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Arched Drapery Rods


arched drapery rods
    drapery
  • The artistic arrangement of clothing in sculpture or painting
  • Drapery is a general word referring to cloths or textiles (Old French drap, from Late Latin drappus ). It may refer to cloth used for decorative purposes - such as around windows - or to the trade of retailing cloth, originally mostly for clothing, formerly conducted by drapers.
  • Long curtains of heavy fabric
  • Cloth coverings hanging in loose folds
  • cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
  • curtain: hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
    arched
  • constructed with or in the form of an arch or arches; "an arched passageway"
  • An arch is a structure that spans a space while supporting weight (e.g. a doorway in a stone wall). Arches appeared as early as the 2nd millennium BC in Mesopotamian brick architecture and their systematic use started with the Ancient Romans who were the first to apply the technique to a wide
  • arced: forming or resembling an arch; "an arched ceiling"
  • Form or cause to form the curved shape of an arch
  • Provide (a bridge, building, or part of a building) with an arch
  • Have the curved shape of an arch
    rods
  • A slender straight stick or shoot growing on or cut from a tree or bush
  • (rod) a long thin implement made of metal or wood
  • A thin straight bar, esp. of wood or metal
  • A wand or staff as a symbol of office, authority, or power
  • any rod-shaped bacterium
  • (rod) perch: a linear measure of 16.5 feet
arched drapery rods - Moen CSR2160OWB
Moen CSR2160OWB CSI Curved Shower Rod, Old World Bronze
Moen CSR2160OWB CSI Curved Shower Rod, Old World Bronze
Moen CSR2160OWB Curved Shower Rod Set, Old World BronzeMoen's complete bathroom collections range in style from traditional to modern, encompassing all styles in between. Whether your bath features clean Old World styling or more clean, contemporary decor, Moen has a bathroom collection to suit your tastes.Moen CSR2160OWB Curved Shower Rod Set, Old World Bronze Features:; Adjusts to Fit shower enclosures between 54- and 72-inches; No cutting required; Provides superior strength with no additional hardware needed; Pivoting flanges provide an easy installation on inconsistent or uneven wall surfaces; Provides up to 7.5 additional inches of elbow room in the shower; Decorative covers snap on easily to conceal pivoting flanges and hide holes from previous shower rods; Rod and Covers are Constructed of Stainless Steel and Will Not Rust; Works with standard shower curtains* Creative Specialties International

