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WW1 Australian Women Doctors

Australian Women Doctors who served in WW1
by Jennifer Baker
 
 

The Following is a list of Australian Women Doctors who served in WW1 and the service they served in 

unable to serve in an Australian Units because of Australian Govt Policy at the time, many of our most intelligent women of the time left Australia and served in other units overseas.

Because they didn't serve under an Australian unit they have never been recognized here in Australia.

25 Australian women Doctors went to WW1 
 
Deaths: 1 Dr. Laura Forster






 

KATIE LOUISA ARDILL, ( Brice)

1886 - 1955) medical practitioner
Biography Entry
Medal card of Ardill, Kathleen  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
Voluntary Aid Detachment British Red Cross Society
Citadel Military Hospital Doctor
Medal card of Ardill, Katie WO 372/23links to the Catalogue 
British Red Cross Society
In 1914 at the outbreak of World War 1 Dr Ardill applied to serve with the Australian Expeditionary Forces and was refused because she was female. Wanting to serve overseas, she made her own way to Egypt in 1915 and then onto Britain where she joined the British Expeditionary Forces as one of the first women doctors in field services.

Dr Ardill was appointed to the medical staff at the County Middlesex War Hospital, St.Albans, England in 1915. Her next appointment was at the Anglo-Belgian Military Hospital, Calais, France and was appointed to the rank of Captain. Dr Ardill served for four years including England, France and Egypt.
Under the British Red Cross Society, went to a Belgian hospital, and afterwards with the British Army to Napbury, the Dover military hospital, and the Citadel hospital, Cairo.

August 1919 Dr Ardill returned to Australia on board the Ulysses
Served in
  • Voluntary Aid Detachment British Red Cross Society
  •  British Red Cross Society
  • Royal Army Medical Corps

  • Bachelor of Medicine 
  • Master of Surgery 
M.B., Ch.M. : Doctor, B.R.C. and R.A.M.C., France, England and Egypt. 
Sailing 26th June, 1915, and Enlisting in England in August, served till March, 1916, with British Red Cross at Anglo-Beige Hospital, Calais. 
Then was with R.A.M.C. at St. Albans, England, till January, 1917, at Dover Military Hospital till May, 1918, and at Citadel Hospital, Cairo, with Army of Occupation. 
Recalled to England in July, 1919, and repatriated in October. 
Early education at Wellesley College


References:

IWM - Lives of the First World war - Entry 

British Army    Voluntary Aid Detachment     British Red Cross Society

British Army    Citadel Military Hospital         Doctor


Photo sourced from 







AGNES ELIZABETH LLOYD BENNETT,

 
(1872-1960), medical practitioner

Biography Entry
Medal card of Bennett, Agnes L  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross Doctor
In 1915 Agnes Bennett became the first female commissioned officer in the British Army, when as a captain she worked as a medical officer in war hospitals in Cairo. In 1916-17 she was in charge of a unit of the Scottish Women's Hospitals on the Serbian front

WW1 service: first female captain in the RAMC; 
MO, Scottish Women's Hospital in Greece;
served with the French Red Cross, 
then with NZMC RMO, 
Glasgow Royal Infirmary during the influenza epidemic in 1918

Served in
  • Scottish Women's Hospitals
  • French Red Cross
  • Royal Army Medical Corps
Photo above from photograph from the Biography Doctor Agnes Bennett by Cecil and Celia Manson
The photograph was taken in Edinburgh in 1899, when Agnes was a member of the Women's Medical School Committee

 


Dr Agnes Bennett, [between 1916-1917 ?]

Reference Number: PAColl-6972-12-25-1
"The Agnes Bennett Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library."

Dr Agnes Bennett. Seated portrait. Shows her in army uniform. Possibly taken between 1916-1917 while she was commanding officer of the 7th Medical Unit of the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service, Macedonia, Serbia, during World War I. Photographer unidentified





 
Dr Agnes Bennett of the Scottish Women's Hospitals,  American Unit
 IWM Photo 
Q 108182
 part of "IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM PRINTED BOOKS WOMEN'S BOXES COLLECTION" (photographs) Made by: Unknown
  
http://media.iwm.org.uk/iwm/mediaLib//373/media-373644/mid.jpg
 











Part of:
With the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service in the Serbian/Bulgarian war, Reference Number PAColl-6972-12 (30 digitised items)

Bennett, Agnes Elizabeth Lloyd, 1872-1960 : Photographs, Reference Number PAColl-6972 (36 digitised items)
British Army     French Red Cross    Doctor

Medal card of Bennett, Agnes L WO 372/23links to the Catalogue

Dr Agnes Bennett – Chief Medical Officer America Unit  4-Aug-16 1-Sep-17

 Scottish Hospital - A to Z personnel entry  

See Scottish Woman's Hospital Page 

Agnes Elizabeth Lloyd BENNETT OBE



 

ELEANOR ELIZABETH BOURNE,

(1878-1957), medical practitioner -
Biography Entry
 January 1916. She went to England at her own expense and served as a lieutenant of the Royal Army Medical Corps in the Endell Street military hospital, London, staffed entirely by women. Promoted major in 1917, she became medical officer to Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps.
Served in
  • Women's Hospital Corps - Endell Street Military Hospital
  •  Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps / Women's Auxiliary Army Corps
  • Royal Army Medical Corps

  
 M.B., Ch.M. : Lieutenant, R.A.M.C., and Medical Controller, W.A.A.C., England. Enlisting in London 1st May, 1916, after sailing privately, served at Endell St. Military Hospital till 31st December, 1917. Then transferring, was attached to Queen Mary''s Army Auxiliary Corps as Medical Controller, Northern Command, until the end of the War. Early education at Brisbane Grammar School.

