AANS - Hospitals units




AANS - Units in which they served in

Unit

( clicking on the link will open the units list of names)

Number Of AANS Nurses In It

Australian Army Nursing Service

359

Nurses (July 1915 - Nov 1918)

471

Nurses (July 1915 - November 1918)

2

Nurses (July 1915 - November 1918)

348

Nursing Staff

40

Convalescent Depot, Harefield Park, London

56

No 1 Australian General Hospital

142

First Australian General Hospital, Special Reinforcements

45

Australian General Hospital 2, Nursing Service

50

3rd Australian General Hospital

73

No 3 Australian General Hospital

8

14th Australian General Hospital

38

Hospital Transport Corps

67

Sea Transport Staff Section 1

12

AMC Sea Transport Staff, Section 4

8

Missing unit name for code: MED26.104.4SECT5

10

No 6 Section, Sea Transport Staff

12

Sea Transport Staff Sections 7-8

10

Australian Army Medical Corps, Hospital Transports Staff (No. 1 Hospital Ship, 'Karoola')

9

Total

1760

 
There is more info and pictures below on some of these units
 
 
 
 
More information about the units can be found in the
or in
Official History of the Australian Army Medical Services, 1914–1918 - Volume Vol3
 

Australian WW1 hospitals

 

General Hospitals

These were large base hospitals with 250, 500 or 1000 beds. They also generally administered a number of auxiliary hospitals. The 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 10th and 14th served overseas; the others were based in Australia. The 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 14th were all eventually upgraded to the maximum size.


 

1st Australian General Hospital (1 AGH) 

Formed Queensland, August 1914. Departed Brisbane aboard Kyarra 21 November 1914. (Egypt, Western Front)
  • 1 AGH Egypt This hospital was located in various buildings in Cairo. It dealt with all war cases—physical injuries, diseases, shell shock.

  • 1 AGH Rouen, France This hospital dealt with general battle casualties.

 
 
 
 More information about this unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE

 
187 Nurses were listed in this unit


    E03692

    2nd Australian General Hospital (2 AGH) 

    Formed New South Wales August 1914. Departed Sydney aboard Kyarra 28 November 1914. (Egypt, Western Front)
    • 2 AGH Boulogne, France This was a large tented hospital, and most of the patients were battle casualties. It came to specialise in the treatment of fractures. This hospital experienced many air raids. Towards the end of the war there were outbreaks of influenza. When the armistice was signed, the staff barely found time to celebrate. They were too busy treating the influenza victims who continued to arrive throughout November.

    • For More info about this unit

    More information about this unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE

    50 Nurses were listed in this unit

    Australian General Hospital 2, Nursing Service

    50



    J01654

    3rd Australian General Hospital (3 AGH) 

    Formed New South Wales 1915. Departed Sydney aboard Mooltan 5 May 1915. (England, Gallipoli, Egypt, Western Front)

    No 3 Australian General Hospital (AGH) was on Lemnos 1915

    3 AGH Abbeville, France This hospital operated from tents and huts at Abbeville, in the Somme area of France. For most of its existence (May 1917 to May 1918) it admitted gassed patients and treated them briefly before sending them to other places.

     More information about this unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE


    81 Nurses were listed in this unit



    Australian Imperial Forces (A.I.F.), 1914-1919 - Principal Matron Grace Wilson and 3rd Australian General Hospital nursing sisters, Abbassia, 1916  State Library of New South Wales photo


    10th General Hospital 

    Formed July 1915. Departed Australia 22 July 1915. Arrived in the United Kingdom 29 September 1915. This unit was intended as a 500 bed general hospital for the treatment of Australians in the United Kingdom but owing to a lack of accommodation and poor AIF medical administration, it was broken up at Harefield, England October 1915 and personnel used to staff Auxiliary Hospitals. (England)

    58 Nurses were in this unit - their names have yet to be found

     


