SHEPARD FAIREY OBAMA HOPE T SHIRT : HOPE T SHIRT

Shepard Fairey Obama Hope T Shirt : Blue And White T Shirt : Kill Obama T Shirt

Shepard Fairey Obama Hope T Shirt


shepard fairey obama hope t shirt
    shepard fairey
  • Frank Shepard Fairey (born February 15, 1970) is an American contemporary artist, graphic designer, and illustrator who emerged from the skateboarding scene and is currently active in Cincinnati, Ohio. He first became known for his "Andre the Giant Has a Posse" (…OBEY…
    t shirt
  • T Shirt is a 1976 album by Loudon Wainwright III. Unlike his earlier records, this (and the subsequent 'Final Exam') saw Wainwright adopt a full blown rock band (Slowtrain) - though there are acoustic songs on T-Shirt, including a talking blues.
  • jersey: a close-fitting pullover shirt
  • A T-shirt (T shirt or tee) is a shirt which is pulled on over the head to cover most of a person's torso. A T-shirt is usually buttonless and collarless, with a round neck and short sleeves.
  • A short-sleeved casual top, generally made of cotton, having the shape of a T when spread out flat
    obama
  • Barack (1961–), 44th president of the US, since 2009; full name Barack Hussein Obama. A Democrat, he is the first African American to be elected to the presidency. Nobel Peace Prize (2009)
  • A surname from the African language Luo
  • Barack Hussein Obama II (; born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States. He is the first African American to hold the office.
  • Obama is a surname.
    hope
  • Grounds for believing that something good may happen
  • A feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen
  • be optimistic; be full of hope; have hopes; "I am still hoping that all will turn out well"
  • a specific instance of feeling hopeful; "it revived their hope of winning the pennant"
  • expect and wish; "I trust you will behave better from now on"; "I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise"
  • A person or thing that may help or save someone
shepard fairey obama hope t shirt - OBEY: Supply
OBEY: Supply & Demand - The Art of Shepard Fairey - 20th Anniversary Edition
OBEY: Supply & Demand - The Art of Shepard Fairey - 20th Anniversary Edition
From Obey to Obama and all that s in between, Supply & Demand, The Art of Shepard Fairey - 20th Anniversary Edition expands upon the previous version of this book and adds 100 new pages of illustrations and text to showcase Fairey s entire body of work, a massive retrospective covering 20 colorful years.

Recently thrust into the spotlight for his image of President-elect Barack Obama, Fairey helped catalyze a movement from his unique vantage at the intersection of art, popular culture and politics. The book includes versions of the image as well as a copy of correspondence from the soon-to-be President himself thanking Mr. Fairey for his support.

Through the lens of esteemed writers and critics such as Carlo McCormick, Steven Heller, Henry Rollins, Rob Walker, Roger Gastman and more, readers can learn about Shepard Fairey, the roots of the omnipresent OBEY street art campaign, his design practice and prolific gallery exhibitions.

This massive book pulls no punches and all areas of the enigmatic artist's work, travels and travails are illuminated. From exhibitions, posters, flyers, silkscreens and stickers to high altitude pursuits, citations and police beatings, it's all documented in a museum quality layout and binding. The evidence is in, and it's clear that Shepard Fairey is not one to rest on his laurels, the work must go on.
For both long time fans wanting the complete collection and those just curious to know what this OBEY business is all about, Supply and Demand is the answer.

