BABY PROOF PHOTO ALBUM. BABY PROOF

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Baby Proof Photo Album


baby proof photo album
    photo album
  • A photographic album, or photo album, is a collection of photographs, generally in a book. Some albums have compartments which the photos may be slipped into; other albums have heavy paper with a sticky surface covered with clear plastic sheets, in which photos can be put.
  • Photo Album is a compilation DVD released in 2005 that contains all eight of Nickelback's music videos released up to that date. The first seven videos had already been released on the previous DVD The Videos.
  • The Photo Album is the third studio album by indie rock band Death Cab for Cutie, released on October 9, 2001, on Barsuk Records.
    baby proof
  • A childproof object or environment is relatively safe for contact with children. The act of childproofing reduces risks to a level considered acceptable by a society, an institution, or, for example, to specific parents.
baby proof photo album - Heart of
Heart of the Matter
Heart of the Matter
A powerful, provocative novel about marriage and motherhood, love and forgiveness.
Tessa Russo is a stay-at-home mother of two young children and the wife of a renowned pediatric surgeon. Valerie Anderson is an attorney and single mother to six-year-old Charlie—a boy who has never known his father. Although both women live in the same Boston suburb, they are strangers to one another and have little in common, aside from a fierce love for their children. But one night, a tragic accident causes their lives to converge in ways no one could have imagined.
This is the moving, luminous story of good people caught in untenable circumstances. Each being tested in ways they never thought possible. Each questioning everything they once believed. And each ultimately discovering what truly matters most.

Product Description

A powerful, provocative novel about marriage and motherhood, love and forgiveness.
Tessa Russo is a stay-at-home mother of two young children and the wife of a renowned pediatric surgeon. Valerie Anderson is an attorney and single mother to six-year-old Charlie—a boy who has never known his father. Although both women live in the same Boston suburb, they are strangers to one another and have little in common, aside from a fierce love for their children. But one night, a tragic accident causes their lives to converge in ways no one could have imagined.
This is the moving, luminous story of good people caught in untenable circumstances. Each being tested in ways they never thought possible. Each questioning everything they once believed. And each ultimately discovering what truly matters most.



Amazon Exclusive: A Conversation Between Kristin Hannah and Emily Giffin


Emily Giffin (left) is the author of five New York Times bestselling novels, including Something Borrowed, which has been adapted as a major motion picture that will be in theaters in summer 2011. A graduate of Wake Forest University and the University of Virginia School of Law, she lives in Atlanta with her family.
Kristin Hannah (right) is the New York Times bestselling author of eighteen novels, including Night Road. She is a former lawyer turned writer and the mother of one son. She and her husband live in the Pacific Northwest and Hawaii.
Kristin Hannah: Well, first, I have to say, Emily, that I am just the tiniest bit irritated with you. When I got the call to do this interview, I was thrilled, to say the least. It came at a really busy time for me--right after the holidays and we all know how crazy that is--and my work in progress was giving me fits. Then I picked up Heart of the Matter, and lost myself. No more writing, no more cooking, no getting my hair done or reading my email. Once I started the story I literally couldn't put it down. Brava, girlfriend, I say. Your characters are so real and compelling, and they always say exactly the right thing. With so much honest emotion, I just have to ask how much of your work comes from your own life?
Emily Giffin: It never fails to thrill me when someone responds to one of my novels--especially when it's another writer. Writers understand the alchemy involved in making up something from nothing. And I just finished your book, Night Road, and I found it so emotional, so moving, and so terrifying—especially since I have three young children who will someday be teenagers. In terms of how much does my work come from my own life, I would say that I'm absolutely inspired by people, places, conversations, relationships, and issues that I observe, and that the "what if" part of my novel is very much inspired by these things in my life. But the details of my plots and the specifics of my characters come from my own head. How about you, Kristin? I'll ask you the million-dollar question that every author gets asked: where do you get your ideas?
Kristin: Ah, the idea question. I don't want to sound coy, but the truth is, I don't quite know. It's the most magical part of the process for me. I'm a pretty analytical gal, and I approach writing in the same just-the-facts-ma'am way I approach most things. I need to find an issue that engages me on an intellectual level, and then I need to marry that curiosity with a kind of passion. I need to feel genuinely passionate about each story before I ever write a word, and I have to actually have something to say. It takes me at least a year to research and write a novel, and so I have to really adore each part of it—the characters, setting, story. Most of all, it has to make me feel something genuine. That's really the most important component. Usually it begins with a single "what if" question—what if you discovered your mother had a whole secret life about which you knew nothing (Winter Garden) or what if your husband were accused of a crime you believed he hadn't committed (True Colors)—and then I write and re-write until the characters seem as real to me as old friends.
Kristin: I'm amazed by how much we have in common. We're both moms, both lawyers, both lived in London for a time. You're like a younger, cooler version of me. How did you make the transition from lawyer to writer, and do you think you'll ever practice law again?
Emily: I would hardly say I'm cooler than you, Kristin! I hear you live in Hawaii part time! What is cooler than that? I made the transition from lawyer to writer because I was so miserable being a lawyer that I needed some escape from the day-to-day of it. And inventing stories was that escape. I can say, without hesitation, that I will never practice law again. Would you? What kind of law did you practice, and for how long? What did you find appealing (or discouraging) about law? Did you find that it gave you fodder for any of your novels?
Kristin: Honestly, I have met very few lawyers who don't say that what they really want to do is write. Like you, I can say with certainty that I will never practice law again. Not that anyone would want me to. But I still keep my Bar membership up…just in case this whole writing thing doesn't work out. And yes, in the past few years, I have finally begun to put some of that law school education to work for me. I find that I'm really enjoying adding legal issues to my work. Of course, I have to talk to real lawyers to make sure I'm getting it right...
Read more of the conversation between Emily Giffin and Kristin Hannah

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Lunar Eclipse Timelapse
Lunar Eclipse Timelapse
I love the way that sounds. But I think this video clip can hardly go for a real timelapse . It's lack of foreground strips the authenticity of it and looks as if I've animated a still-photo across the frame. The only little proof of authenticity I have is the flicker caused by nearby cars. I didn't have any time to do anything proper, I ran outside my house at 7:50 this morning and only had a few minutes to spare - my little baby girl needed taking care of. In a perfect world I would have had a telescope-tracking dolly prepared with a much, much longer lens, and a few hours to spare. But as usual, music makes all the difference in the world. The sound is from Biosphere's Substrata - one of my top-ten most favourite ambient albums of all time (yes, I have a top-ten of ambient albums). It's also the first ever internet purchase I've ever made -back in 1997, even Amazon.com was in it's infancy back then. Video was shot with the Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 2/100 ZE, which is, unfortunately for this scenario, the longest lens I have. The first shot of this clip is 1920x1080px crop from the 21-megapixel original, the second clip is uncropped 21megapixels scaled down 65% to fit 1920x1080.
and no one even wanted to have his babies
and no one even wanted to have his babies
Here's the second round of shots from Jenny Lewis & The Watson Twins, Saturday February Fifth at the Angel Orensanz Foundation.

This show. was. incredible. True, I adore Jenny Lewis like she's a gift from heaven (and am waiting for proof that she isn't), but I was not very much a fan of her solo album - until tonight. Theatrics aside, she showcased a vulnerability and musicianship that doesn't come across on the studio version or even on 2004's bootleg from The Echo in L.A.

This is my first time really shooting in RAW, and I think my haphazard editing shows that.

All works distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, see "Additional Information" to the right. Please feel free to use my photos for whatever purpose you see fit, and let me know if you get a second!

baby proof photo album
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