SILK FLOWER HANGING BASKET : HANGING BASKET

SILK FLOWER HANGING BASKET : COOKIE BOUQUET KNOXVILLE.

Silk Flower Hanging Basket


silk flower hanging basket
    hanging basket
  • A basket or similar container that can be suspended from a building by a small rope or chain and in which decorative flowering plants are grown
  • A hanging basket is a suspended container used for growing decorative plants. Typically they are hung from buildings, where garden space is at a premium, and from street furniture for environmental enhancement.
    silk flower
  • Artificial flowers and imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, for example, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles for commercial or residential decoration.
silk flower hanging basket - Artificial Dark
Artificial Dark Violet/Blue Wisteria Hanging Basket
Artificial Dark Violet/Blue Wisteria Hanging Basket
This artificial wisteria plant is handcrafted by House of Silk Flower, and is just dripping with clusters of vibrant dark violet/blue flowers. Each bush is securely "potted" in a designer reed and metal hanging basket, featuring a sturdy off-center metal hook. The overall dimensions are measured leaf tip to leaf tip: 32" diameter X 32" high. Measurements are approximate, and will be determined by your final shaping of the plant upon unpacking it. No arranging is necessary, only minor shaping, with the way in which we package and ship our products. This product is only recommended for indoor use.

84% (19)
The Claim
The Claim
[chalk, hand toned and printed photograph, 1998] On the 27th January 1832 four men, Christopher Davis, William Clarke, Thomas Gregory and Joseph Kayes, were hanged in public, on the roof of the Cumberland Road Gaol, in the centre of Bristol. Numerous others were sentenced to imprisonment and transportation. They were convicted for their part in the infamous Bristol riots, that occurred in October of the previous year, sparked not least by the defeat of the Reform Act by the House of Lords. The gaol itself had been partly destroyed during the riot, and the Governor of the gaol, William Humphries subsequently made claim for all his losses from the City of Bristol. The claim is a remarkable list, and openened debate into if and why Humphries had such vast amount of goods in his possession. It also seems to confirm speculation that Humphries sold large amounts of drink to the prisoners; practice which was later condemned and made illegal. After the legal deliberation, Humphries and other claimants recieved compensation for there losses, oddly paid by the Bristol Guardians of the Poor. "...15,000 persons being then and there unlawfully, riotously and tumultuously assembled together to the disturbances of the public peace with force and aims etc. unlawfully and feloniously demolished and destroyed a certain house situate and being in the parish aforesaid (Bedminster) within the City and County (of Bristol) then and there also with force and aims etc at the same time unlawfully damaged and destroyed divers large quantities of fixtures, furnitures and goods, to wit: 30 tables, 30 cupboards, 100 shelves, 100 chairs, 10 sideboards, 10 wardrobes, 10 desks, 10 sofas, 10 bedsteads, with furniture, 10 other bedsteads, 50 beds, 50 bolsters, 50 pillows, 10 mattresses, 10 palliasses, 2000 pounds of feathers, 2000 pounds of hair, 20 stools, 300 yards of carpetings, 20 carpets, 20 hearth-rugs, 100 yards of floorcloth, 100 yards of baize, 50 mats, 10 pier glasses, 10 mirrors, 10 chimney glasses, 30 looking-glasses, 20 fenders, 20 sets of fire-irons, 20 fire-guards, 20 firescreens, 20 chests of drawers, 20 towel-horses, 20 clothes-horses, 20 washstands, 20 night-tables, 20 night-chairs, 5 pair of bed-steps, 20 window curtains, 50 bed curtains, 50 other curtains, 50 window blinds, 50 sun blinds, 50 venetian blinds, 10 dressing cases, 10 linen chests, 10 clothes chests, 20 other chests, 10 clothes baskets, 20 trunks, 20 boxes, 5 piano-fortes, 5 guitars, 5 other musical instruments, 5 ink stands, 5 bagatelle tables, 5 clocks, 5 dials, 5 globes, 5 thermometers, 5 legrests, 5 telescopes, 5 