The University of Sydney - BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE ENTRY

Photo sourced from Wikisource
http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Author:Eleanor_Elizabeth_Bourne




GRACE MARION BRIDGE

Grace Marion ( Cordingley ) 

M.A.; L.M.S.S.A. (Lond.) : Pathologist, Military Hospital, England. 

Sailing in March, 1915, was appointed in London as Pathologist Military Block, Royal Free Hospital, serving till the Armistice and returning to Australia via U.S.A. 

Early education at Sydney Girls'' High School. 

Later at the Women''s College






VERA SCANTLEBURY BROWN,

(1889-1946), medical practitioner
Biography Entry
In 1915 she joined the resident staff of the Children's Hospital. For the next three years she performed a herculean task coping with staff shortages and other difficulties due to wartime conditions.
In 1917 she sailed to England and was attached to the Royal Army Medical Corps as assistant surgeon to Dr L. Garrett Anderson at Endell Street Military Hospital. Returning to Australia in 1919
  
 
Served in
  • Women's Hospital Corps - Endell Street Military Hospital
  • Royal Army Medical Corps
 
 


 
 




ELIZABETH HAMILTON-BROWNE,

medical practitioner
from Sydney - Endell Street Military Hospital, with the Women's Hospital Corps, then with No.19 General Hospital, in Egypt; subsequently M/O in France, in charge of 500 American women clerks who had been lent to the British Army - some reminiscences in the University of Sydney archives
Medal card of Hamilton-Browne, Elizabeth J  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
Royal Army Medical Corps  Assistant Surgeon
Royal Army Medical Corps  Driver
Served in
  • Women's Hospital Corps - Endell Street Military Hospital
  • Royal Army Medical Corps
  
M.B., Ch.M. : Captain, R.A.M.C., England. 
Attached to Endell Street Military Hospital, London, 1916-.



British Army    Royal Army Medical Corps    Assistant Surgeon
British Army    Royal Army Medical Corps    Driver



SUSAN ANNIE BUCKINGHAM

  • Doctor 
  • Bachelor of Medicine 
  • Ch.B. (Edin.) 
  • Diploma in Public Health 

M.B., Ch.B. (Edin.), D.P.H. : Doctor, attached R.A.M.C., Egypt, 1918.

The University of Sydney - BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE ENTRY





EMMA BUCKLEY,

medical practitioner,
from Sydney - Endell Street Military Hospital, with the Women's Hospital Corps
Served in
  • Women's Hospital Corps - Endell Street Military Hospital
  • The Horsham Times  Friday 14 March 1919, page 4




 



EMMA ALBANI BUCKLEY-TURKINGTON

M.B. : Hon. Major, R.A.M.C., England. 

Sailing 5th May, 1915, and Enlisting in London in June, served as Pathologist at Lister Institute on laboratory work for A.I.F., 1915-16, and, after a short period at Endell St., 

at King George Military Hospital, London, till 1919, returning to Australia in February. 

Early education at Sydney Girls'' High School.



 

RACHEL CHAMPION,

medical practitioner
from Melbourne - Endell Street Military Hospital, with the Women's Hospital Corps - no papers, but family alive
Served in
  • Women's Hospital Corps - Endell Street Military Hospital
 
 
 

 
 

PHOEBE CHAPPLE,

(1879-1967), medical practitioner
She was the 1st woman doctor to be awarded The Military Medal.
Biography Entry
Biography Entry
Medal card of Chapple, Phoebe  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
Royal Army Medical Corps attached Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps  Doctor
 She left Adelaide in February 1917 for England and became attached first to the Royal Army Medical Corps and later to Queen Mary's Army 
 Served inAuxiliary Corps, although women were not accorded formal military status. Her first appointment was as surgeon at Cambridge Hospital, Aldershot. In November she went to France where she worked with the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps at Abbeville till August 1918 and also at Rouen and Le Havre. On the night of 29 May 1918 she was inspecting the women's camps when, because of intense bombing, she and forty women sheltered in trenches. A
direct hit killed nine and injured several others. For 'gallantry and devotion to duty' on this occasion, Dr Chapple received the rare award for a woman of the Military Medal.  She returned to Australia in 1919.
    •  Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps / Women's Auxiliary Army Corps
    • Royal Army Medical Corps
 







AWM Photo P10871.005
c 1917
Description: 
Studio portrait of Dr Phoebe Chapple. She was educated at the Advanced School for Girls in Grote Street, Adelaide before entering university aged 16. She gained her Bachelor of Science in 1898, and, inspired by South Australian women's advocate and Adelaide's first practising woman doctor, Dr Violet Plummer, Phoebe went on to study medicine. For academic excellence in her second year she was awarded the university's Elder Prize. She graduated as a doctor in 1904. During the First World War she became frustrated with the Australian army's refusal to appoint women doctors. She travelled to England in February 1917 to enlist in the Royal Army Medical Corps. She was appointed as surgeon to Cambridge Hospital in Aldershot. Later, she was attached to Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps (QMAAC) and moved to France. Chapple was accorded the honorary rank of captain and was one of the first two women doctors sent to the front. 