    P00036.009

    14th General Hospital 

    Formed 1916. Departed Melbourne 19 August 1916. Was located at Abbassia, Cairo. (Egypt)

     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    38 Nurses were listed in this unit

    14th Australian General Hospital

    38

     
     

    A.A.N.S. IN IMPERIAL UNITS

        
     In February 1917, 111 members of the A.A.N.S. were sent over by the Australian authorities for duty in Imperial units in France. From time to time they were re-inforced, until in May 1917, there were 155 serving in Imperial units, apart from detached members of the Staff of the three General Hospitals.
         At the beginning of June, 1917, a War Office letter was received, requesting that these members on duty in Imperial units might be grouped together in three British units, working under Matrons of their own service. It was decided therefore to hand over:

    No.25 General Hospital 

    requiring staff of 100

    No.5 Stationary Hospital 

    requiring staff of 20

    No.38 Stationary Hospital 

    requiring staff of 35

         The Matron-in-Chief A.I.F. was asked to suggest the grouping of members, and to nominate the Matrons. The Matrons chosen were:-

    No.25 General Hospital, Hardelot. Matron A. M. Kellett who took over on 10.7.17.
    No.5 Stationary Hospital, Dieppe. Matron J. Miles Walker, who took over on 11.7.17.
    No.38 Stationary Hospital, Calais. Matron E.S. Davidson – opened on 14.7.17.
    More information can be found in the
    OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE

      
     
     

     

    Auxiliary Hospitals

    These were located in rear areas. Generally they were administered by a general hospital. They had no fixed establishments.

    P00173.001

    1st Australian Auxiliary Hospital (1 AAH) 

    Opened 19 January 1915 at Luna Park, Cairo, Egypt. Closed 10 July 1916.
     
    Opened 1916 at Harefield, England. Closed 31 December 1918.
    This hospital contained over 1000 beds for casualties from France. Mostly they were surgical cases and it was possible for special attention to be given to amputees before their return to Australia.
     
     
     
     
     
    Nurses that were listed in this unit

    Convalescent Depot, Harefield Park, London

    56

     

    Above Picture: Heliopolis, Egypt, 1915. Group Portrait Of The Staff Of No. 1 Auxiliary Hospital, 1st Australian General Hospital, Heliopolis. Back Row: Sisters Cook, Scott, Steele. 2nd Row: Sisters Cleland, Nicholson, Staff Nurse (Sn) Katherine Lawrence Porter, Dement, Fitz-Gibbin, Baxter, Hayes, Hunter, Mcclelland, Grewar, Dogherty, Mclean. 3rd Row: Sisters Greenaway, Whiteman, Ellis, Sn Eleanor Dagma Gjedsted, Reid, Collopy, Davies, King, Rose, Doepke, Howard, Mcdonald, Walsh, Guthrie. 4th Row: Sisters Gerrand, Jacobson, Mackay, Instone, Gallin, Brown, White, Rodgers, Hodgson, Huxley, Bowman. 5th Row: Captain Cook, Sister Imlay, Captain Clowes, Sister Langford, Major Brown (Senior Medical Officer), Miss Graham (Matron), Captain Graig, Sister Corwall, Captain Gray. Front Row: Sisters Lightbody, Verey, Miss Ibrahim (Red Cross), Sisters Robinson, Robson, Draper, Tyson, Stafford, Avenell

     
     
     P02402.027Harefield, England. c. 1915. Formal group portrait of the nursing staff of No. 1 Australian Auxiliary Hospital (1AAH) in 1915 or early 1916. Seated in the middle of the front row is Matron Ethel Gray, Australian Army Nursing Service (AANS)
    H19099
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Harefield, England. Two Australian nurses at No 1 Australian Auxiliary Hospital pause during their round.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      
     

    2nd Australian Auxiliary Hospital (2 AAH) 

    This hospital located at Southall, England, specialised in the fitting of artificial limbs.
    Nurses that were listed in this unit - not known yet
     
    C00360

    3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital (3 AAH) 

    This hospital, located in Dartford, England, grew to 1400 beds and was for the treatment of war-related nerves and neuroses.
     
