FRUIT AND FLOWER BASKET : FLOWER BASKET

Fruit And Flower Basket : Pressed Flower Pendants.

Fruit And Flower Basket


fruit and flower basket
    flower basket
  • A basket usually used by the wedding flower girls to hold flower petals to be tossed down the aisle before the bride makes her entrance.
    fruit
  • cause to bear fruit
  • yield: an amount of a product
  • the ripened reproductive body of a seed plant
  • (of a tree or other plant) Produce fruit, typically at a specified time
fruit and flower basket - Art of
Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets Medium With Heartfelt Sympathy
Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets Medium With Heartfelt Sympathy
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85% (12)
Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, 1848, Delacroix
Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, 1848, Delacroix
Philadelphia museum of art, Leica 25mm/1.4 D Summilux. We do not know what was behind Delacroix's original decision to present five flower paintings at the Salon of 1849. In the end, however, he exhibited only two, keeping a more sizable shipment for the Exposition Universelle of 1855. Undoubtedly, he was predisposed to paint flowers by a passion for flower gardens and gardening, which he shared with his acquaintance George Sand and his great friend Josephine de Forget--in whose company the artist "prowled around rose bushes." Delacroix may have developed a now-forgotten pictorial or decorative scheme meant to unite the three paintings--A Basket of Flowers Overturned in a Park (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 67.187.60), Still Life with Flowers and Fruit (Philadelphia Museum of Art, John G. Johnson Collection, cat. 974), and A Vase of Flowers on a Console (Montauban, Musee Ingres, M.N.R. 162; D.51.3.2)--with two works that have since been lost, A Bed of Marguerites and Dahlias and Hydrangeas and Agapanthus by a Pond.1 Delacroix's references--perfectly outlined by art critic Theophile Gautier--to the masterpieces of the genre painted by Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (1634--1699), Jan Davidz. de Heem (1606 - 1684), and Jan van Huysum (1682 - 1749), as well as his admiration for certain Spanish and Italian still lifes, also explain his passion for a genre he had studied very little up to that point. Consideration should also be given to Delacroix's overriding desire during this period to attempt all genres and explore all techniques so that he could present himself as a great master, a "pure classic." We should note, however, that his interest in these attempts at still-life painting was intrinsic and personal enough to prevent him from selling or giving away any of the flower paintings he did for the Salon of 1849. In fact, he kept them until his death. Taking advantage of a hiatus in his great decorative commissions in Paris--he had just finished the library in the Palais Bourbon and had not yet begun the decorations for the Galerie d'Apollon in the Louvre or the church of Saint-Sulpice--Delacroix spent the entire first quarter of 1849 working on these flower paintings. Although the painter apparently lost his Journal for 1848--in a coach, as Pierre Andrieu says--leaving us few notes on his work for that year, numerous sketches show that, as early as that fall, he was preparing for his flower paintings and had, during the same period, already begun to bring one or another of the compositions to completion. On February 7, 1849, he visited the dealer Beugniet to look for a frame "for [his] flowers,"2 a fact that implies at least one of these works was already almost finished. Several drawings showing "marigolds" and "Indian roses"--including one dated November 13, 1848--reveal the artist's ongoing concerns in the autumn preceding the Salon. Throughout this period, his letters to Josephine de Forget abound with references to the arrangement of flowers growing in the garden at Champrosay. Whatever the case may be, Delacroix's Journal gives us a sufficiently accurate idea of the various stages of his work. For example, the entry for February 14, 1849, recalls a discussion with Adrien de Jussieu: "Had a long conversation with Jussieu after dinner on the subject of flowers in connection with my pictures; I have promised to visit him in the spring. He is going to show me the greenhouses and will arrange for me to have every opportunity to study there."3 This friendly exchange may have restored the artist's self-confidence because the next day, after he had gone back to work on the flower paintings and made progress particularly on the "fruit basket" (Philadelphia Museum of Art, John G. Johnson Collection, cat. 974), he noted: "I was feeling badly and did but little. That, however, put me back into a good mood for work, and I think that if I soon finish the things that are not done at all, the parts which are already pushed ahead will immediately look finished."4 On February 16, he added that he had also "worked on the Flowers and Fruits."5 During the spring of that year, Delacroix was not to rediscover the tranquility of nature or the inspiration of live models, since he did not stay at Champrosay, nor did he--within this period--take Jussieu up on his invitation to visit the Jardin des Plantes. Rather, he continued working regularly on his paintings in the studio, as is proven by various passages in his Journal: "Sunday, March 11 [1849}.--Got working early on the painting of the Hydrangeas and the Agapanthus. I concerned myself only with the latter."6 Although he explicitly told Constant Dutilleux that he wished to paint "these pieces of nature. . . as they present themselves to us in gardens" in his compositions for the Salon, Delacroix adhered to most of the genre's conventions regarding subject and presentation
Fruits & Flower Basket (HHD25.0)
Fruits & Flower Basket (HHD25.0)
D25.0 Fruit & Flower Basket Price : $ 95.00 (Price includes delivery) Orders for same day delivery must be in by midday

fruit and flower basket
fruit and flower basket
Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets Small Thoughtful Wishes
This thoughtful gift basket is filled with special treats for favorite friends and family to enjoy on any gift occasion. Send it to clients as a great thank you gift, or to your many friends and family for the holidays, it's designed to show you care without breaking the budget. They'll enjoy Angelina's Sweet Butter Cookies, 2 packages Gourmet Chocolate Cocoa, Vanilla Wafer Cookie, Chocolate Wafer Cookie and Petite Fruit Bonbon Candy. Each gift is hand crafted with attention to detail, tied with ribbons and includes a personalized gift message from you to convey your best wishes. Manufactured by Art of Appreciation Gift Baskets.

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