PART WORN TYRES NORTH EAST - PART WORN TYRES

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Part Worn Tyres North East


part worn tyres north east
    north east
  • Lying toward, near, or facing the northeast
  • (of a wind) Coming from the northeast
  • North East is a constituency of the London Assembly. It is represented by Jennette Arnold who was directly elected at the 2004 London Assembly election after previously being elected by the Labour Party list in the 2000 London Assembly election.
  • Of or denoting the northeastern part of a specified country, region, or town, or its inhabitants
  • The North East is a sub-region of the London Plan corresponding to the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Newham, Waltham Forest, Redbridge, Havering, Barking and Dagenham, and the City of London.
  • northeast: to, toward, or in the northeast
    tyres
  • (tyre) Sur: a port in southern Lebanon on the Mediterranean Sea; formerly a major Phoenician seaport famous for silks
  • A tire (in American English) or tyre (in British English) is a ring-shaped covering that fits around a wheel rim to protect it and enable better vehicle performance by providing a flexible cushion that absorbs shock while keeping the wheel in close contact with the ground.
  • A rubber covering, typically inflated or surrounding an inflated inner tube, placed around a wheel to form a flexible contact with the road
  • A strengthening band of metal fitted around the rim of a wheel
  • (tyre) tire: hoop that covers a wheel; "automobile tires are usually made of rubber and filled with compressed air"
    part
  • something determined in relation to something that includes it; "he wanted to feel a part of something bigger than himself"; "I read a portion of the manuscript"; "the smaller component is hard to reach"; "the animal constituent of plankton"
  • separate: go one's own way; move apart; "The friends separated after the party"
  • To some extent; partly (often used to contrast different parts of something)
  • partially: in part; in some degree; not wholly; "I felt partly to blame"; "He was partially paralyzed"
    worn
  • Very tired
  • Damaged and shabby as a result of much use
  • careworn: showing the wearing effects of overwork or care or suffering; "looking careworn as she bent over her mending"; "her face was drawn and haggard from sleeplessness"; "that raddled but still noble face"; "shocked to see the worn look of his handsome young face"- Charles Dickens
  • affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
  • (wear) be dressed in; "She was wearing yellow that day"