     
    Nurses that were listed in this unit - not known yet
     
     
     
     
     
    Group portrait of unidentified spectators at a sports meeting held by the 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital in the grounds of the Heliopolis Sporting Club. Three of the nursing sisters have cameras. The lighter coloured uniforms worn by all but one of the nurses are their everyday grey uniforms
     
     C04446Dartford, Kent, England. 1917. Group portrait of members of the massage staff at No. 3 Australian Auxiliary Hospital.
     
    Back row, left to right: Miss Lowe, Masseuse; unidentified; Miss Morton, Masseuse; Sergeant Dewar; Miss McRae, Masseuse; Staff Sergeant (S Sgt) Quinn; Miss Rooke, Masseuse; Private Mitchell.
    Second row: S Sgt Beattie; Miss Yates, Masseuse; S Sgt Mackie; Miss Kircaldy, Masseuse; Captain Hugh Murray, Medical Officer in Charge; Mrs unidentified, known as "Mrs Anzac"; S Sgt F. Staweski; Miss Bulmer, Masseuse.
     Front row: Private (Pte) Burnie; Pte Shaw; Pte Lucas.
     



    No.3 Australian Auxiliary Hospital / 3rd Australian Auxiliary Hospital 

    3rd Auxiliary Hospital (2) 
    Opened 9 October 1916 at Dartford, England by 2nd Stationary Hospital. 
    England




    No.4 Australian Auxiliary Hospital / 4th Australian Auxiliary Hospital 

    4th Auxiliary Hospital (2) 
    Opened 16 June 1915 at Moreton Gardens, London, England. 
    Closed 31 January 1919.
    England





    No.5 Australian Auxiliary Hospital / 5th Australian Auxiliary Hospital 

    Opened 16 June 1915 at Digwell House, Wellin, England. 
    Closed 31 January 1919.
    England


    Digswell House
     
     is situated in the Knightsfield area of Welwyn Garden City in the county of Hertfordshire

    1914-1918

    At this time the house was owned by the Aclands who gave over its use during the first World War Digswell House served as the Number 5 Australian Auxiliary Hospital and nursing home for wounded Australian Soldiers though Belgian and British Soldiers also stayed there. 

    It was staffed by the Red Cross from local families. 

    The grounds of Digswell house provided a centre for sports for those soldiers who could compete as can be seen in photographs from this period. A letter published in 1917 sums up the situation at the time.

    The Hon. Mrs. Acland, owner of Digswell House, has generously given up her home to convalescent Australians, the house accommodating about 25 officers. Her husband, Colonel Acland, is at the front, also her only son, Lieut. Acland, with the Grenadier Guards. Her eldest daughter is also nursing in France. Truly a patriotic family! The grounds are very extensive, and include a small lake: Plenty of shooting is available for those able to get about. A batch of Australian officers will be leaving Digswell House next week for Australia, two of whom (shot through the stomach) have some way yet to go for recovery.


    6th Auxiliary Hospital 
    Opened 21 July 1915 at Wellin, England. Closed 30 May1919
    England

     

    7th Auxiliary Hospital (Queensland) 
    Created at Rosemount, Queensland June 1915. Equipped but never opened. Disbanded August 1917.

     

    8th Auxiliary Hospital (Queensland) 
    Opened October 1915 at Old Main Birch Hotel, Southport, Queensland.

     

    9th Auxiliary Hospital (Queensland) 
    Opened 1915 at Staghorn, Southport, Queensland.

     

    10th Auxiliary Hospital (Queensland) 
    Opened 10 April 1915 at Toowoomba, Queensland. Closed 11 November 1916.

     

    11th Auxiliary Hospital (1) (New South Wales) 
    Opened 1915 at Georges Heights, New South Wales. Closed 1916.

