CORPSE FLOWER FOR SALE : FOR SALE

Corpse Flower For Sale : Pictures Of May Flowers

Corpse Flower For Sale


corpse flower for sale
    corpse flower
  • The titan arum or Amorphophallus titanum (from Ancient Greek amorphos, "without form, misshapen" + phallos, "penis", and titan, "giant") is a flowering plant with the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world.
    for sale
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.
  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
corpse flower for sale - Stink and
Stink and the World's Worst Super-Stinky Sneakers (Book #3)
Stink and the World's Worst Super-Stinky Sneakers (Book #3)
"Stink is a delightful protagonist, and McDonald cleverly imparts information on smells. . . . A funny book for almost any collection." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

When Stink Moody’s second-grade class goes on a field trip to the Gross-Me-Out exhibit at the science museum, he learns that his very own nose has amazing sniffing abilities — and that some people have real jobs sniffing stuff for NASA! Soon Stink is engrossed in toilet water, corpse flowers, and all things smelly. But is his fetid footwear foul enough to win a Golden Clothespin Award? Loyal fans will be holding their breath for Stink’s latest outrageous solo adventure.

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Corpse Flower "Odora"
Corpse Flower "Odora"
The trademark aroma of the titan arum - a.k.a. "corpse flower" for its nauseating stench likened to rotting flesh - is filling the air at the University of California Botanical Garden in Berkeley. The giant bloom - actually a stalk of many flowers - began releasing its stinky scent Monday morning in the garden's Tropical House. The blossom typically lasts up to 72 hours before collapsing. Staff at the garden have affectionately named the plant "Odora." They first noticed that the plant was getting ready to bloom on June 18 when the plant was just over 2 feet tall; now, Odora tops out at nearly 4 feet and the staff expects it to get to 5 feet between now and July 5. The tall, conical central stalk of the bloom, called the spadix, generates a tremendous amount of heat that propels oils called putrecines and cadavarines into the air. When the bloom opens, its ribbed, petal-like leaves resemble an upturned fluted bell with a rich maroon interior. The blooms can be as much as 5 feet in diameter and can occur every two years. But it's the plant's putrid odor - strongest at night - that is as striking as its size. The stinky blossom attracts pollinators, insects such as flies and carrion beetles that normally feed on dead animals.
Corpse Flower
Corpse Flower
The "corpse flower" at the Huntington Gardens. It was still growing and on the day I visited the "flower" was 6'2" tall! (The actual flowers are down below at the base, which isn't visible in this image.) As the name suggests, this smells like rotting flesh when open, which attracts flies to pollinate it. Although bloomings of this Sumatran native are rare (about once per decade in the U.S.), the Huntington had several plants in various states of growth and they were selling itty bitty corpse flower plants near the gift store for $250 a pop.

corpse flower for sale
corpse flower for sale
The Corpse Flower: New And Selected Poems (Pacific Northwest Poetry Series)
"The Corpse Flower" brings works from Bruce Beasley's first four award-winning collections together with twenty-five new poems, organizing them around the metaphor that gives the book its title: an enormous tropical bloom that reeks like carrion, and around whose three-day florescence 'dung beetles & flies & sweat bees swarm/pollen gummed all over/their furred feet'. The corpse flower serves as a figure for Beasley's coming to terms with birth and death, fecundity and decay, the illusion of death, and the flourishing of the rare and beautiful out of the materials of the decayed. "The Corpse Flower" traces a spiritual pilgrimage, weaving autobiography into a larger meditation on the materials of language and of the life of the spirit.Beasley's is a deeply physical spirituality - as he writes in one poem, 'the soul's/impossible to tell/from the objects of its appetite'. Throughout these poems, family mythology, as well as religious and mythic narrative and iconography, become occasions for extraordinary meditations on the physicality of birth and death, beginnings and endings. This substantial selection of Bruce Beasley's work, written over a twenty year period, offers the opportunity to experience, page by page, a poet's evolution, and to follow a unique, creative mind as it reaches, through interrogations of faith, science, and art, toward some form of resolution - a resolution increasingly represented by the beauties of language itself.

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