ROMAN SHADES 46 - ROMAN SHADES

ROMAN SHADES 46 - REPLACEMENT CORDS FOR BLINDS - PINCH PLEATED DRAPE

Roman Shades 46


roman shades 46
    roman shades
  • (Roman Shade) A single sheet shade that rises up by lift cord in a tear drop or flat style that looks like an accordion folding up back and forth on itself. Reminds me of an opera house window treatment swag. Part of our Melhanna Shade collection.
  • (Roman shade) A flat fabric shade that folds into neat horizontal pleats when raised.
  • (Roman Shade) This window treatment style consists of a fabric shade with wooden slats inserted horizontally at intervals down its entire length. It is raised and lowered via pull cord as with other blinds, but gathers soft folds as it does so.
    46
  • Country Code: +46 International Call Prefix: 00
  • forty-six: being six more than forty
  • Year 46 (XLVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.
roman shades 46 - Indian Ginger
Indian Ginger Bamboo Roman Shade - Free Shipping, 46x74
Indian Ginger Bamboo Roman Shade - Free Shipping, 46x74
Our beautiful Roman-style Bamboo shades can only be described as the sensible choice. Noted for their rich textures and beautiful colors they also help protect your home against penetrating heat and Winter air. Note: For inside mount, please order a shade that is smaller than the width of your window so that it fits inside your window or does not rub against the sides. It should be at least 1/4 of an inch smaller to ensure a proper fit. Not for outdoor use, it will mold in high humidity environment. Each shade comes with a Retro-fit kit recommended by the CPSC. This kit enables the removal of operating cords. For more information on Roman Shade safety go to windowcoverings.org.