     

    11th Auxiliary Hospital (2) (New South Wales) 
    Opened 23 September 1915 at Blackheath, New South Wales as 12th Auxiliary Hospital. Renumbered 11th Auxiliary Hospital 20 April 1916. Closed 17 May 1916.

     

    12th Auxiliary Hospital (New South Wales) 
    Opened Blackheath, New South Wales 23 September 1915. Renumbered 11th Auxiliary Hospital 20 April 1916.

     

    13th Auxiliary Hospital (New South Wales) 
    Opened October 1915 Broughton Hall, Sydney, New South Wales. Specialised in mental cases.

     

    14th Auxiliary Hospital (New South Wales) 
    Opened Glebe, New South Wales.

     

    15th Auxiliary Hospital (Victoria) 
    Opened Preston, Victoria. Closed 26 March 1918.

     

    16th Auxiliary Hospital (Victoria) 
    Opened Royal Park, Victoria. Specialised in mental cases.

     

    17th Auxiliary Hospital (South Australia) 
    Opened Torrens Park, Adelaide, South Australia, 13 January 1916. Closed 31 December 1916. Move to North Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 17 May 1918, swapping places with 18th General Hospital.

     

    18th Auxiliary Hospital (South Australia) 
    Opened 21 September 1915 at Angus College, North Adelaide, South Australia. Closed 31 December 1916.

     

    19th Auxiliary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Opened October 1915 at Artillery Barracks, Fremantle, Western Australia.

     

    20th Auxiliary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Opened Captain Biddle's House, Fremantle, Western Australia.

     

    21st Auxiliary Hospital (1) (Western Australia) 
    Opened Mezies, Mounts Bay Road, Perth, Western Australia.

     

    21st Auxiliary Hospital (2) (New South Wales) 
    Opened 1 November 1917 at George's Heights, Mosman, New South Wales.

     

    22nd Auxiliary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Opened "The Rocks", Albany, Western Australia.

     

    23rd Auxiliary Hospital (Tasmania) 
    Opened 17 April 1918 at Launceston, Tasmania.

     

    24th Auxiliary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Opened 4 April 1918 at Cottlesoe, Western Australia. Specialised in mental cases.

     

    25th Auxiliary Hospital (Tasmania) 
    Opened Hobart Tasmania.

     

    26th Auxiliary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Opened January 1919 in Fremantle, Western Australia.

     

    27th Auxiliary Hospital (Queensland) 
    Opened 1 July 1918 at Rosemount, Queensland.

     

    28th Auxiliary Hospital (New South Wales) 
    Opened 1 May 1919 at Leichhardt, New South Wales. Specialised in mental cases.





    Stationary Hospitals

    These were smaller hospitals, generally based in forward areas.
     

    Marquees and tents being erected to house No 2 Australian Stationary Hospital at Lemnos.

     

    1st Stationary Hospital (South Australia) 
    Formed South Australia August 1914. Departed Adelaide Kyarra November 1914. Renamed 3rd Auxiliary Hospital 9 October 1916. 
    Egypt, Gallipoli, England

     

    2nd Stationary Hospital (Western Australia) 
    Formed Western Australia August 1914. Departed Fremantle Kyarra 4 December 1914. 

    Egypt, Gallipoli, Sinai, Palestine 
     

    No. 2 Australian Stationary Hospital
     
    Originally located at Mena Camp in Egypt, where it was concerned with the treatment of venereal diseases, 2 A.S.H. moved to East Mudros on the island of Lemnos in June 1915.
    Nursing Staff of 25 drawn from No.3 Australian General Hospital & Canadian Stationary Hospitals  
    More information about this unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE





    Casualty Clearing Stations

    These were small hospitals generally located at a railhead or similar transportation hub in forward areas. Their job was to provide emergency treatment and to move casualties back to the stationary and general hospitals.