saddles, 5 bridles, 5 bird cages, 5 work-boxes, 5 work baskets, 50 pictures, 50 prints, 50 picture frames, 10 maps, 100 china ornaments, 20 figures, 5 models, 5 fishing rods, 5 whips, 20 swords, 20 cutlasses, 20 guns, 20 fowling pieces, 20 muskets, 20 pistols, 10 umbrellas, 5 umbrella stands, 10 lamps, 5 glass cases, 50 stuffed birds, 1000 volumes of books, 50 quires of paper, 1000 pamphlets, 10 coal scuttles, 10 table covers, 10 sideboard covers, 50 table mats, 50 other mats, 10 knife cases, 10 tea urns, 10 tea caddies, 20 trays, 20 waiters, 50 candlesticks, 50 pairs of snuffers, 50 snuffer stands, 10 iron rings, 50 dish covers, 20 kettles, 10 fountains, 5 plate warmers, 5 dressers, 50 saucepans, 10 boilers, 10 coppers, 10 frying pans, 10 grid-irons, 10 spits, 10 sieves, 5 warming-pans, 5 pairs of scales, 50 weights, 5 corkscrews, 20 ladles, 20 mops, 20 brooms, 50 baskets, 5 meat screens, 5 tripods, 100 casks, 100 tubs, 50 vats, 50 pails, 50 buckets, 50 dishes, 200 plates, 50 cups, 50 saucers, 50 basins, 50 jugs, 50 mugs, 50 pans, 100 jars, 20 decanters, 20 finger glasses, 50 tumblers, 100 wine glasses, 200 other glasses, 500 bottles, 5 glass globes, 5 sets of casters, 10 lanterns, 200 knives, 5 binns, 200 gallons of cider, 200 gallons of beer, 200 gallons of wine, 200 gallons of brandy, 200 gallons of Holland's gin, 200 gallons of rum, 200 gallons of whisky, 500 gallons of spirituous liquors, 200 pounds of pickles, 200 pounds of preserves, 20 spades, 20 rakes, 20 shovels, 20 pitchforks, 20 hoes, 20 trowels, 20 hatchets, 20 hammers, 20 pick-axes, 20 flower-stands, 100 flower pots, 500 plants, 500 shrubs, 500 flower roots, 200 pairs of sheets, 50 pillow cases, 50 bolster cases, 30 quilts, 30 counterpanes, 100 blankets, 50 table cloths, 100 napkins, 100 towels, 500 yards of linen, 500 yards of flannel, 500 yards of cloth, 500 yards of silk, 20 coats, 20 greatcoats, 20 pairs of breeches, 20 pairs of silk pantaloons, 20 pairs of trousers, 20 pairs of drawers, 20 pairs of gaiters, 20 waistcoats, 20 hats, 50 shirts, 50 caps, 50 pairs of stockings, 50 pair of boots, 50 pair of shoes, 100 pocket handkerchiefs, 100 other handkerchiefs, 10 bonnets, 20 gowns, 20 shawls, 50 petticoats, 10 cloaks, 10 pelisses, 10 muffs, 10 tippets, 50 pairs of gloves, 50 aprons, 50 shifts, 50 pairs of stays, 100 yards of ribbon, 20 brushes, 20 razors, 5 razor stro
Asia - China / Guizhou + Guangxi
Asia - China / Guizhou + Guangxi
The Sisters’ Rice Festival is sometimes called Sisters’ Meal Festival or Eat Sisters’ Rice Festival. The legend is there was once an old man and his wife who had three beautiful daughters. One day while they played on the riverside, the young girls felt lovesick. Zhang Guolao, a bearded God who carried a bamboo tubular drum, possessed the spirits of the girls, telling them to prepare five-colored rolls of glutinous rice filled with shrimp, fish and other special things. When young men came down from the mountain, the beautiful girls presented the rice to them. In this way, the young girls found their marriage partners Sisters’ Meal festival, which takes in the Spring, is specific to southeast Guizhou. During the third lunar month in Shidong, Taijiang County in Southeast Guizhou Province, girls flock to the mountains to collect wild flowers and berries to dye the glutinous rice known as Sister’s Rice and everyone cooks up a storm! A storm of glutinous rice that is — dyed in several colors and formed into balls. Each girl prepares her rice with a symbol then wraps it in a handkerchief or put inside small baskets The Miao minority “Sisters’ Rice Festival” is a celebration of spring and of love. Dressed in finest embroidered and appliqued clothing, adorned in all their freshly shined silver jewelry, young women set out to attract a suitable mate. That’s the traditional goal, but fun is the name of the game! Two, sometimes three, festival days are filled with dancing, singing, eating, drinking lots of rice wine, watching bull fights and cockfights, and horse racing. The Festival brings villagers from many remote areas together, the girls beautifully dressed in their embroidered