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Bartholdi Fountain
Bartholdi Fountain
Bartholdi Fountain. Bartholdi is the man who designed the Statue of Liberty in NY harbor. The Bartholdi Fountain The Bartholdi Fountain, designed by the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty, graces the flower-filled Bartholdi Park near the U.S. Botanic Garden and provides a welcome oasis for visitors. The Bartholdi Fountain is based on Classical and Renaissance forms and is an elegant expression of the Gilded Age in which it was created. The Bartholdi Fountain was designed symmetrically in three identical sections. The fountain has a triangular base with turtles and large shells rises to the pedestal, from which three identical nereids (sea nymphs) rise on thirds. Between their feet are fish and scattered sea shells and coral. The nymphs, with arched backs, are caryatids, following a tradition of sculpture founded in classical Greece. They seem to hold up the large fountain basin, which is actually supported by the central column. The nymphs wear headdresses of leaves. Their clinging drapery, clasped by shells at the waist, reveals their supple figures. Despite its monumental size (it weighs approximately 40 tons and is 30 feet high, and the sculptured female figures are 11 feet tall), each element of the fountain is beautifully detailed. The curved arms of the nereids lead the viewer's eye to the large basin above, which supports twelve lights. The fountain continues with three youthful tritons playfully holding out seaweed and is topped by a mural crown resembling a crenelated city wall. Water spills from the crown over the tritons and splashes into the upper basin, while jets shoot from the mouths of the fish and the turtles. Frederic Auguste Bartholdi (1834-1904) created the Bartholdi Fountain for the 1876 International Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. The fountain design was based on a model he had created in 1867. Bartholdi was also working on his design for the Statue of Liberty at the same time. The Bartholdi Fountain, cast in Paris by A. Durenne, was painted to look like bronze and placed at a focal point near the main entrance of the Exhibition grounds in Fairmount Park. At the close of the Exhibition, the Bartholdi Fountain was purchased for $6,000 (half of its estimated value) by the United States government at the suggestion of Frederick Law Olmsted, the famous landscape architect who designed the Capitol Grounds. It was moved to Washington, D.C., in 1877 and placed at the base of Capitol Hill near the center line of the Mall, on what was then the Botanic Garden grounds. When it was created, the fountain fused modern gas-lighting and cast-iron technologies with water and was intended to allegorically represent Light and Water. Bartholdi saw this work as symbolically appropriate for the modern city, and he hoped that many cities throughout the country would purchase castings. Actually only Reims, France, acquired one in 1885, and it is no longer extant. The gas lamps made the fountain a popular attraction since it was one of the first monuments in the city of Washington to be brightly illuminated at night. The lights surrounding the basin were added in 1886, and the round glass globes replaced the original gas fixtures when the fountain was fitted for electric lighting in 1915. During the 1927 relocation of the Botanic Garden, the fountain was dismantled and stored. In 1932, it was re-erected in its present location. The park where the fountain stands was renamed in honor of Frederic Auguste Bartholdi in 1985. The Bartholdi Fountain was restored in 1986. The rusted supporting bolts and rods and the plumbing and wiring were replaced. Dozens of layers of paint were sandblasted from the cast-iron surface, which was then given a new protective coating. The fountain basins were repaired and leveled so that the water now falls evenly. The top coat of paint was renewed in 1996.
Bartholdi's fountain from the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial fair.
Bartholdi's fountain from the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial fair.
The Bartholdi Fountain The fountain was designed symmetrically in three identical sections. The triangular base with turtles and large shells rises to the pedestal, from which three identical nereids (sea nymphs) rise on thirds. Between their feet are fish and scattered sea shells and coral. The nymphs, with arched backs, are caryatids, following a tradition of sculpture founded in classical Greece. They seem to hold up the large basin, which is actually supported by the central column. The nymphs wear headdresses of leaves. Their clinging drapery, clasped by shells at the waist, reveals their supple figures. Despite its monumental size (it weighs approximately 40 tons and is 30 feet high, and the sculptured female figures are 11 feet tall), each element of the fountain is beautifully detailed. The curved arms of the nereids lead the viewer's eye to the large basin above, which supports twelve lights. The fountain continues with three youthful tritons playfully holding out seaweed and is topped by a mural crown resembling a crenelated city wall. Water spills from the crown over the tritons and splashes into the upper basin, while jets shoot from the mouths of the fish and the turtles. Frederic Auguste Bartholdi (1834-1904) created the fountain for the 1876 International Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. The design was based on a model he had created in 1867. Bartholdi was also working on his design for the Statue of Liberty at the same time. The fountain, cast in Paris by A. Durenne, was painted to look like bronze and placed at a focal point near the main entrance of the Exhibition grounds in Fairmount Park. At the close of the Exhibition, the fountain was purchased for $6,000 (half of its estimated value) by the United States government at the suggestion of Frederick Law Olmsted, the famous landscape architect who designed the Capitol Grounds. It was moved to Washington, D.C., in 1877 and placed at the base of Capitol Hill near the center line of the Mall, on what was then the Botanic Garden grounds. When it was created, the fountain fused modern gas-lighting and cast-iron technologies with water and was intended to allegorically represent Light and Water. Bartholdi saw this work as symbolically appropriate for the modern city, and he hoped that many cities throughout the country would purchase castings. Actually only Reims, France, acquired one in 1885, and it is no longer extant. The gas lamps made the fountain a popular attraction since it was one of the first monuments in the city of Washington to be brightly illuminated at night. The lights surrounding the basin were added in 1886, and the round glass globes replaced the original gas fixtures when the fountain was fitted for electric lighting in 1915. During the 1927 relocation of the Botanic Garden, the fountain was dismantled and stored. In 1932, it was re-erected in its present location. The park where the fountain stands was renamed in honor of Frederic Auguste Bartholdi in 1985. The Bartholdi Fountain was restored in 1986. The rusted supporting bolts and rods and the plumbing and wiring were replaced. Dozens of layers of paint were sandblasted from the cast-iron surface, which was then given a new protective coating. The basins were repaired and leveled so that the water now falls evenly. The top coat of paint was renewed in 1996. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Bartholdi Park @ United States Botanic Garden R 8

arched drapery rods
arched drapery rods
5 ft. Curved Shower Rod - Polished Stainless Steel
Unique safety- The curve of the shower rod keeps floors dry by curving in at the corners. The shower curtain stays in the tub keeping water from leaking out. This feature also keeps walls dry and damage free. Unique comfort-The uniquely curved shower rod gives you increased comfort by creating additional elbow room. The curve of the shower rod increases showering space by up to 6". Unique design-The curved shower rod is oval in circumference to prevent spinning. Easy to install. It is simple to install - just three easy steps and you are ready to use the shower. Everything for installation is included; - hardware, mounting brackets & step by step instructions. The Curved Shower Rod features: 5 ft. long oval in circumference sturdy steel rod to fit most standard tub installations (Note- Rod measures 58 1/8 inches at smallest point , however flanges can be moved out an additional 1 inch on each end) Rod may be cut with the hacksaw for shorter enclosures! 2 x matching swivel wall brackets. All mounting hardware included - wood screws, tile anchors, sheetrock anchors, set screws & allen wrench. The rod uses standard length shower curtain. Easy installation!