    No. 1 Australian Casualty Clearing Station

    1st Casualty Clearing Station (Tasmania) 
    Formed Tasmania August 1914. Departed Melbourne Kyarra November 1914. 
    Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front

    History of Unit :

    Nurses
    The following were Sisters-in-Charge …
    Sister M. F. Whipham 25.5.16 to 22.2.17.
    Head Sister H. E. Tait 22.2.17 to 20.7.17.
    Head Sister A. Anderson 20.7.17 to 20.3.18.
    Head Sister E. Fleming 20.3.18 to 19.10.18.
    Head Sister E. M. Menhennet 19.10.18 to 23.2.19.
    SISTERS OF Ist. A.C.C.S. 15/9/1917
    H/Sister ANDERSON, M.
    Sister MOSEY, E.
    RADCLIFF, J.
    GORDON-KING, A.
    MALSTER, L.
    PIDGEON, E.
    CRAGO, B.C.
    S/Nurse CANN, A.S.
    GILLICK, R.
    HUBBARD, M.J.
    McCORMICK, A.
    Nursing Staff of 7, drawn from the staff of No.1 Australian General Hospital
    Source : E. M. McCarthy – Matron-in-Chief, British Troops in France and Flanders, 31.7.19
    Lieut.t-Col. H. S. Stacy, Unofficial history of the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station
    Info From Through These Lines - No. 1 Australian Casualty Clearing Station     
     HOSPITALS: NO. 1 AUSTRALIAN CASUALTY CLEARING STATION

    1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, 3rd Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A69 Warilda 8 February 1916

    1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, 4th Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A18 Wiltshire 7 March 1916

    1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, 5th Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board RMS Orontes 29 March 1916

    Photos of the Unit : on Facebook in the  WW1 Australian and New Zealand Nurses Facebook Group 

     Embarkations - Names ( mostly men ) 


    No. 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station  

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station 
    Formed Melbourne 8 October 1915. Departed Melbourne October 1915. Closed 28 February 1919.
    Egypt, Western Front

    History of Unit :
    Nurses at No.2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station
    No.2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station opened at Trois Arbres near Bailleul, in the 2nd Army on 29.7.16, and was staffed with selected Sisters from No.2 Australian General Hospital with Sister A. B. Pocock A.A.N.S. in charge. Great care was always taken that suitable sisters should be selected for duty in Front Areas, and lists of suitable people were obtained at intervals from Miss Conyers R.R.C. Matron-in-Chief A.I.F. at Headquarters, London.
    The following were Sisters-in-Charge of No.2 Australian C.C.S. until its closing on 2.3.19.
    Sister A. B. Pocock 29.7.16 to 11.4.17.
    Head Sister E. S. Davidson 11.4.17 to 12.7.17.
    Head Sister L. Stobo 12.7.17 to 9.2.18.
    Head Sister C. M. Keyes 9.2.18 to 28.2.19.
    Sisters-in-charge:
    Sister Pocock
    Sister Stobo
    Sister Davidson
    Other Sisters:
    Sister Earle
    Sister Gibson
    Sister Carpenter
    Sister Joliffe
    Sister Sorley (Now Mrs. Garden)
    Sister Porter
    Sister Durham
    Sister Dickson
    Sister Cawood, M.M.
    Sister Peters (Now Mrs. N. Wilkinson)
    Sister Haynes (Now. Mrs. Dooley)
    Sister Derrer (Now. Mrs. )
    Sister Shearer
    Sister Riordan
    Sister Grant [Elsie Grant]
    Sister Tyson [‘Topsy’]
    Also detached to No. 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station:
    Sister Gertrude Doherty [Trois Arbres]
    Sister Alice Ross-King, M.M.
    Sister Ada Smith [photos and accounts of Trois Arbres]
    Nursing Staff of 14 drawn from No. 2 Australian General Hospital
    Source : E. M. McCarthy – Matron-in-Chief, British Troops in France and Flanders, 31.7.19
    Lieut.t-Col. H. S. Stacy, Unofficial history of the 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Station
    Info From Through These Lines - No. 2 Australian Casualty Clearing Station     