Balhousie Castle (5 of 8) - The Battle of the North Inch
Balhousie Castle (5 of 8) - The Battle of the North Inch
We have now come round to the east side of Balhousie Castle, which looks out across Perth's famed North Inch. While you work out which parts of the masonry are old and which parts are very old, I will wander off the subject for a moment and write about the interesting history of the North Inch! The North Inch is a big paddock, a riverside meadow (the river of course being the Tay), which has been used by the good folk of St John's town of Perth for recreational pursuits for centuries. And it still is! The northern end has been purloined by the golfing fraternity and other parts are marked out as soccer and cricket pitches. Exciting though I am sure many of the matches held here are, the most exciting match ever played was held on a Monday in late September 1396. The match was 'played out' between two 30 man teams and by its conclusion, 48 of the participants were dead upon the field! Remarkably, six hundred and fifteen years after the event, most of the details of what happened in what came to be known as the Battle of the North Inch or the Battle of the Clans, are well known. It was such a remarkable event, even for its time, that most of what happened was chronicled at the time. But while we know what happened, exactly who was involved and why they were involved in the first place, is less well understood. The conglomeration of clans known as Clan Chattan were undoubtedly one of the protagonists, the other team being said to have been Clan Kay. Unfortunately we don't know who Clan Kay were, but it is thought to have been either Clan Cameron or Clan Davidson, both of whom played a part in the original quarrel. The most favoured version of events these days is that the Camerons owed Clan Chattan rent, and when it wasn't forthcoming, Clan Chattan went and helped themselves to Cameron cattle (a time honoured and perfectly reasonable way of resolving such issues!). The Camerons however, either didn't see it that way or disagreed about the value of their cattle, with the result that hostilities ensued! In (probably) 1386, things came to a head when a party of some 400 Camerons, returning from raiding Clan Chattan lands in upper Speyside, were overtaken by a force of Clan Chattan men at Invernahavon on upper Speyside. Clan Chattan (the Clan of the Cat) consisted (and still does) of a confederation of clans, consisting of MacIntoshes, MacPhersons, Davidsons and various others. As the protagonists faced off, the Clan Chattan had the numerical advantage, but in a example so typical of so many incidents in Scottish history, at all levels from clan to national, internal issues came to assume a greater importance than the common goal of defeating the Camerons. The particular issue was a disagreement as to whether the Davidsons or the Macphersons should occupy the right wing of the 'army'. Now this may not sound terribly important, but the fact was that in the Middle Ages the right wing was the position of honour and if someone else was posted there, it meant they were considered more important than you. And to a Highlander, pride was everything. After a fair amount of Gaelic shouting and cursing, the Macphersons withdrew in disgust from the army, leaving the Davidsons, looking rather pleased with themselves, on the right wing. Unfortunately all this tipped the numerical advantage in favour of the Camerons who, while the Macphersons sat scowling on a hilltop watching, managed to defeat their pursuers. The story goes that the following day, the Macphersons, having finished sulking, decided to rejoin the Chattan confederation and attacked the Camerons with such vigour that they changed the previous day's defeat into victory. So, getting back to the Battle of the North Inch, the belligerents were either the Clan Chattan on the one side and Clan Cameron on the other, still arguing about the price of cows, or (more probably in my opinion) the Macphersons of Clan Chattan on the one side against the Davidsons on the other, arguing about who should stand on the right of the battle line! Whoever they were and whatever the cause of the dispute, their feudal superiors, tiring of the incessant raiding and pillaging the whole dispute was continuing to cause, came up with the bright idea of settling the issue once and for all, with a 30 aside clan battle here on the North Inch, an idea which had the added advantage that everyone else could watch! As September 1396 wore on, something of a carnival atmosphere prevailed in Perth. The royal court of King Robert III moved from Stirling to Perth and hamburger stalls were set up around the North Inch for the crowds (presumably by the Macdonalds!). The still extant records of the Royal Exchequer show that the sum of 14 pounds and 2 shillings was paid out "For timber, iron, and making of a battlefield for 60 persons fighting on the Inch at Perth". When the big day finally arrived, the two groups of clan champions arrived, armed with bows and arro
Choir stall (47)
Choir stall (47)
Holy Trinity, Balsham, Cambridgeshire The Brass of John Sleford records he "gave these stalls" and it is to him that the Parish Church owes the Chancel seating and the lower part of the Chancel Screen (about which more below). He became Rector c. 1367 but until 1377-78 he was a "king's clerk" and served king Edward III in the "government supplies departments" as Keeper of the Great Wardrobe and Keeper of the Privy Wardrobe of the Tower, before that he had been Clerk of Works; a brother (?) William Sleford was Clerk of Works and later Dean of the king's Free Chapel of S. Stephen at Westminster. In these positions, Sleford was in contact with all the major craftsmen and suppliers of his time. He lost his positions when the young king Richard II came to the throne in 1377 and it was probably after this that Sleford turned his mind to church fabric at Balsham. The reason why the Parish Church has such magnificent seating is probably because of Sleford's "connections" and also because the whole parish was "Church property" and there was a Bishop's residence that might have entailed occasions when a number of clerics might be in attendance and needing seating. The furniture blocks the south access door (no need then to make sure what was done was 'in keeping' with the rest of the church!). The Chancel seating in no way represents either the medieval staffing at the Parish Church or a large "choir" in the modern sense. At one time there were 28 seats but in the 1870s when the doorway in the North side of the Chancel was pierced to provide access to new vestries the seat on that side was removed and, to match, another was taken from the South side whose place is apparent as the moulding along the wall stops a "seat-space" from the remaining seats. After repair, the seats were replaced badly so that at the SW and SE corners the lower arm rests no longer coincide as they ought. It is likely the seating was carved in East Anglia for one of the figures (on the north side, third from the front) is of a man wearing either a pleated "cotte," cloak or kilt; he has stilts strapped to his legs, his left hand holds a dog on a leash. That could represent a "Fen Fowler" going about his busi┬Čness catching fish, eels or water-fowl amidst the (then mainly) undrained fen. The seats are called "Misericords" (from Latin "have mercy"), When first placed they were hinged and beneath each was located a small ledge which enabled an occupant to "perch'* while seeming to stand, hence the seats "had mercy" on occupants tired of standing a long time during church services. Because the ledges were hidden, mediaeval woodcarvers had free rein to exercise their imagination and carve all manner of scenes, often ribald and sarcastic as they mocked pretension, hypocrisy, and current morality, es-pecially that of the clergy, on the basis "out of sight, out of mind !" You will find some of the seats at Balsham can be lifted up; others vanished long ago. There are two sets of arms to each seat for use when sitting (at lower level) and again when standing (at upper level). The carving has in many instances become mutilated over time but, with some imagination, figures of animals, birds, men and angels can be recognised. The desk ends have holes in the top, probably for candle sconces (like those on the riddle posts about the altar); the desks themselves bear graffiti from the centuries. Holy Trinity, Balsham, Cambridgeshire The Brass of John Sleford records he "gave these stalls" and it is to him that the Parish Church owes the Chancel seating and the lower part of the Chancel Screen (about which more below). He became Rector c. 1367 but until 1377-78 he was a "king's clerk" and served king Edward III in the "government supplies departments" as Keeper of the Great Wardrobe and Keeper of the Privy Wardrobe of the Tower, before that he had been Clerk of Works; a brother (?) William Sleford was Clerk of Works and later Dean of the king's Free Chapel of S. Stephen at Westminster. In these positions, Sleford was in contact with all the major craftsmen and suppliers of his time. He lost his positions when the young king Richard II came to the throne in 1377 and it was probably after this that Sleford turned his mind to church fabric at Balsham. The reason why the Parish Church has such magnificent seating is probably because of Sleford's "connections" and also because the whole parish was "Church property" and there was a Bishop's residence that might have entailed occasions when a number of clerics might be in attendance and needing seating. The furniture blocks the south access door (no need then to make sure what was done was 'in keeping' with the rest of the church!). The Chancel seating in no way represents either the medieval staffing at

part worn tyres north east
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