On 29 May 1918, Chapple was inspecting the QMAAC Camp 1 near Abbeville in France when it came under a German aerial bombing attack. Using the glow from a lorry that had been set on fire, German aircrew dropped three bombs on the compound. Two destroyed huts while a third exploded on a covered trench used by the women as a shelter. The explosion killed eight women and a ninth was mortally wounded. Six were slightly wounded. Working in the dark for hours, Phoebe moved through the destroyed trench, tending to the dead and wounded. 

For her actions during and following the air raid, Chapple was awarded a Military Medal (MM), the first woman doctor so decorated. The citation for the award reads: 'For gallantry and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. While the raid was in progress Doctor Chapple attended to the needs of the wounded regardless of her own safety.' At the time of recommending the award for Chapple, the Commander-In-Chief was unable to authorise a Military Cross, a comparable award given to officers, as the women did not hold commissions. A recommendation for a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) was considered more appropriate for the women though the MM was finally decided upon as it could only be won in the field. Dr Phoebe Chapple BSc MB BS MM died on 24 March 1967, aged 87 and was cremated, with full military honours, at Centennial Park Cemetery.





EVELINE ROSETTA COHEN

RAMC Dr Eveline Rosetta Cohen was the daughter of Mr and Mrs Samuel Benjamin, of Temple House Hobart, Aust.
Malta 25 Sept 1916 Embarked for Malta as part of the Women's Medical Unit RAMC.
She was on duty at Malta until 23 September 1917.

service bio at http://www.maltaramc.com/ladydoc/c/cohene.html#1916






LILIAN VIOLET COOPER,

Portrait of Lilian Cooper
(1861-1947), medical practitioner
Biography Entry
Medal card of Cooper, Lilian  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross  Doctor
She joined the Scottish Women's Hospitals in 1915, served for twelve months, including a time in Macedonia, and was awarded the Serbian Order of St Sava, fourth-class. She settled again in Brisbane after the war.
Served in

  • Scottish Women's Hospitals
  • French Red Cross


COOPER Dr Lilian, Doctor America Unit 1-Aug-16 1-Sep-17





GRACE CORDINGLY


Doctor MD in Scottish Women's Hospital - Serbia & Macedonia 1915

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=LxT5AwAAQBAJ&lpg=RA5-PA1961&ots=LGazjQt4z6&dq=GRACE%20CORDINGLY%20ww1&pg=RA5-PA1961#v=onepage&q=GRACE%20CORDINGLY%20ww1&f=true

 

 



ELSIE JEAN DALYELL,

 
(1881-1948), pathologist

Biography Entry
Medal card of Dalyell, Elsie Jean  WO 372/24links to the Catalogue
Medical Women attached Royal Army Medical Corps
Medal card of Dalyell, Elsie J  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross  Bacteriologist
She joined Lady Wimborne's Serbian Relief Fund unit which went to Skopje (Uskub) to help with the typhus epidemic in 1915. Rather to her annoyance, she was safe at the Addington Park war hospital, Croydon, when Skopje was overrun by the Bulgarians in October. In 1916 she joined the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service unit at Royaumont, France, and afterwards enlisted with the Royal Army Medical Corps, serving in Malta and Salonika, Greece. Early in 1919 she went to Constantinople to deal with cholera, and in June was appointed O.B.E.; she had been twice mentioned in dispatches.
 
Served in
        • Scottish Women's Hospitals
        • French Red Cross
        • Lady Wimborne's Serbian Relief Fund unit
        • Royal Army Medical Corps
 
O.B.E., M.B., Ch.M. : Medical Officer, R.A.M.C., Serbia, France, Malta, Salonika and Turkey. 
Enlisting in London in January, 1915, served as M.O. 6th Reserve Hospital, Uskub, with Serbian Relief Unit. 
From March to October, 1916, was M.O. Hopital Auxiliaire, 301, Asnieres-sur-Oise; 
then attached to R.A.M.C. till July, 1919, as Bacteriologist 63rd General Hospital, Malta and Salonika, 
and later to 82nd at Constantinople. 
Demobilised in London, returning to Australia in 1923. 
Early education at Sydney Girls'' High School.







DALYELL Miss Elsie Jean, Bacteriologist Royaumont 2-May-16 2-Oct-16 



Medal card of Dalyell, Elsie J  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue

Dr Elsie Dalyell - Bacteriologist Royaumont 2-May-16 2-Oct-16

Scottish Hospital - A to Z personnel entry  



For Dauntless France Entry

Photos sourced from
picture no.1
https://www.flickr.com/photos/state-records-nsw/7653427712/

picture no. 2

http://scottishwomenshospitals.co.uk/img/500.jpg


Following information is from RAMC Service details in Malta 

Dr Elsie Jean Dalyell 
OBE (1919) MB BS (Sydney 1909)
13 Dec 1881 [Newtown Sydney] – 1 Nov 1948 [Greenwich NSW Australia]

1897 Pupil-teacher (Department of Public Instruction).

1909 Entered the Women's College and graduated MB with First Class Honours and ChM in 1910.

1911–1912 Female resident medical officer at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. In 1911–12, Elsie Dalyell was the first woman on the full-time medical school staff as demonstrator in pathology. In December 1912 she became the first Australian woman elected to a Beit Fellowship for medical research, which she took up at the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine, London.1

