kirkman & Son soap company; the John W. Masury & Son paint works; the Jones Brothers/Grand Union grocery business; the E. W. Bliss machine works; and the Brillo steel wool firm. These firms employed thousands of local workers, many of them immigrants who flooded into Brooklyn's working-class neighborhoods in the second half of the nineteenth century and early decades of the twentieth century. By the early twentieth century, Brooklyn was the fourth largest manufacturing center in the entire country and a significant portion of this industrial output occurred in DUMBO. Among the manufacturing businesses that were especially prominent in Brooklyn were those producing machinery, paint, sugar, coffee, packaged groceries, paper boxes and shoes, all of which are represented in the buildings in DUMBO. The approximately 91 buildings in the historic district reflect important trends in the development of industrial architecture in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and embody an important era of Brooklyn and New York City history. The land that now comprises DUMBO was among the earliest in Brooklyn developed for residential use. By the 1830s the character of the neighborhood began to change as residential structures were replaced by commercial buildings and multi-story factories and warehouses. The owners of these structures were attracted to the area because of its proximity to the East River and the presence of ferry lines providing convenient connections to New York City. Among the earliest commercial structures in the district are the c. 1850 66-72 Water Street and c. 1855 64 Water Street, which both take the form of Greek Revival style counting houses. The neighborhood became increasingly industrial in the decades following the Civil War. The earliest of these buildings are representative of the slow-burning mill construction popular in the mid-to-late nineteenth century. These buildings typically have simple brick facades with rhythmically placed window openings and large entrances at the ground level for vehicular access. The internal structural system of these buildings is composed of massive wooden columns, beams, and joints, which is very slow to combust and provides a measure of protection against fire. An example of this type of structure is the factory at 22-38 Washington Street, erected in two phases between 1887 and 1891 for industrialist Robert Gair to the designs of Benjamin Finkensieper, who was responsible for several of the buildings in the district. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century builders began to use steel frame construction and terra-cotta floor tiles to provide even greater protection from fires. While the internal structure of these buildings differed significantly from their predecessors, their outward appearance often closely resembled the older buildings. The complex erected for the Jones Brothers' Grand Union grocery business exemplifies this structural evolution. The company's first building at 59-67 Pearl Street was constructed in 1896-97 and employed a slow-burning wooden internal structure. In subsequent years the company expanded their operations and erected several additions to their building. While the exteriors of these additions closely resembled the original building, the internal structure employed steel frames and terra-cotta tiles and, in the 1915 building, steel frame with reinforced concrete floors. The most radical innovation in DUMBO's industrial architecture occurred at the beginning of the twentieth century, when buildings constructed entirely of reinforced concrete began to appear. These factories, erected by the Gair Company and other firms, were among the earliest large-scale reinforced-concrete factory buildings to be erected in the United States. The first such structure constructed in DUMBO was Robert Gair's factory at 41-49 Washington Street. The building was erected in 1904 by the Turner Construction Company to the designs of architect William Higginson. It was later expanded in 1908 to encompass the entire block. Gair would eventually develop much of the western section of the neighborhood, and many of these buildings were Higginson-designed and Turner-constructed reinforced concrete factories. Gair was such a dominant presence in this area that it eventually came to be known as "Gairville." Both Higginson and Turner became important builders a

home comfort furniture store
home comfort furniture store
Prince Lionheart Back to Sleep Wearable Blanket, Medium, Blue
Prince Lionheart Prince Lionheart Back to Sleep Wearable Blanket, Medium, Blue, blue, medium
Back-to-Sleep Sack with Therma-Flow vent, encourages air-flow and helps prevent overheating - a leading cause of SIDS. Satin and velour fabric provides optimum comfort. Eliminates the need for blankets while keeping baby safe and warm. Meets and exceeds all flammability standards for sleepwear.

Features include:

•Thermaflow prevents babies? feet from overheating and keeps them at the right temperature
•Features satin lining to keep baby cool in the summer and warm in the winter
•Comes with cute matching bonus cap
•Suitable for babies 0-6 months

Comments