    Photos of the Unit : on Facebook in the  WW1 Australian and New Zealand Nurses Facebook Group 
    HOSPITALS: NO. 2 AUSTRALIAN CASUALTY CLEARING STATION

     Embarkations - Names ( mostly men ) 

    Australian Casualty Clearing Station 2

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A40 Ceramic 23 November 1915

    Australian Casualty Clearing Station 2, Reinforcement 1

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A40 Ceramic 23 November 1915

    Australian Casualty Clearing Station 2, Reinforcement 2

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A44 Vestalia 18 January 1916

    Australian Casualty Clearing Station 2, Reinforcement 3

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A69 Warilda 8 February 1916

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A41 Bakara 8 November 1915

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A62 Wandilla 9 November 1915

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A39 Port Macquarie 16 November 1915

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A34 Persic 22 November 1915

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A40 Ceramic 23 November 1915

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A59 Botanist 24 November 1915

    Sydney, New South Wales on board HMAT A45 Bulla 25 November 1915

    Sydney, New South Wales on board HMAT A23 Suffolk 30 November 1915

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 1st Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A40 Ceramic 23 November 1915

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 2nd Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A44 Vestalia 18 January 1916

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 3rd Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A69 Warilda 8 February 1916

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 4th Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A18 Wiltshire 7 March 1916

    2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 5th Reinforcement

    Melbourne, Victoria on board RMS Orontes 29 March 1916

     2nd Casualty Clearing Station, 5th Reinforcement Melbourne, Vic on board RMS Orontes 29 March 1916


    No. 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station 

    3rd Casualty Clearing Station 
    Formed 17 March 1916. Departed Melbourne Medic 20 May 1916 and Sydney Borda 5 June 1916. Closed 26 April 1919.
    Egypt, Western Front

    History of Unit :
    Nurses of No.3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station
    No.3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station opened in the 5th Army in October 1916, and the staff, who had been sent out from England and who had done temporary duty in Abbeville joined, with Sister I. O’Dwyer A.A.N.S. in charge.
    The following were Sisters-in-charge from this time until it closed in May 1919.
    Head Sister I. O’Dwyer Nov. 1916 – 14.11.17.
    Head Sister A. G. Douglas 14.11.17 – 14.5.18.
    Head Sister E. W. Jeffries 14.5.18 – 15.12.18.
    Head Sister V. Woinarski 15.12.18 – May 1919.
    Nurses :
    Annie Bell
    Elsie Grant
    May Tilton
    Nursing Staff of 7 but was increased up to 25 drawn from No.3 Australian General Hospital
    Source : E. M. McCarthy – Matron-in-Chief, British Troops in France and Flanders, 31.7.19
    Info From Through These Lines - No. 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station   

    More information about this unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE


    and from Official Reports given on the Nursing staff of these three Casualty Clearing Stations
     Embarkations - Names ( mostly men ) 

    3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A7 Medic 20 May 1916

     
    3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station

    Melbourne, Victoria on board HMAT A7 Medic 20 May 1916

     


     Photos of the Unit : on Facebook in the  WW1 Australian and New Zealand Nurses Facebook Group 

     HOSPITALS: NO. 3 AUSTRALIAN CASUALTY CLEARING STATION.





    Convalescent and Command Depots

    Convalescent or Command Depots were half way houses for casualties returning to the front - men who no longer required hospitalisation but were not yet fit to rejoin their units. They were also known as "Convalescent Homes".