Mar 1915–Apr 1915 Joined Lady Wimborne's Serbian Relief Fund unit which went to Skopje (Uskub), to help with the typhus epidemic. Worked as a bacteriologist at the Sixth Reserve Hospital, under Dr T Gwynne Maitland, director of the Typhus Colony Skopje, Serbia.3

The Serbian Relief Fund (SRF) maintained in Serbia five complete Hospital Units: Lady Paget's, Cornelia Lady Wimborne's, Mrs Stobart's, and the First and Second British Farmer's Hospitals. The last three were mobile units, specially organised and equipped to deal with either wounded soldiers or infectious diseases, like typhus. In addition, the SRF sent nurses to Mrs Hardy's Hospital at Kragujevatz, and a contingent of nurses to the typhus colony formed by Lady Paget at Skopje.

1 Nov 1916 Attached to the Royal Army Medical Corps. In the spring of 1916, Miss Louisa Aldrich-Blake, Surgeon at the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital and Dean of the London School of Medicine for Women, approached all the women on the Medical Register. From replies received, eighty women were sent to hospitals in Malta, Egypt, or Salonika in August and September 1916. In October 1916, on hearing from the War Office that fifty more Lady Doctors were needed for service with the RAMC in English hospitals, Aldrich-Blake again negotiated with all the women who had qualified in the preceding ten years, and secured the requisite number in a very short time6. The women doctors were not given rank, grading, uniforms, or even the ration and billeting allowance that every male doctor had of right.5

1916 Joined the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service unit at Royaumont, France, and afterwards obtained a short term contract with the War Office and was attached with the RAMC at Malta.

Malta 20 Oct 1916 Embarked for Malta as part of the Women's Medical Unit RAMC.
The casualties from operations in Gallipoli (25 Apr 1915–9 Jan 1916), and Salonika (Oct 1915–30 Sept 1918), were initially treated at Malta and Egypt, but in 1917, submarine attacks on hospital ships made it unsafe to evacuate from Salonika, and five General Hospitals, the 61st, 62nd, 63rd, 64th and 65th, mobilised in Malta for service in Salonika.1

The number of sick and wounded treated in Malta from May 1915 up to February 1919 was: 2,538 officers, 14 nursing sisters, and 55,439 other ranks, a total of 57,991 from the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, and 2,930 officers, 467 nursing sisters, and 74,733 other ranks, a total of 78,130, from the Salonika Expeditionary Force.

In June 1916, the medical personnel in Malta consisted of 165 medical officers, 403 nurses and 1,827 other ranks. In August 1916, however, 48 women doctors were sent to Malta, and another reinforcement of women doctors arrived in November 1916, bringing the total number of women doctors employed in Malta during the Gallipoli and Salonika campaigns to eighty-two.

The Lady Doctors, also referred to as the Lady Medical Officers or Lady Doctors, were distributed amongst the military hospitals that opened in Malta, but were mainly based at St David's Hospital, St Andrew's Hospital, St George's Hospital, and the Valletta Military Hospital.

Malta 1 June 1917 Embarked for Salonika.

1 June 1917–1 July 1919 On duty at Salonika.

25 Oct 1917 Mentioned in Dispatches GHQ British Salonika Force (London Gazette 28 Nov 1917).

5 June 1919 Mentioned in Dispatches (London Gazette 5 June 1919).
Awarded the Order of the British Empire (Military Division).

1 July 1919 Arrived in England, contract expired.

1919–1922 In 1919, the Accessory Food Factors Committee appointed jointly by the Medical Research Council and the Lister Institute, commissioned a small team led by Dr (Dame) Harriette Chick, and including Dr E J Dalyell, to investigate whether the diseases affecting the population in Vienna were the result of vitamin deficiencies in the diet. The team studied the role of vitamin D in preventing infantile rickets.2

Mar 1923 Returned to Australia, where without capital, her attempts to set herself in private practice in Macquarie Street, the Harley Street of Sydney, failed.

Jan 1924 Assistant microbiologist in the Department of Public Health.

1925–1935 Served on the committee of the Rachel Forster Hospital for Women and Children, and with Dr Maisie Hamilton, was responsible for the venereal diseases clinic which opened there in 1927.
(The Rachel Forster Hospital, Sydney, was founded in the aftermath of the First World War. It was staffed exclusively by women).

1 Nov 1948 Died at her home at Seaman Street, Greenwich, New South Wales Australia, of hypertensive arterial disease and coronary occlusion.


RAMC Dr Elsie Jean Dalyell from Sydney
Malta 20 Oct 1916 Embarked in the Hospital Ship Britannic for Malta and Egypt, via Naples and transshipping at Mudros.
Malta 1 June 1917 Embarked for Salonica as a bacteriologist with No 63 General Hospital.

service bio athttp://www.maltaramc.com/ladydoc/d/dalyellej.html#1916


  

MARY CLEMENTINA DE GARIS

(1881-1963)
medical practitioner, obstetrician

Medal card of De Garis, Mary C  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross Doctor
Biography Entry
In 1907 she became the second woman in Victoria to take out an M.D. On the death of her fiancé in World War I, she served for fifteen months as head of the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service attached to the Serbian Army and was decorated by the Serbian government.

