January 2011

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:: ASESMA NEWSLETTER, JANUARY 2010 ::

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Happy New Year!

This month's newsletter features a fresh motivation to

establish your profile page on our website. Check out

George Manyali's profile:

https://sites.google.com/site/asesma2010/people/participants/george-manyali

More on that below, and instructions for getting your own

profile page.

Also in this issue: An article suggestion from Sandro

Scandolo, and my pick for the web-resource of the month.

I hope that 2011 is a great year for all you:

healthy, happy, and loaded with good science.

- Alison

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:: CONTENTS ::

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1) Announcements

2) Journal article of the month: Sandro's pick

3) Establishing your web presence, part II

4) "Computational Nanoscience: Do It Yourself!"

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:: ANNOUNCEMENTS ::

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The "official" ASESMA website is now up and running:

http://asesma.ictp.it/

It promises that the location of the 2012 school will be

announced soon, so check back for that exciting news!

IBM India is hiring for multiple research positions in the

field of electronic structure calculations. See full

information copied at our website:

https://sites.google.com/site/asesma2010/announcements/researchpositionsadvertisedatibmindia

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:: ARTICLE OF THE MONTH ::

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"Electrical Polarization and Orbital Magnetization: The

Modern Theories" by Raffaele Resta

http://www.psi-k.org/newsletters/News_96/Highlight_96.pdf

This month's article is suggested by Sandro Scandolo and

was the Psi-k Dec 2009 "Highlight" article.

Sandro says:

"We would naively expect that the macroscopic polarization

(and magnetization) of a crystal is determined by the

microscopic dipole moments in the crystal unit cell, and

therefore by the charge density of the polarized crystal,

as discussed in several textbooks. A series of papers

published in the early 90's by D. Vanderbilt, R. Resta,

and collaborators have shown that this widespread belief

is incorrect. The polarization has nothing to do with the

periodic charge distribution of the polarized crystal: the

former is essentially a property of the phase of the

electronic wavefunction, while the latter is a property of

its modulus. The article of Resta reviews the field and

its latest developments. Particularly interesting is the

connection between orbital magnetization and topological

invariants in insulators. After reading Resta's review you

will feel a compelling desire to know more about what

exactly is a topological insulator. Fortunately, an

excellent review on these exotic states has just appeared

in Reviews of Modern Physics, by Hassan and Kane."

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:: ESTABLISHING YOUR WEB PRESENCE ::

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This is part II in our series on establishing your web

presence. Last week we announced our addition of personal

profile pages on the ASESMA website. To help motivate

those of you who haven't done it yet, check out George

Manyali's profile:

https://sites.google.com/site/asesma2010/people/participants/george-manyali

George's profile is the third "hit" I see when I Google

his name from the US, and it's the only page in the top

ten search results that features his academic achievements.

It establishes his association with Moi University, with

ICTP, and with ASESMA and its various prestigious

instructors.

If you are planning to apply for academic positions,

particularly at foreign institutions, you should make sure

that your academic record is easily located on the

internet and that it looks professional. The ASESMA

website is increasingly well-connected and can help make

your achievements visible to the world.

To get your own profile page, follow these instructions:

https://sites.google.com/site/asesma2010/how-to-make-your-personal-page

You can do it all yourself, or provide Alison with your

details and let her do the formatting.

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:: WEB RESOURCE OF THE MONTH ::

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"Computational Nanoscience: Do It Yourself!"

http://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume31/

This free resource hosts a long list of articles on

computational nanoscience. They cover DFT basics as well

as advanced techniques and topics in computing. Enjoy!

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You have received this newsletter because you either

participated in the ASESMA 2010 workshop or expressed an

interest in the ASESMA organization. If you'd like to opt

out of future mailings, please reply to this email with

your request.

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