FLOWERS BY POST TO AUSTRALIA - POST TO AUSTRALIA

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Flowers By Post To Australia


flowers by post to australia
    australia
  • a nation occupying the whole of the Australian continent; Aboriginal tribes are thought to have migrated from southeastern Asia 20,000 years ago; first Europeans were British convicts sent there as a penal colony
  • the smallest continent; between the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean
  • An island country and continent in the southern hemisphere, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations; pop. 19,900,000; capital, Canberra; official language, English
  • (australian) of or relating to or characteristic of Australia or its inhabitants or its languages; "Australian deserts"; "Australian aborigines"
    by post
  • You can post your order to us at the address below and please be sure to include your name, address and contact numbers with your order. If paying by cheque please note that the parts will not be sent until the funds have cleared. Cheques should be made payable to Streamline carbon UK Ltd.
    flowers
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"

Santol Flowers Out Today on the Tree in My Yard.
Santol Flowers Out Today on the Tree in My Yard.
I took these flowers today of my fruit trees that are flowering. They are tropical fruits so the names may not be familiar to some people. The FOURTH is the Santol. In the native state in the jungles of Borneo this tree can grow to 40 metres. The grafted varieties these day reach 8 to 10 metres. Mine is grafted and growing on the footpath as I ran out of room in the yard. Here is some information about the Santol:- Santol looks like overgrown apples but doesn’t share their flavor. “The santol,” wrote P.J. Wester; one of earliest Americans who had done extensive research on tropical fruits, “its one of the most widely distributed fruits in the Philippines. The tree is hardy, of vigorous and rapid growth, and succeeds well even where the dry season is prolonged. The fruit is produced in great abundance, in fact in such profusion that large quantities annually rot on the ground during the ripening season.” Filipino children consider santol as their favorite fruit. In rural areas, wherever you go, you can find santol and mostly it’s your for taking. Inside the fruit there is a white juicy pulp with around three to five seeds. The seeds are up to, two centimeters long. And because the flesh is strongly attached to the seeds, you have to suck it to taste it. The pulp is mostly sub-acid or sour. Filipinos like it in that sour condition and eat the fruit with some salt. The fruit is usually consumed raw without peeling. There are varieties which have sweet flavor and these are used to make delicious marmalade, very popular in markets around Europe and the United States. Santol is known scientifically as Sandoricum koetjape and called wild mangosteen by English speaking countries. It has also several other names: gratawn in Thai, kompem reach in Khmer, tong in Lao, donka in Sinhalese, and faux mangoustanier in French. The fruit is believed native to former Indochina and Peninsular Malaysia. Later, it was introduced into Indian, Borneo, Indonesia, the Moluccas, Mauritius, and finally to the Philippines where it has become naturalized. There are two varieties of santol, the yellow and the red rind. The yellow rind is the most common in the country. Santol grows from sea level of elevation to a height of 3,000 feet above sea level. It grows better in deep and organic grounds, with great distribution of rainfall throughout the year, although it tolerates long periods of dry season. The distance of planting from each other is 20 feet to 25 feet. For maximum yields, it requires fertilization twice a year. Normally, seed trees produce fruit five to seven years after planting. A very productive tree, it can produce between 18,000 and 24,000 fruits per year. The ripe fruits are harvested-by climbing the tree and plucking by hand. Alternatively, a long stick with a forked end may be used to twist the fruits off. The piquant santol can be enjoyed in many ways. In the Philippines, it is dipped in salt and sucked, or scored and sweetened with sugar for a cool glass of santolada. Some Filipino entrepreneurs export santol marmalade in glass jars to Oriental food dealers in the United States and other parts of the world. In India, santol is eaten raw with spices. With the seeds removed, it is made into jam or jelly. Pared and quartered, it is cooked in syrup and preserved in jars. Since the very ripe fruits are naturally vinous, these can be fermented with rice to make an alcoholic drink. As the fruit is sour when not fully ripe, some cooks use it in mouth-watering sinigang. The famous sinigang na bangus sa santol, as served in Pagsanjan, Laguna, is pink and pristine, with no vegetable at all, just santol seeds and pulp, sweetly sour. Like most tropical fruits, santol is also valued for its medicinal properties. The preserved pulp is employed medicinally as an astringent, white crushed leaves are used as poultice on itching skin. Some Filipino mothers placed fresh leaves of santol on the body of a child with fever to cause sweating. The leaf decoction is also used to bathe the patient. The bitter bark, containing the slightly toxic alkaloid and a steroidal sapogenin, is applied on ringworm and is also entered into a potion given to a woman after childbirth. The aromatic, astringent root also serves the latter purpose, and is a potent remedy for diarrhea. An infusion of the fresh or dried root, or the bark, may be taken to relieve colic and stitch in the side. The root is a stomachic and antispasmodic and prized as a tonic. It may be crushed in .a blend of vinegar and water which is then given as a carminative and remedy for diarrhea and dysentery. But there’s more to santol fruits than food and medicine, according to Julia F. Morton, author of Fruits of Warm Climates. The bark, for instance, can be used in tanning fishing lines; some Filipino fishermen employed it as such. Emits an aromatic scent when burned, the wood of the tree is also useful. “If carefully seasoned,” wrote Morton, “it can be employed for hou
