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Tech Deck Blinds


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  • A Fingerboard or Finger-Skateboard is a skateboard complete with moving wheels, graphics and trucks. A fingerboard is 96 millimeters long or longer, and can have a variety of widths like 26mm (regular), 28mm (wide), and 29mm and up (extra wide).
    blinds
  • Confuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand
  • Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily
  • Deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
  • window coverings, especially vertical blinds, wood blinds, roller blinds, pleated blinds
  • The blinds are forced bets posted by players to the left of the dealer button in flop-style poker games. The number of blinds is usually two, but can be one or three.
tech deck blinds - Tech Deck
Tech Deck Skate Shop Bonus Pack Blind (Designs & Colors Vary]
Tech Deck Skate Shop Bonus Pack Blind (Designs & Colors Vary]
One pack includes skate rack, 3 complete fingerboards (each with real metal trucks, grip tape and real skate company graphics). You also get 3 additional decks to mix and match to suit your style, a tool, risers and bolts, and two sticker sheets to customize your boards. Collect them all and build your own Dude Street Crew diorama. With the Tech Deck Skate Shop Bonus Pack, you and your friends will be up and rolling in no time. For ages 9 and up. PLEASE NOTE: the product received may not be the same as pictred, designs and colors vary.

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At a development cost in the neighborhood of $3 million, the GT90 was certainly worthy of pulling styling cues from the original Ford GTs, and although it was never meant for production, it was built according to a Ford press release as a “test bed for technology, engineering and design concepts, and driver-oriented features that eventually may be used in Ford production vehicles.” Officially unveiled to the public in January 1995 at the Detroit Auto Show, the GT90 is finished in bright white with a bright blue and carbon fiber interior. It features a mid engine quad-turbocharged V12 that produces an estimated 720 horsepower and 660 pound-feet of torque. As a result, it had a claimed top speed of 253 mph, which even by today’s standards would make it one of the fastest production cars in the world – faster even than a McLaren F1, which was widely considered the world’s preeminent supercar at the time. Built by a small specialized group over at Ford SVT in just over six months time, the concept’s development timeline was very tight and therefore borrowed components from other vehicles. The team mainly borrowed parts from another supercar that was also way ahead of its time, the Jaguar XJ220. The engine, which was a 48-valve six-liter V12, had to be combined together with four Garrett Systems T2 turbochargers in order to reach its estimated 720 horsepower and was based on the Ford Modular engine. Created by using parts of two Lincoln V8 engines, engineers removed the last pair of cylinders from the rear of one engine and the first pair of cylinders from the front of the other engine. The cut-down engines were then welded together with the final result being a 90-degree V12, which utilized a 90.2 mm bore and a 77.3 mm stroke to achieve maximum power. The GT90 features the FFD-Ricardo five-speed manual gearbox found on the XJ220 and, considering the torque load that it is designed to handle, is noted as having a relatively light shift quality. Also borrowed from the XJ220 comes the all around double wishbone suspension that was designed to enable the car to handle well at top speeds. Using Ford’s new “Edge” design philosophy, the car incorporated advanced technology with a mixture of flat planes, angles, glass and triangular shapes that seemingly all collided together. The GT90 was the first car created using this new styling directive from Ford, which went on to be responsible for the creation of other Ford products like the Ka and Cougar. The effect is most impressive and a wonderfully executed stylistic throwback to its GT40 predecessor, which at once stays true to its heritage but acknowledges the advances in modern design. Taken directly from race car technology, the GT90 body panels are molded out of carbon fiber while the chassis is formed out of a honey-comb sectioned aluminum monocoque. The GT90 is a test bed of advanced technology and design. It sports a tinted, laminated glass bubble over the cockpit and a spoiler that rises off the rear deck at high speeds. According to Ford, it has a “design that tightly enclosed its mechanicals with no wasted space; high tech lighting and blind-spot detection systems; and tiles like those on the space shuttle to shield the V12’s exhaust outlets.” The interior of the car is easily accessed by pushing on a small yellow panel located on the B-pillar that allows the door to swing open. Amazingly for a supercar, it is relatively easy to climb into the cockpit, as the door sill is low and narrow, and the glass which arcs well into the roof is fixed to the door. Reminiscent of an airplane cockpit, the interior is finished in bright blue suede and leather, a carbon fiber center console and custom blue lit gauges. An abundance of brushed and polished aluminum adorns the interior, from the open shift gate and linkage to the controls on the center console, right down to the key for the car. Ford’s engineers included a few other options that were designed for use on the show circuit; the tires were specially made with “GT90” carved directly into the tread, and the doors, as well as all of the lights both inside and out, could easily be opened or turned on via a remote control. After its unveiling in Detroit, the GT90 made its rounds on the Auto Show Circuit in 1995, traveling around the world to Frankfurt and as far away as Tokyo. With few other showings in between, the car recently was shipped over to Europe to be on display in the Ford of Europe 2008 exhibit at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. After returning home, the car was shipped to Alabama where it was on display as part of the Mustang 45th Anniversary Celebration. RM Auction Sale This superb concept car remains in excellent running condition, having been properly stored and maintained over the years in between its show appearances. RM Auctions is proud to publicly offer the GT90 for the first time ever at auction. A remarkable one-off piece of automotive history and cutting-edge design, its offering may ve
