Syllabus

Instructor: G. Niemeyer

If a human plays chess against a machine, what stakes are involved for humanity, technology, industry, and culture? How do human performances change if they occur between two bodies, between a body and a machine, or between two bodies mediated by a machine? 

As you read these lines, are you imagining a person addressing you, are you interpreting text, or are you looking at a machine? Does your experience change because you are black, white, hispanic, asian, male, female, old or young? Does your experience change because I am black, white, hispanic, asian, male, female, old or young? Would it matter more if we met in person? Would it matter more if you could insert your reply or comment right here? Would you sign your comment with your name, and your photo, or an avatar that you created? 

American Cybercultures introduces tools to think through such questions of performance, existence and mediation. Students engage creatively with art and design assignments, and with many online exercises (including some work on basic web programming, HTML, and Javascript). 

In this course, students connect human questions with technical concerns where art, technology and culture meet. Together, they question and construct possibilities for new performance of race and gender, and understand, produce and change American Cyberculture, if even just by one bit.

You can find the podcast to lectures here: http://webcast.berkeley.edu/course_details_new.php?seriesid=2011-B-4771&semesterid=2011-B

Most assignments for this course will be entered via Bspace
Subscribe to the Bspace Web page as well.