Graduated with high honours in Medicine from Melbourne University.
Sailed with  Australian Red Cross in 1916 to England, served in the Manor War Hospital, Epsom, before going with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals to Serbia. She served with such distinction that she was awarded the Order of St Sava, Serbia, III Class.
 


Served in
  • Scottish Women's Hospitals
  • French Red Cross
 
 
 

De GARIS Dr Mary Clementina, Chief Medical Officer America Unit 27-Feb-17 30-Sep-18 
 
British Army     French Red Cross    Doctor

Medal card of De Garis, Mary C  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
 
Dr Mary Clementina De Garis - Chief Medical Officer America Unit 27-Feb-17 30-Sep-18







ANNIE GRANGE FERGUS



RAMC Annie Grange Fergus from New Zealand

18 Oct 1916 Ordered to embark in the Hospital Ship Britannic on 20 October for Malta and Egypt, via Naples and trans-shipping at Mudros.
On duty at St David's Military Hospital, which opened on 25 July 1915 with 464 beds. St David's Hospital closed on 1 May 1917, when it mobilized as No 62 General Hospital with the British Salonica Force.

2 July 1917 Dr Annie Grange Fergus embarked at the Custom House Valletta on HMT ship Abbassieh with the staff of No 62 General Hospital.

4 July 1917 HMT ship Abbassieh sailed out of the Grand Harbour. She was escorted by HMS Aster and HMS Azalea. HMS Aster struck a mine and sunk eleven miles off Malta with the loss of ten lives. HMS Azalea also struck a mine as she went to the aid of the stricken ship. The transports returned to Malta and anchored in Marsaxlokk Harbour.
64 GH Salonica
Aerial view of No 64 British General Hospital Salonica (Cotter collection AMS Archives)

6 July 1917 HMT Ship Abbassieh sailed out of Marsaxlokk Harbour. She arrived at Suda Bay Crete on 9 July and in Salonica, (Thessalonika) Harbour, on 11 July. The medical women were transferred to the H.S. Llandovery Castle, while the men marched to Karaissi Rest Camp. No 62 General Hospital was erected in Uchantar Convalescent Camp to the east of No 61 General Hospital. The site was about 12 km from Salonica and a mile east of the Monastir road.

21 July 1917 Eight medical women who had been transferred to H.S. Llandovery Castle reported for duty.

6 Nov 1917 Closure of No 62 General Hospital. The medical women were transferred to other hospitals.
No 62 General Hospital left Salonica for Taranto, Italy.
Dr Annie Grange Fergus renewed her contract with the RAMC for another 12 months.

6 Mar 1918 Returned to England. An adverse report was received on her from Salonica. She was granted an interview on her arrival to England and was posted to Eastern Command, which was to report on her work and conduct after two months service within that command. She asked for, but was refused an overseas posting.

18 Mar 1918 – 20 Oct 1918 On duty with Eastern Command.
Malta 14 Nov 1918 Granted a new contract and embarked for Malta.
Malta 28 Feb 1919 On duty at the General Military Hospital Colchester, (Southern Command).

6 May 1919 Demobilized.

service Bio athttp://www.maltaramc.com/ladydoc/f/fergusag.html#1916


Laura E. FORSTER

DR LAURA E FORSTER

Born in 1858 at Ryde, NSW – daughter of William Forster & Eliza Jane Wall. William was a member of the NSW Parliament, and Premier for a short time 1859 / 60

Death - British Nursing journal gives it as 
January 29th 1917 and Australian news article and Medical Women at War give it as February 11th 1917, at Zaleshchiki, in Galicia

Educated in Sydney
Medical degree in Berne, Switzerland
Served as a nurse in the Balkan War
Joined the British Field Hospital, Antwerp in Sept 1914
Was severing with Millicent Fawcett Hospital Units in Russia at time of her death

British Medal card for Laura:
British Field Hospital for Belgium – Surgeon
French Red Cross – Doctor


“Soon after the outbreak of the war Dr Forster joined the staff of the Belgian Field Hospital, which was in Antwerp. At the time of the bombardment they had to leave at very short notice, the wounded being removed in motor buses. They traveled at night time without lights by a circuitous route to Ghent, which again they had to evacuate hurriedly and move on to Ostend, where the wounded were taken on board a steamer and conveyed safely to England. After this trying experience Dr Forster decided to go to Russia, where for several months she was doing surgical work in the largest hospital in Petrograd. Thence she went on to the Caucasus, doing surgical work for the Russian Red Cross, and later on she reached Erzerum, where for a time she was in charge of a hospital. Finally she returned to Russia and took charge of a hospital at Zaleshchiki.” [SMH 16/5/17]

Laura died on the 11th February 1917 at Zaleshchiki in Galicia from heart failure after an attack of influenza.