Eye of the Beholder
Eye of the Beholder
The inventive Stephan Elliott, helmer of the amusing "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert" as well as "Welcome to Woop Woop," ventures onto thin ice in "Eye of the Beholder," a mixed-genre detective pic, thriller and love story that shifts gears too often and doesn't know when to end. Comely co-stars Ewan McGregor and Ashley Judd are a plus, and a fast-moving story with gadgets, guns and action may be a turn-on for genre fans. But the more serious auds that the film clearly aspires to reach, and occasionally merits, will find all that superfluous in unwinding the complicated threads of an intriguing psychological tale. Based on a novel by Marc Behm (which was followed closely by Claude Miller in his highly stylized 1983 French adaptation with Isabelle Adjani and Michel Serrault, "Mortelle andonnee") about a detective who protects a female serial killer because he believes she is his long-lost daughter, "Eye" takes the major liberty of casting youthful McGregor in the lead role of a British Secret Service agent whose wife has deserted him, vanishing with daughter Lucy. This naturally rules out the idea that the murderess Joanna Eris (Judd) is his missing child. Pic's solution --- and major premise --- that he associates the two because he is simply crackers, hardly carries the same conviction. Armed with the latest high-tech spying gizmos and electronically connected to his office through Hilary (pop star k.d. lang, horsing it up in a snappy Miss Moneypenny sendup), the reclusive Eye, as he is called, receives his assignment from the Chief via computer. He is to follow a politician's son and learn on whom he is spending large sums of money. With all that equipment, the Eye soon finds out it's Joanna in one of her many disguises. Film takes an exciting turn when she suddenly pulls out a knife and makes Swiss cheese of the son in a tense, well-timed scene filmed from the Eye's helpless p.o.v. Before he can phone headquarters for help, he has become mesmerized by the seductive killer, who reminds him so much of his lost little girl. Lucy's pestering voice in his head gives him no peace, urging him to save Joanna. Here pic changes register and becomes a plane-hopping road movie as the Eye, throwing his job to the wind, embarks on an obsessive chase not to capture Joanna but to spy on her. The love story takes over as he banishes little Lucy's voice from his head; due to his spying skill, the object of his desire never notices him. A shot of tattered U.S. flags and the Capitol throws out the red herring that America will become the film's true subject of their coast-to-coast trip, ending in an Alaskan diner called the End of the World. But social commentary is not for the Eye. Adding element on element, Elliott takes the Eye into ever deeper psychological waters. He eavesdrops on Joanna's love affair with a wealthy blind man (a noble Patrick Bergin) and learns how her abandonment by her father is the origin of her psychosis. He visits her stern reform school warden (Genevieve Bujold), who's also in love with the girl, and derails federal police investigations. When he turns his spy camera into a long-range rifle and murders a man out of sheer jealousy, pic reaches a strong psychological climax. Unfortunately, it then plays out three or four more endings of decreasing interest. McGregor, in his first appearance since the "Phantom Menace" megahit, is a long way from planet Earth as the demented intelligence agent, a role that never chooses between James Bond and Hitchcock, or maybe Gene Hackman in "The Conversation." (Pic is decked with salutes to classic movies, some of which, like the glass snowflake balls, are way too obvious.) Sultry-cool Judd starts out as an amusingly acidic film noir stereotype, but the Eye's relentless persecution wears her down until she becomes quite vulnerable and appealing. Jason Priestley has a disagreeable cameo as a macho monster. Guy Dufaux's lensing gives the film the surreal, timeless look Elliott aims for in his script. Marius De Vries' electronic score gets under the skin, while Lizzy Gardiner's time-bending costumes appropriately run a gamut of periods and styles. A Behaviour Worldwide presentation, in association with Village Roadshow and Ambridge Film Partnership, of a Hit & Run/Filmline Intl. production in association with Eye of the Beholder Ltd. (International sales: Behaviour Worldwide, Los Angeles.) Produced by Nicolas Clermont, Tony Smith. Executive producers, Hilary Shor, Mark Damon. Co-producer, Al Clark. Directed, written by Stephan Elliott, based on the novel by Marc Behm. Ewan McGregor... Stephen Wilson Ashley Judd... Joanna Eris Patrick Bergin... Alexander Leonard Genevieve Bujold... Dr. Jeanne Brault k.d. lang... Hilary Jason Priestley... Gary Anne-Marie Brown... Lucy Wilson Kaitlin Brown... Lucy Wilson David Nerman... Micke

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