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Poster of Barack Obama by Shephard Fairey (2008)
Poster of Barack Obama by Shephard Fairey (2008)
"Barack Obama born 1961 Honolulu, Hawaii" "Shepard Fairey’s Barack Obama “Hope” poster became the iconic campaign image for the first African American president of the United States. Early in 2008, the Los Angeles-based graphic designer and graffiti artist produced his first Obama portrait, with a stenciled face, visionary upward glance, and the caption “Progress.” In this second version, Fairey repeated the heroic pose and patriotic color scheme, substituting the slogan “Hope.” The artist’s intention that the image be widely reproduced and “go viral” on the Internet exceeded his greatest expectations. The campaign sold 50,000 official posters; a San Francisco streetwear company produced T-shirts; grassroots organizations disseminated hundreds of thousands of stickers; and a free downloadable version generated countless repetitions. Although the reproductions rarely convey the elegant surface patterning seen in this original collage, they forged an unprecedented and powerful icon for Barack Obama’s historic campaign." "Shephard Fairey (born 1970) Hand-finished collage, stencil, and acrylic on paper, 2008 Gift of the Heather and Tony Podesta Collection in honor of Mary K. Podesta NGA.2008.52" "Selected Acquisitions "When the National Portrait Gallery opened to the public in 1968 six years after it was established by Congress, it had fewer than 500 objects in its permanent collection. Today its collection contains nearly 20,000 works of art." "Each portrait that becomes part of the Portrait Gallery’s permanent Collection is approved by its Commission, which meets twice yearly. Of paramount concern is the importance of the sitter’s impact on American history. The Commissioners then address issues such as the quality of the object or the significance of the image as it relates to the subject’s biography. In addition to paintings and sculpture, the museum collects photographs, prints, and drawings. In the future, film may also be an important part of our collection." "Throughout its history, the National Portrait Gallery has depended on the generosity of donors to enhance its collection. In this selection, many memorable portraits are from gracious benefactors."
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Smithsonian American Art Museum
This is Shepard Fairey’s original Barack Obama “Hope” poster – which is a hand-finished collage, stencil and acrylic on paper design. It wasn’t widely known that this was a piece of folk art. Shepard Fairey’s Barack Obama “Hope” poster became the iconic campaign image for the first African American president of the United States. Early in 2008, the Los Angeles-based graphic designer and graffiti artist produced his first Obama portrait, with a stenciled face, visionary upward glance, and the caption “Progress.” In this second version, Fairey repeated the heroic pose and patriotic color scheme, substituting the slogan “Hope.” The artist’s intention that the image be widely reproduced and “go viral” on the Internet exceeded his greatest expectations. The campaign sold 50,000 official posters; a San Francisco streetwear company produced T-shirts; grassroots organizations disseminated hundreds of thousands of stickers; and a free downloadable version generated countless repetitions. Although the reproductions rarely convey the elegant surface patterning seen in the original collage, they forged an unprecedented and powerful icon for Barack Obama’s historic campaign.

shepard fairey obama hope t shirt
shepard fairey obama hope t shirt
MAYDAY: The Art of Shepard Fairey
Drawing on work from the final exhibition before the closing of New York's seminal Deitch Projects, MAYDAY is simultaneously a call for heightened awareness and a celebration of the rebirth embodied in revolutionary movements. MAYDAY - The Art of Shepard Fairey is published as a celebration of this evocative collection of paintings from one of the most important artists of our time. Portraits of advocates of the working class and oppressed define the collection. Fairey stakes the claim that artists, musicians and writers such as Joe Strummer, Jean Michel Basquiat, Woody Guthrie and Cornel West all have parts to play in stimulating response to injustice. With energy and urgency befitting the title MAYDAY, Fairey captures the radical spirit of his subjects, using portraiture to celebrate the artists, musicians and political activists he most admires. Says Fairey, These people I'm portraying were all revolutionary, in one sense or another. They started out on the margins of culture and ended up changing the mainstream. When we celebrate big steps that were made in the past, it reminds us that big steps can be made in the future. In Fairey's mind, the persistence of difficulties in the political, environmental, economic, and cultural arenas points to the definition of May Day as a distress signal: By now we thought we would be in post-Bush utopia, but we're still having to call attention to these problems. Like any mayday call, however, the sounding of the alarm also brings hope for help on the way. If we stay silent, there s no hope, Fairey muses. But if we make noise, if we put our ideas out there, then maybe we can make a change like the people in the portraits have done.

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