1916 Group photograph of doctors, nursing sisters and Russian soldiers at Zaleschiki, Galicia.
AWM Photo H18592


Zaleschiki, Galicia. A group of British Nurses and other medical personnel outside a small hospital.
AWM Photo H18586

Forster, Laura (1858–1917)
from Sydney Morning Herald
16 May 1917, p 7

News has been received in Sydney of the death on February 11, at Zaleshchiki, in Galicia, of Dr. Laura Forster, daughter of the late Mr. William Forster, who was a member of the New South Wales Parliament from 1856 to 1880, holding the office of Premier from October, 1850, to March, 1860, and subsequently various portfolios. Dr. Forster's death is stated to be due to heart failure after an attack of influenza. She was educated in Sydney, and took her medical degrees at Berne, Switzerland. Her brother, Mr. C. E. Forster, resides at Point Piper, Sydney, and her aunt, Miss Forster, at Darling Point; and Mrs. Kater, wife of Mr. H. E. Kater, M.L.C., is a sister.

Soon after the outbreak of the war Dr. Forster joined the staff of the Belgian Field Hospital, which was in Antwerp. At the time of the bombardment they had to leave at very short notice, the wounded being removed in motor buses. They travelled at night time without lights by a circuitous route to Ghent, which again they had to evacuate hurriedly and move on to Ostend, where the wounded were taken on board a steamer and conveyed safely to England. After this trying experience Dr. Forster decided to go to Russia, where for several months she was doing surgical work in the largest hospital in Petrograd. Thence she went on to the Caucasus, doing surgical work tor the Russian Red Cross, and later on she reached Erzerum, where for a time she was in charge of a hospital. Finally she returned to Russia and took charge of a hospital at Zaleshchiki
.


Newspapers articles

  • is at the front with a British field hospital, West Australian, 23 November 1914, p 6                                         Dr. Laura Forster, sister of Mr. W. T. Forster, barrister, of Perth, and youngest daughter of the late William Forster, of Sydney, is now at the front in the British field hospital with an ambulance corps. The members of the statff are voluntary workers, and the outfit was purchased with money collected for the purpose in London. There are also at the front with their regiments two half-brothers of Mr. W. T. Forster (Captains Cyril Forster and Lionel Forster. A nephew (Stanley Forster) has started with the Australian troops for the war.

  • The British Nursing Journal  Volume 58, 20th January 1917 (p50)                                                                     ... doctor, on a tributary of the Volga, where Dr. Alice Benham treated not only refugees, but peasants of many races and creeds, who crowded in daily from the surrounding districts. When she had t o give up her voluntary service in September, Dr. Laura Forster took over the hospital, and she will carry it on until Russian medical help is available. Dr. Mabel May is also conducting'a similar, though larger, hospital in a remote and untended district, and with Dr. Muriel Kerr, is looking after 40 in... 

  • The British Nursing Journal  Volume 59, 27th October 1917 (p269)                                                            We are indebted t o Miss Eileen Cordner for the information that the funeral in Russia depicted in this journal last week was that of a medical woman, not a trained nurse. She writes that Dr. Forster, who contracted influenza and died from heart failure after a week`s illness, had undoubtedly overtaxed her strength. She was in the retreat from Antwerp, then went to Russia where she worked in Russian hospitals in Petrogtad, for over a year. She helped for a short time in a maternity barak in that city, then went with a Russian unit to the Caucasus. After this, she definitely joined the N.U.W.S.S. units working for some months in a large district beyond the Volga ; at the end of December, she took up work at Zaleschilry and died on January 29th, Miss Cordner writes :-“ She was beloved by all of us nurses, who had the good fortune to work under her.



References

Medical Women at War 1914 - 1918 - Pages 168 & 169 
https://www.deepdyve.com/lp/pubmed-central/medical-women-at-war-1914-1918-jvPseJhBDH/9

Great War Forum - Entry by Frev on Dr Laura E. Forster
http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=145018

The forgotten Australian women doctors of the Great War by Heather Sheard
http://theconversation.com/the-forgotten-australian-women-doctors-of-the-great-war-38289

'Forster, Laura (1858–1917)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/forster-laura-17879/text29468, accessed 20 March 2015.
http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/forster-laura-17879



LUCY EDITH GULLETT,

Dr Lucy Gullett
(1876-1949), medical practitioner
Biography Entry
Medal card of Gullett, Lucy E WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross
During 1915-16 she went at her own expense to Europe and served in a French Red Cross military hospital at Lyons. In 1919 during the influenza epidemic she was medical officer at the City Road emergency hospital, Sydney.
Served in

  • French Red Cross

M.B., Ch.M. : Surgeon, French Red Cross, France. 
Attached to Hopital d''Ulster, Lyons, 1915-16. 
Early education at Sydney Girls'' High School.


British Army    French Red Cross    Driver


For Dauntless France Entry





LAURA MARGARET (Fowler) HOPE

 
(1868-1952), medical practitioner

Biography Entry
Medal card of Hope, Laura  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross  Doctor
In 1915 the Laura & Husband Charles  joined the Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service and were sent to Serbia where Laura directed a unit that treated wounded soldiers. Captured in November, they were transported to Hungary by cattle truck and imprisoned for two months. They eventually reached England in 1916, recuperated, and resumed work in Kalimpong. Laura and Charles were each awarded the Serbian Samaritan Cross in 1918
 Served in
        • Scottish Women's Hospitals
        • French Red Cross
 
 Dr Laura Hope in her Scottish Women's Hospital uniform, grey with a Gordon tartan rosette on the bonnet
 
 
 

A to Z of personnel Scottish Women's Hospital entry 

HOPE Mrs Laura, Doctor Kraguievatz 12-Sep-15 12-Feb-16 



British Army    French Red Cross    Doctor

Medal card of Hope, Laura  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue

Dr Laura Margaret (Fowler) Hope   Doctor Kraguievatz 12-Sep-15 12-Feb-16 





ELIZABETH BRITOMARTE JAMES,

(1867–1943), administrator

Biography Entry
Medal card of James, Elizabeth B  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps  Unit Administrator
During World War I Mrs James joined her two sons Cecil and George, who had enlisted in England. In London she worked as a journalist before qualifying as an administrator in Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps. Drafted to Nottingham in charge of field cookery, she later commanded No.1 Unit of the Q.M.A.A.C. in France. She returned to Australia with her invalided sons and founded the Imperial Ex-service Women's Association.
 
