Eric Cline & Diane Harris Cine- Amarna Social Networks

The Social Network of the Amarna Letters: 

A New Look at International Relations during the Amarna Age


Dr. Eric Cline 
Professor of Classics and Anthropology 
George Washington University

Dr. Diane Harris Cline 
Associate Professor of History and Classics 
George Washington University

Friday, September 22th, 2017
6:30 pm: Pre-Lecture Reception ($5.00/person)
7:00 pm: Lecture (Free)


Abstract: For more than a century now, since soon after the discovery and translation of the Amarna Letters, it has been known that the Egyptian pharaohs Amenhotep III and Akhenaten were in communication with a number of their fellow Great Kings, ranging from the Hittites and Cypriots to the Babylonians and Assyrians. The Amarna Letters tell us about royal marriages and dowries, diplomacy and intrigues, gifts and requests. They also tell us about the Egyptian pharaohs’ relationships and interactions with the vassal kings in Canaan who owed them allegiance. Despite covering thousands of square miles of often-rugged terrain, it is clear from these letters that the Bronze Age rulers all either knew each other directly or knew of each other, so that they were connected through one, two, or three degrees at most (e.g., the friend of my friend). In this lecture, we will look again at the Amarna Letters and explore the cohesiveness of the social network that connected the Great Powers during the 14th century BCE. The evidence of the tablets implies that the Bronze Age rulers, vassal kings, merchants, and messengers of the day had already optimized the existing diplomatic, mercantile, and communication networks for maximum efficiency. By describing their relations as a social network, and not just as diplomatic or trade relationships, and by actually demonstrating the applicability of Social Network Analysis, we hope to illustrate how we can see long-familiar data in a different way.

Bios: 
Eric H. Cline is Professor of Classics and Anthropology, former Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and current Director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at The George Washington University, in Washington DC. A Fulbright scholar, National Geographic Explorer, and NEH Public Scholar, with degrees from Dartmouth, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania, he is an active field archaeologist, with more than 30 seasons of excavation and survey experience in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Cyprus, Greece, Crete, and the United States. 


Diane Harris Cline is Associate Professor of Classics and History at The George Washington University, where she teaches courses on ancient history, archaeology, mythology, literature, and culture. In her research, she is a pioneer in the digital humanities, applying social network analysis to the ancient world. A Fulbright scholar with degrees from Stanford and Princeton, she has traveled extensively in the Mediterranean, Aegean, Near East, and Black Sea regions, including as an expert study leader for Smithsonian Journeys and National Geographic. 


Location:
**This event takes place in Alexandria**
505 East Braddock Rd., Alexandria, VA 22314
Across the street from Braddock road Metro station.
Venue sponsored by  Maria & Richard Calderon and

Also at the lecture:

During the Pre-Lecture Reception, there will be a raffle for items such as journals, jewelry, DVDs, etc. ARCE-DC members receive an extra raffle ticket.

Meet-the-Speaker & Networking Dinner: 


Immediately after the lecture, join ARCE-DC members and guests for a dinner with the speaker. We will meet at Lena's Woodfired Pizza and Tap-- located just a few blocks away. Each attendee pays for their own dinner and contributes an extra $5.00 to defray the cost of the speaker's dinner.  RSVP to Carol Boyer at ccboyer@comcast.net