Santol Flowers Out Today on the Tree in My Yard.
Santol Flowers Out Today on the Tree in My Yard.
I took these flowers today of my fruit trees that are flowering. They are tropical fruits so the names may not be familiar to some people. The FOURTH is the Santol. In the native state in the jungles of Borneo this tree can grow to 40 metres. The grafted varieties these day reach 8 to 10 metres. Mine is grafted and growing on the footpath as I ran out of room in the yard. Here is some information about the Santol:- Santol looks like overgrown apples but doesn’t share their flavor. “The santol,” wrote P.J. Wester; one of earliest Americans who had done extensive research on tropical fruits, “its one of the most widely distributed fruits in the Philippines. The tree is hardy, of vigorous and rapid growth, and succeeds well even where the dry season is prolonged. The fruit is produced in great abundance, in fact in such profusion that large quantities annually rot on the ground during the ripening season.” Filipino children consider santol as their favorite fruit. In rural areas, wherever you go, you can find santol and mostly it’s your for taking. Inside the fruit there is a white juicy pulp with around three to five seeds. The seeds are up to, two centimeters long. And because the flesh is strongly attached to the seeds, you have to suck it to taste it. The pulp is mostly sub-acid or sour. Filipinos like it in that sour condition and eat the fruit with some salt. The fruit is usually consumed raw without peeling. There are varieties which have sweet flavor and these are used to make delicious marmalade, very popular in markets around Europe and the United States. Santol is known scientifically as Sandoricum koetjape and called wild mangosteen by English speaking countries. It has also several other names: gratawn in Thai, kompem reach in Khmer, tong in Lao, donka in Sinhalese, and faux mangoustanier in French. The fruit is believed native to former Indochina and Peninsular Malaysia. Later, it was introduced into Indian, Borneo, Indonesia, the Moluccas, Mauritius, and finally to the Philippines where it has become naturalized. There are two varieties of santol, the yellow and the red rind. The yellow rind is the most common in the country. Santol grows from sea level of elevation to a height of 3,000 feet above sea level. It grows better in deep and organic grounds, with great distribution of rainfall throughout the year, although it tolerates long periods of dry season. The distance of planting from each other is 20 feet to 25 feet. For maximum yields, it requires fertilization twice a year. Normally, seed trees produce fruit five to seven years after planting. A very productive tree, it can produce between 18,000 and 24,000 fruits per year. [I doubt this is correct. Much too high]The ripe fruits are harvested-by climbing the tree and plucking by hand. Alternatively, a long stick with a forked end may be used to twist the fruits off. The piquant santol can be enjoyed in many ways. In the Philippines, it is dipped in salt and sucked, or scored and sweetened with sugar for a cool glass of santolada. Some Filipino entrepreneurs export santol marmalade in glass jars to Oriental food dealers in the United States and other parts of the world. In India, santol is eaten raw with spices. With the seeds removed, it is made into jam or jelly. Pared and quartered, it is cooked in syrup and preserved in jars. Since the very ripe fruits are naturally vinous, these can be fermented with rice to make an alcoholic drink. As the fruit is sour when not fully ripe, some cooks use it in mouth-watering sinigang. The famous sinigang na bangus sa santol, as served in Pagsanjan, Laguna, is pink and pristine, with no vegetable at all, just santol seeds and pulp, sweetly sour. Like most tropical fruits, santol is also valued for its medicinal properties. The preserved pulp is employed medicinally as an astringent, white crushed leaves are used as poultice on itching skin. Some Filipino mothers placed fresh leaves of santol on the body of a child with fever to cause sweating. The leaf decoction is also used to bathe the patient. The bitter bark, containing the slightly toxic alkaloid and a steroidal sapogenin, is applied on ringworm and is also entered into a potion given to a woman after childbirth. The aromatic, astringent root also serves the latter purpose, and is a potent remedy for diarrhea. An infusion of the fresh or dried root, or the bark, may be taken to relieve colic and stitch in the side. The root is a stomachic and antispasmodic and prized as a tonic. It may be crushed in .a blend of vinegar and water which is then given as a carminative and remedy for diarrhea and dysentery. But there’s more to santol fruits than food and medicine, according to Julia F. Morton, author of Fruits of Warm Climates. The bark, for instance, can be used in tanning fishing lines; some Filipino fishermen employed it as such. Emits an aromatic scent when burned, the wood of the tree is also useful. “If carefully seasoned,”

flowers by post to australia
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