 Served in
  •  Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps / Women's Auxiliary Army Corps
 

 IWM - Lives of the First World war - Entry
British Army    Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps    Unit Administrator



ELAINE MARJORY LITTLE,

 
(1884-1974), pathologist

Biography Entry

Served in
Royal Army Medical Corps
rank - Captain 
        • graduating in 1915 from  Sydney University
        • After some difficulty she managed to get a passage to London, and on arrival, offered her services to the War Office. She was posted to the Lister Institute, where she met Harriet Chick, who told her that Sir Charles Martin, the director of the Institute was in France and needed bacteriologists. Within a week a letter marked secret in large letters arrived at Marjory’s flat. She used to tell how she sat and stared at it for several minutes before opening it. It was an order to report to Sir Charles at his hospital laboratory in Rouen. 
  • She worked for a short time at Rouen, and was then put in charge of the laboratory at the No.46 Stationary Hospital of the British Expeditionary Force at Etaples with the rank of captain.  

  • Her commanding officer at Etaples, Colonel Cummins, wrote to Sir Charles commending her work and dedication in ‘one of the most important of our laboratories’. He praised a paper she had written in collaboration with a Miss Williams, on the pathology of influenza. He said that she had done splendid work, and as well as doing her own work, and that from other hospitals in the area, she had carried out all the venereal disease tests, ‘which she might well have refused to do’. Dr Scot Skirving recalled visiting her one night in her cold, dark laboratory, ‘My word’, he said, ‘I took off my hat to that girl’. 

Marjory served with the RAMC in 1918 and 1919, and after demobilisation returned to Sydney to work with Professor Welsh at Sydney University.
B.Sc., M.B., F.R.A.C.P. : Captain, R.A.M.C., B.E.F., France. 
Enlisting in London in May, 1918, served as Pathologist, No. 25 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, 
and later in charge of Laboratory, No. 46 Stationary Hospital, Etaples, 
returning to Australia in January, 1920. 
Demonstrator in Pathology and Science Research Scholar.







ISABEL ORMISTON

(Martha Isabel Ormiston)

Biography Entry
Medal card of Ormiston, Isabel  WO 372/23links to the Catalogue
French Red Cross Doctor
Served in
        • Red Cross in London
        • French Red Cross
        • the Queen of the Belgians' Hospital at Ostend and La Panne (1914-1915)
        • Wounded Allies' Relief (W.A.R.) Hospital Montenegro (1916-1917)
        •  W.A.R. Hospital, Limoges

 

 Dr Isabel Ormiston on her marriage to Major (Maj) Chudleigh Garvice DSO, Commandant of the Alexandria Police. Maj Garvice received his DSO while serving with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers during the Boer War. In 1920 he married Dr Martha Isabel Ormiston, a Tasmanian born doctor who graduated from the University of Sydney. Maj Chudleigh died within a year of their marriage. Dr Ormiston had been working with the  before enlisting and was attached to the Queen of the Belgians' Hospital at Ostend and La Panne (1914-1915), Wounded Allies' Relief (W.A.R.) Hospital Montenegro (1916-1917), 

and W.A.R. Hospital, Limoges. She was awarded the Montenegrin Red Cross and Orders of Danilo and the Nile. She later took up the position of Senior Lady Medical Officer, Egyptian Ministry of Education and in 1928 was awarded an MBE. She died in July 1958 in Australia.

  IWM - Lives of the First World war - Entry

British Army    French Red Cross    Doctor

AWM Photo P09660.002
(no Photo online) 
Description: 
Studio portrait of bride Dr Isabel Ormiston on her marriage to Major (Maj) Chudleigh Garvice DSO, Commandant of the Alexandria Police. Maj Garvice received his DSO while serving with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers during the Boer War. In 1920 he married Dr Martha Isabel Ormiston, a Tasmanian born doctor who graduated from the University of Sydney. Maj Chudleigh died within a year of their marriage. Dr Ormiston had been working with the Red Cross in London before enlisting and was attached to the Queen of the Belgians' Hospital at Ostend and La Panne (1914-1915), Wounded Allies' Relief (W.A.R.) Hospital Montenegro (1916-1917), British Red Cross Depot Egypt (1916) and W.A.R. Hospital, Limoges. She was awarded the Montenegrin Red Cross and Orders of Danilo and the Nile. She later took up the position of Senior Lady Medical Officer, Egyptian Ministry of Education and in 1928 was awarded an MBE. She died in July 1958 in Australia.