costumes. A kaleidoscope of colors, local customs and traditions, signature costumes and hairstyles provide a never-ending fashion show. It is said that the Miao originated from the egg of a butterfly that emerged from a maple tree. The butterfly married a bubble and laid twelve eggs. A mythical bird called the Jiyu watched over the eggs for twelve years and finally they hatched into a Miao man known as Jiangyang, a Thunder God known as Leigong, a water buffalo, snake, dragon, tiger, centipede, elephant and four other omens. All of these symbols are found in the exquisite embroidery and colorful decoration of these artistically talented people. In anticipation of the Sisters’ Rice Festival, the grandmothers, mothers and other female relatives polish and shine the collection of silver neck rings, bracelets, anklets, earrings, hair pins and combs, rings and pendants, phoenix crowns and headpieces that the young courting-age girls will wear. The Miao believe that silver, representing light, dispels evil spirits. Silver is also a symbol of wealth and beauty, and some young women wear several kilograms of it at one time. Dazzling embroidered skirts, blouses, aprons and jackets are decorated with many different tooled silver ornaments. Pretty necks are encircled with bands of silver and linking silver chains that support large shining lockets, glittering beads and hanging tassels. Elaborate silver headpieces crown the heads of the girls as they proudly display their self-made costumes. The festival always begins with special family meals. Sharing traditional foods such as rice that has been colored with the dyes of different leaves, berries and flowers, then cooked in bamboo tubes, and homemade rice wine, is similarly practised among the many Miao tribes. Some of the dyed rice is molded into balls that hold hidden treasures. These rice balls are presented to the young men who come to visit, and each treasure has a different meaning. Pine needles mean “You should give me embroidery needles.” and corn silk is a suggestion of fine yarn. A thorn tells the lucky fellow “You are the one!” Chopsticks or red flower pistils say, “Let’s marry quickly — the sooner the better.” And a single chopstick, some garlic or chili means, “Find someone else!” Meanwhile, you will find many elders at the cockfighting competitions, trading at the daylong markets, or leisurely rowing long dugout canoes on the river beside the festival ground. This is a time of camaraderie and “catching up.” Mid-morning approaches, and the elders rush off to the bullfights. Excitement rises as the mighty bulls lock horns, trying to wrestle each other to the ground. All day long, one bull after another is defeated and then the final match begins. The winning bull brings great honor and riches to his owner for the following year, so although it is festival, the participants enter into the fights with a certain seriousness. Such anxiety calls for much merriment, eating, drinking and friendly betting. The champion bull’s horns are festooned with chickens, ducks, red ribbons and flowers as he is led around the battleground and through the town, snorting proudly for all to see. Finally he is bathed in the soothing waters of the Qingshui. The crowds thin out as people join picnics and sp

silk flower hanging basket
silk flower hanging basket
Window Sil Flowers Nest Anticipation Mini Flag
A gentle scene as two birds begin their nest together, waiting in anticipation for their young ones. Our Silk Reflections Flags are made with a heat sublimation process for a richer and deeper color and detail display in our flags. An amazing process to make this light weight and sleek flag one of the best Evergreen flags in the market. Flag Size: 12.5" x 18"

Make an impression! These beautiful, brightly colored, creatively designed flags are the perfect way to greet someone to your home or garden. Made with tight-stitching and high quality material to last and last. Our silk reflections regular size flags are extra-durable, weather-wear- and fade-resistant, sure to hang proudly in front of your home for month after long-lasting month.

Comments