MAIN STREET FLORIST - STREET FLORIST

MAIN STREET FLORIST - FLOWER ARRANGEMENT IN VASE - FLOWER SEEDS PACKETS

Main Street Florist


main street florist
    main street
  • Used in reference to the materialism, mediocrity, or parochialism regarded as typical of small-town life
  • street that serves as a principal thoroughfare for traffic in a town
  • The principal street of a town, traditionally the site of shops, banks, and other businesses
  • any small town (or the people who inhabit it); generally used to represent parochialism and materialism (after a novel by Sinclair Lewis); "Main Street will never vote for a liberal politician"
  • Main Street is the metonym for a generic street name (and often the official name) of the primary retail street of a village, town, or small city in many parts of the world.
    florist
  • (floral) resembling or made of or suggestive of flowers; "an unusual floral design"
  • A person who sells and arranges plants and cut flowers
  • someone who grows and deals in flowers; "the florist made up an attractive bouquet"
  • a shop where flowers and ornamental plants are sold
main street florist - Main Street
Main Street (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) (B&N Classics)
Main Street (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) (B&N Classics)
Main Street, by Sinclair Lewis, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
Biographies of the authors
Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
Footnotes and endnotes
Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
Comments by other famous authors
Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
Bibliographies for further reading
Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. “This is America—a town of a few thousand, in a region of wheat and corn and dairies and little groves.” So Sinclair Lewis—recipient of the Nobel Prize and rejecter of the Pulitzer—prefaces his novel Main Street. Lewis is brutal in his depictions of the self-satisfied inhabitants of small-town America, a place which proves to be merely an assemblage of pretty surfaces, strung together and ultimately empty.
Brooke Allen holds a Ph.D. in English literature from Columbia University. She is a book critic whose work has appeared in numerous publications including The Atlantic Monthly, The New Criterion, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Hudson Review, and The New Leader. A collection of her essays, Twentieth Century Attitudes, will be published in 2003.

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Flushing, Queens
Flushing, Queens
Main Street Flushing, Queens, NYC Flushing lies at the end of the No. 7 subway line and is one of the outermost neighborhoods served by the subway. It is best known as New York's 2nd Chinatown, and the only higher concentration of Chinese outside of Asia is in the more famous Chinatown of Lower Manhattan. The intersection at Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue is the 3rd busiest in the city, after Times Square and Herald Square. It was not always like this- Flushing has one of the deepest histories of any place in the city, and even of any place in the region. It was founded in 1644, twenty years after New Amsterdam, and was called Vlissingen after the port in Holland. At the time, it would have been a good day's journey from the most prominent regional settlement at Nieuw Amsterdam, and thus, the town initially followed a distinctly different culture from that of its famous neighbor. While New Amsterdam was solely devoting itself to making profit, without much real care for spiritual matters, Vlissingen had a bit of New England in it and attracted settlers of a more religious nature. Very early on English Quakers and others, fleeing the repression of the puritan Massachusetts colony, settled here to practice their beliefs freely. The governor of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant, himself something of a puritan, had already been admonished for attempting to establish religious orthodoxy- in 1654, his decision to expel Sephardic Jewish refugees was overturned by his bosses on the board of the Dutch West India Company. Thus chastised, he turned his spiritual attention towards the lesser village of Vlissingen and attempted to repress the Quaker population there. In response, Stuyvesant was presented in 1657 with a document known as the Flushing Remonstrance, regarded as the first document in American history to outline principles of religious freedom- principles which later were incorporated into the United States Constitution. A few years later, right before the English took over, Stuyvesant was ordered to cease all religious persecution in his colony. A few houses remain from this time, which is amazing in a city like New York. It would astonish the residents of 17th century Vlissingen to see 21st century Flushing. 10 mile expedition to Old Vlissingen- from Forest Hills through Corona, Willets Point, colonial sights of Flushing, the World's Fair ruins, and back. December 2, 2010
Flower Shop
Flower Shop
On the longest day of the year the sun is still practically overhead at five p.m.

main street florist
main street florist
Main Street: (A Modern Library E-Book)
With Commentary by E. M. Forster, Dorothy Parker, H. L. Mencken, Lewis Mumford, Rebecca West, Sherwood Anderson, Malcolm Cowley, Alfred Kazin, Constance Rourke, and Mark Schorer Main Street is the climax of civilization," Sinclair Lewis declared with a typical blend of seriousness and irony. "That this Ford car might stand in front of the Bon Ton Store, Hannibal invaded Rome and Erasmus wrote in Oxford cloisters." Main Street, the story of an idealistic young woman's attempts to reform her small town, brought Lewis immediate acclaim when it was published in 1920. It remains one of the essential texts of the American scene. Lewis Mumford observed: "In Main Street an American had at last written of our life with something of the intellectual rigor and critical detachment that had seemed so cruel and unjustified [in Charles Dickens and Matthew Arnold]. Young people had grown up in this environment, suffocated, stultified, helpless, but unable to find any reason for their spiritual discomfort. Mr. Lewis released them." Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951), was born in Sauk Centre, Minne-sota, and graduated from Yale in 1907; in 1930 he became the first American recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Main Street (1920) was his first critical and commercial success. Lewis's other noted books include Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), Dodsworth (1929), and It Can't Happen Here (1935).

With Commentary by E. M. Forster, Dorothy Parker, H. L. Mencken, Lewis Mumford, Rebecca West, Sherwood Anderson, Malcolm Cowley, Alfred Kazin, Constance Rourke, and Mark Schorer Main Street is the climax of civilization," Sinclair Lewis declared with a typical blend of seriousness and irony. "That this Ford car might stand in front of the Bon Ton Store, Hannibal invaded Rome and Erasmus wrote in Oxford cloisters." Main Street, the story of an idealistic young woman's attempts to reform her small town, brought Lewis immediate acclaim when it was published in 1920. It remains one of the essential texts of the American scene. Lewis Mumford observed: "In Main Street an American had at last written of our life with something of the intellectual rigor and critical detachment that had seemed so cruel and unjustified [in Charles Dickens and Matthew Arnold]. Young people had grown up in this environment, suffocated, stultified, helpless, but unable to find any reason for their spiritual discomfort. Mr. Lewis released them." Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951), was born in Sauk Centre, Minne-sota, and graduated from Yale in 1907; in 1930 he became the first American recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Main Street (1920) was his first critical and commercial success. Lewis's other noted books include Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), Dodsworth (1929), and It Can't Happen Here (1935).

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