Photo sourced from 
Picture Queensland Connections - Martha Isabel Ormiston (#182859)
http://bishop.slq.qld.gov.au/webclient/DeliveryManager?pid=182860&custom_att_3=NLA


MARTHA ISABEL GARVICE

M.B. : Medical Officer, Red Cross—French Section—France, Salonika and Egypt. 
Joining in London in August, 1914, served with the Queen of the Belgians'' Hospital at Ostend and La Panne, 1914-15, 
Wounded Allies'' Relief Hospital, Montenegro, 1915-16, 
British Red Cross Convalescent Depot, Egypt, 1916, 
and W.A.R. Hospital, Limoges, 1917. 
Awarded Montenegrin Red Cross and Orders of Danilo and the Nile. 
Early education at Riverina Grammar School, Albury.



AWM Photo P09660.002
(no Photo online) 
Description: 
Studio portrait of bride Dr Isabel Ormiston on her marriage to Major (Maj) Chudleigh Garvice DSO, Commandant of the Alexandria Police. Maj Garvice received his DSO while serving with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers during the Boer War. In 1920 he married Dr Martha Isabel Ormiston, a Tasmanian born doctor who graduated from the University of Sydney. Maj Chudleigh died within a year of their marriage. Dr Ormiston had been working with the Red Cross in London before enlisting and was attached to the Queen of the Belgians' Hospital at Ostend and La Panne (1914-1915), Wounded Allies' Relief (W.A.R.) Hospital Montenegro (1916-1917), British Red Cross Depot Egypt (1916) and W.A.R. Hospital, Limoges. She was awarded the Montenegrin Red Cross and Orders of Danilo and the Nile. She later took up the position of Senior Lady Medical Officer, Egyptian Ministry of Education and in 1928 was awarded an MBE. She died in July 1958 in Australia.






MABEL MURRAY-PRIOR

  • Doctor 
  • Voluntary Aid Detachment 

 L., L.M., R.C.P. and R.C.S. (Irel.), Med. V : Doctor and V.A.D., Hospitals, England and Scotland. 

Being at Hong Kong at the outbreak of War, proceeded to England in 1915 and worked for a time in a hospital as a V.A.D. Then completing medical course at Dublin, served at Royal Herbert Hospital, Woolwich, for six months and later at Edinburgh Hospital till some months after the Armistice. 

Early education at Ascham School.

 

 

  

 



The University of Sydney - BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE ENTRY







HANNAH MARY HELEN SEXTON

(1862-1950), surgeon
Biography Entry
After touring Europe in 1912-14, she offered her services to the Australian authorities on the outbreak of World War I. She was refused, and instead joined several other women in starting a field hospital of twenty-five beds at Auteuil in France. Dr Helen Sexton, one of a group of seven women who were the first medical students at the University of Melbourne in 1887, took a small field hospital to France, financing it herself with the help of other women doctors. The hospital was known as Helen Sexton’s Hopital Australian and operated in Paris in 1915 and 1916. Helen was given the rank of Majeur in the French Army and worked for a short while at the Val-de-Grace Military Hospital in Paris when the work of her own hospital was completed. Sexton returned to Melbourne in 1917 and settled at Toorak
Served in
  • French Red Cross



    Medical practitioner

    Helen Sexton was one of the group of seven women who formed the first cohort of women medical students who studied medicine at the University of Melbourne from 1887.

    She graduated in 1892 and subsequently was closely involved in the establishment of the Victorian Medical Women's Society and the (Queen) Victoria Hospital.


    After graduating in medicine, Helen Sexton was soon active in promoting the legitimacy of women medical practitioners. In 1895 she was one of those present at the foundation meeting of the Victorian Medical Women's Society. The following year she was one of ten women doctors who met to discuss the establishment of a hospital staffed by women and attended by women in Melbourne. It was called the Victoria Hospital, named for the state of Victoria and conveying the idea that it was open to all Victorian women, regardless of their circumstances. The following year the hospital was re-named the Queen Victoria Hospital to commemorate the diamond jubilee of Queen Victoria. Helen Sexton was in charge of an operating theatre.

    She worked at the hospital until 1910 and two years later went to Europe. Soon after the outbreak of World War I she took a small field hospital to France, serving in the French Army with the rank of Major.

    She returned to Australia in 1917 and in 1919 sailed for England where she subsequently retired from medical practice.

    Events

    1896 One of the first two women resident medical officers at the Melbourne Hospital


 

 


References:


Croix-Rouge Française  / French Red Cross 
Website http://www.croix-rouge.fr/La-Croix-Rouge/La-Croix-Rouge-francaise/Historique/Premiere-Guerre-mondiale#

Service Medals Details
French Red Cross / LA CROIX-ROUGE FRANÇAISE List of Red Cross nurses decorated in 14 -18 (VND.MS-EXCEL, 601 KB)The French Red Cross publishes this exclusive document archives of the First World War, in honor of the volunteer nurses who took part in the conflict.


For Dauntless France ( online Book ) 

an account of Britain's aid to the French wounded and victims of the war compiled for the British Red Cross Societies and the British Committee of the French Red Cross by Laurence Binyon, with preface by His Excellency Paul Cambon and with illustrations by Edmund Dulac, A. N. Cotterell, Mrs. Wilfrid De Glehn, Herbert Ward, and William Rothenstein. Published 1918 by Hodder and Stoughton in London, New York.                                                                                                                                                                https://archive.org/stream/fordauntlessfran00biny#page/n7/mode/2up