    Nurses that were listed in this unit

    Convalescent Depot, Harefield Park, London

    56    

     No. 2 Command Depot at Weymouth  11
     
     


    AUSTRALIAN FLYING CORPS HOSPITAL

    Australian Flying Corps Hospital
    Opened at Tetbury when Cottage Hospital, Tetbury taken over by the AIF on 27 October 1918  
    England




    AMBULANCE TRAINS

         In March 1918, three A.A.N.S. sisters were detailed from No.3 Australian General Hospital for duty on an Ambulance Train, in order that they might have experience in this branch of work. Head Sister E. A. Watts was posted in charge, with Staff Nurses E. Smith and A. Darragh. After these sisters had been on the train for 6 months, the staff was changed, and Sister H. Chadwick, No.2 Australian General Hospital was posted in charge, with Staff Nurses M. E. Fuller and E. M. Ellis. This staff remained on the train until March 1919, when they were demobilised.

    found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE
     
     




     

    HOSPITAL SHIPS

    PB0487
    The hospital ship HMHS Karoola (A63) leaving Port Melbourne.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
    Nurses that were listed in this unit

    Hospital Transport Corps

    67

    Sea Transport Staff Section 1

    12

    AMC Sea Transport Staff, Section 4

    8

    Missing unit name for code: MED26.104.4SECT5

    10

    No 6 Section, Sea Transport Staff

    12

    Sea Transport Staff Sections 7-8

    10

    Australian Army Medical Corps, Hospital Transports Staff (No. 1 Hospital Ship, 'Karoola')

    9

     
    A02861

    H.S. KAROOLA

    HMAT Karoola was requisitioned in May 1915 and embarked for Egypt carrying troops and general cargo on June 1915. Following this, she went to England where she was converted to a hospital ship with beds for 463 patients and spent the next three years transporting sick and wounded between England and Australia.
     
     
    More information about H.S. KAROOLA unit can be found in the OFFICIAL REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY NURSING SERVICE IN FRANCE

     
    H15314At Sea. Group photograph of the staff of No 1 Australian Hospital Ship Karoola
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    P05382.014
    Australian nursing sisters wearing life jackets during a drill on board the hospital ship SS Karoola.

    P05768.002

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    AWM P05768.002   Group portrait of medical and nursing staff aboard the Australian Hospital Ship HMHS Karoola. Identified are Sister Pearl Lottie Trayhurn (front row, second from right) and Matron Alice Mary Cooper (front row, third from right). Both nurses enlisted on 12 June 1915, Matron Cooper was awarded the Royal Red Cross Second Class in February 1917 and the Royal Red Cross First Class in April 1920

     
     
     
     

    H.S KANOWNA

     
     
     AWM P03968.001
     Number 2 Australian Hospital Ship (2AHS) Kanowna (A61) with signatures of nurses on the perimeter. Three red crosses are prominently painted on the ship's white sides.
     
     
     
      AWM P02194.012
     Nursing staff of the Hospital Ship Kanowna outside the vessel's smoking room 
     
      

    AWM PB0482
    Twelve nurses from Victoria from the hospital ship HMAT Kanowna (A61).
     
     

    AWM C00540
    Group portrait of 13 unidentified Western Australian nursing sisters aboard the hospital ship Salta, en route from Egypt to France
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     

     H.S. GUILDFORD CASTLE

    The following members of the A.A.N S. were attached for duty on the H.S. Guildford Castle on July 5th, 1915.

    Sisters  - V. Woinarski, M. Brown, A. King, E. Vierk, C. Sorensen;

    Staff Nurses -  Z. Lyons, B. Loughrey

     

     

     


     Nurses in India

     
     
     
    AWM P04046.001  Group portrait of nursing staff at the Colaba War Hospital, Bombay, which mainly treated patients from the British garrisons in India.
     
    Matron Kathleen Erwood, Australian Army Nursing Service (AANS), is seated in the front row, far left. Matron Erwood also served at the Victoria War Hospital in Bombay, and was later transferred to the British 42nd General Hospital in Greece in September 1917. After returning to Australia in April 1918, she served with No. 7 Australian General Hospital in Adelaide until her voluntary discharge on 4 April 1920.
     

     Nurses in Salonica
     
     
     
     
     
      AWM C04949  One of the dugouts at the sisters' quarters at the 50th General Hospital at Salonika
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     Reference:

     
    Through These Lines
     
    Australian War Memorial