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104 Riverside Drive House
104 Riverside Drive House
Upper West Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The 104 Riverside Drive House, originally designed by well-known architect and developer Clarence F. True, was built on speculation in 1898- 99 as one house of a picturesque group of six houses on the southeast corner of Riverside Drive and West 83rd Street. Today the 104 Riverside Drive House is architecturally significant and as one of the five extant houses in this group represents the first period of development on Riverside Drive. True designed several hundred houses, primarily in groups, on the Upper West Side in the years between 1890 and 1901, and was largely responsible for promoting the development and establishing the character of lower Riverside Drive. The houses in the group at Riverside and West 83rd Street were designed in True's signature "Elizabethan Revival" style based on French and English Renaissance prototypes and built by True's development firm, the Riverside Building Company; they are the northernmost of True's designs built along the Drive. The design of the L-shaped 104 Riverside Drive House is characterized by such picturesque elements as contrasting light orange Roman ironspot brick and limestone facing, round-arched and rectangular windows, keyed surrounds, decorative stonework, quoins, a prominent chimney, and a side courtyard. This house was originally designed with a projecting bowfront and a low stoop, but these features (along with those of the adjacent houses) became the focus of an interesting legal controversy several years after construction. As the result of a lawsuit brought by an adjacent property owner, the court ruled in 1903 that no one had the authority to place permanent encroachments onto public thoroughfares, and the owners of the houses in the True group facing onto Riverside Drive were thus ordered to remove the proj ections. In 1911 the main facades were removed and rebuilt to follow the diagonal of the Riverside Drive property lines. No. 104 (owned by architect Frederick W. Winterbum) was rebuilt with the original materials by the firm of Clinton & Russell (for which Winterburn worked) so that today, although it reflects the work of two architectural firms, it basically remains a modified version of the original picturesque Elizabethan Revival design. The Development of Riverside Drive-- The Upper West Side, known as Bloomingdale prior to its urbanization, remained largely undeveloped until the 1880s. In the early eighteenth century, Bloomingdale Road (later renamed the Boulevard and finally Broadway in 1898) was opened through rural Bloomingdale and provided the northern route out of the city which was then concentrated at the southern tip of Manhattan. The Upper West Side was included in the Randel Survey of 1811 (known as the Commissioners' Map) which established a uniform grid of avenues and cross streets in Manhattan as far north as 155th Street, although years elapsed before streets on the Upper West Side were actually laid out, some as late as the 1870s and 1880s, and the land was subdivided into building lots. Improved public transportation to the area contributed to the growth and sustained development of the Upper West Side, particularly the completion in 1879 of the Elevated Railway on Ninth Avenue (renamed Columbus Avenue in 1890). The biggest boost to the development of the West End (the area west of Broadway), however, was the creation of Riverside Drive and Park (a designated New York City Scenic Landmark). The presence of the Park and Drive was an important factor in making this area desirable for high-quality residential development. In 1865 the first proposal for converting the land on the Upper West Side along the eastern shore of the Hudson River into an ornamental park had been presented by Park Commissioner William R. Martin. The purchase of the park site and initial plans were approved in 1866. The drive, as proposed at this time, was to be a straight 100-foot wide road; however, this plan was impractical due to the existing topography. Hired by the Commissioners in 1873, Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), already distinguished by his collaboration with Calvert Vaux (1824-1895) in the successful design for Central Park, proposed an alternate scheme. Olmsted's design for Riverside Park and Drive took into consideration the pre-existing topography, landscape possibilities, and views, resulting in a park and drive that would be amenable for horses and pleasure driving, would provide shaded walks for pedestrians, and would also allow easy access to and scenic vistas from the real estate bordering it on the east. Olmsted's plan was adopted by the Commissioners but the park was not executed under his supervision, due to his departure from New York City; it was actually developed between 1875 and 1900 by other designers including Vaux, Samuel Parsons, and Julius Munckwitz, who did not adhere to Olmsted's original scheme in its entirety. By the fall of 1879
Bulla Regia
Bulla Regia
Bulla Regia is an archaeological site in northwestern Tunisia, a former Roman city near modern Jendouba. It is noted for its Hadrianic-era semi-subterranean housing, a protection from the fierce heat and effects of the sun. Many of the mosaic floors have been left in situ; others may be seen at the Bardo Museum, Tunis. There is also a small museum connected with the site. The Berber origins of Bulla Regia probably pre-dated its Punic culture: imported Greek ceramics of the fourth century BCE have been found; it came under the hegemony of Carthage during the third century, when inscriptions reveal that the inhabitants venerated Baal Hammon and buried their dead in urns, Punic style. A capital from a temple of Tanit is preserved at the site's museum. Broadly speaking, it was part of the territory conquered for Rome in 203 BCE by Scipio Africanus, but in 156 BCE it became the capital of the Numidian king Massinissa, who "recovered the lands of his ancestors", according to an inscription, and gave to the site its epithet Regia ("Royal"); later, one of his sons had a residence in the city. Under the Numidians, a regularized orthogonal grid street plan in the Hellenistic manner [1] was imposed on at least part of the earlier irregular system of alleys and insulae (Thebaut). The Romans assumed direct control in 46 BCE, when Julius Caesar organized the province of Africa Nova and rewarded the (perhaps simply neutral) conduct of Bulla Regia in the Civil Wars by making it a free city. Under Hadrian, it was refounded as Colonia Aelia Hadriana Augusta Bulla Regia, giving its citizens full Romanitas. Its small amphitheatre, the subject of a reproach in a sermon of Augustine of Hippo, retains the crispness of its edges and steps because it lay buried until 1960-61. To this day, the Roman Catholic Church retains this site as a bishopric, a titular see, Bullensium Regiorum. In the unique domus architecture developed in the city, a ground-level storey, open to the warming winter sun, stood above a subterranean level, built round a two-story atrium. Open-bottomed terracotta bottle-shapes were built into vaulting. Water sprinkled on the floors brought the colors of the mosaics to life while they provided cooling by evaporation. In the House of the Hunt, the basilica, with an apse at its head, a transept and dependent spaces opening into what would be the nave if it were a church, has been instanced (Thebert) as an example of the conjunction between public architecture and the domus of the ruling class in the fourth century, spaces soon to be Christianized as churches and cathedrals. The subtle colors and shading and the modelling of three-dimensional forms of the finest mosaics at Bulla Regia are not surpassed by any in North Africa, where the Roman art of mosaic floors reached its fullest development. The mosaic of a haloed Amphitrite (House of Amphitrite) is often illustrated. Decline and Destruction After its season of flourishing, Bulla Regia was slowly degraded under Byzantine rule. As elsewhere in the Late Empire, the local aristocracy found themselves in a position to increase the extent of their houses at the expense of public space: the House of the Fisherman was adapted to link two separate insulae turning a thoroughfare into a dead end. Finally an earthquake destroyed Bulla Regia, collapsing its first floors into the subterranean floors. Archaeological Discovery Drifting sand protected the abandoned sites, which were forgotten until the first excavations were begun, in 1906, in part spurred by the destruction of the monumental entrance to the Roman city. The forum, surrounded by porticoes, was excavated in 1949-52. Its public basilica had an apse at each end. As a cathedral it had a highly unusual cruciform baptismal font inserted the center of the rear (west end) of its nave (Jensen). WIKIPEDIA

roman shades 46
roman shades 46
Radiance 0216118 Capri Bamboo Roman Shade Natural 46x64
Natural- Sensual textures and colors abound in this fabulous window treatment. A blending of natural matchstick and bamboo, with an intricate weaving cord creates a vast array of natural tones that will dance as the gentle light of day seeps through. The rich tones create an exotic decorator feel while creating a lasting impression of grace, style and elegance. Created to gently fold into the classic Roman shade design, the Capri Natural shade will make a unique impression in any room. The warm color blend easily with rich woods, supple leathers and natural fabrics.

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