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  • A screen, plate, or layer of a substance that absorbs light or other radiation or selectively absorbs some of its components
  • (filter) an electrical device that alters the frequency spectrum of signals passing through it
  • A porous device for removing impurities or solid particles from a liquid or gas passed through it
  • A device for suppressing electrical or sound waves of frequencies not required
  • (filter) remove by passing through a filter; "filter out the impurities"
  • (filter) device that removes something from whatever passes through it
    cheap
  • relatively low in price or charging low prices; "it would have been cheap at twice the price"; "inexpensive family restaurants"
  • brassy: tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
  • (of an item for sale) Low in price; worth more than its cost
  • Charging low prices
  • (of prices or other charges) Low
  • bum: of very poor quality; flimsy
    kn
  • .kn is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Saint Kitts and Nevis. It is administered by the University of Puerto Rico, Central Administration.
  • This is a list of digraphs used in various Latin alphabets. (See also List of Cyrillic digraphs.) Capitalization involves only the first letter (ch – Ch) unless otherwise stated (ij – IJ).
  • (KNS) Staphylococcus (from the ???????, staphyle, "bunch of grapes" and ??????, kokkos, "granule") is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria. Under the microscope they appear round (cocci), and form in grape-like clusters.
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1:72 Focke Wulf Ta-183 'Huckebein" - 1./JG 300 use (Luft'46; PM Models)
1:72 Focke Wulf Ta-183 'Huckebein" -  1./JG 300 use (Luft'46; PM Models)
Visual effect filter experiment. A kind of interim project: a small and simple kit which came in the wake of some Luft '46 research for a bigger future project. Anyway, the PM Model kit of the Ta-183 is cheap, so I finished it up in about a week. Some background: The Focke-Wulf Ta 183 Huckebein (named after a raven from german folklore) was a design for a jet-powered fighter aircraft intended as the successor to the Messerschmitt Me 262 and other day fighters in Luftwaffe service during World War II. Its development started in 1942 and it was developed only to the extent of wind tunnel models when the war ended. In early 1945, the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) became aware of Allied jet developments, and were particularly concerned that they might have to face the Gloster Meteor over the continent. In response, they instituted the so-called Emergency Fighter Program, ending production of most bomber and multi-role aircraft in favor of fighters, especially jet fighters. Additionally, they accelerated the development of experimental designs that would guarantee a performance edge over the Allied designs, designs that would replace the first German jet fighters. The result was a series of advanced designs, some using swept wings for improved transonic performance, others instead using the tailless design to lower drag to the same end. Since German aircraft engineers were aware that tailless designs might encounter serious stability problems in the transonic, a variety of stabilization methods such as brakes on the wings were considered for such aircraft or simply adding conventional tail surfaces. Kurt Tank's (Hence the "Ta" abbreviation) design team led by Hans Multhopp designed in 1945 a fighter known as "Huckebein" (a cartoon raven that traditionally makes trouble for others), also known as Project V (Project VI in some references) or Design II at Focke-Wulf. The first flight of the aircraft was projected for May 1945, but none were completed by 8 April 1945, when British troops captured the Focke-Wulf facilities. General characteristics: Crew: one Length: 9.20 m (30 ft 2 in) Wingspan: 10.00 m (32 ft 10 in) Wing area: 22.5 m? (242 ft?) Empty weight: 2,380 kg (5,247 lb) Loaded weight: 4,300 kg (9,480 lb) Powerplant: 1 ? Heinkel HeS 011 turbojet, 13 kN (2,700 lbf) Maximum speed: 955 km/h (593 mph) Service ceiling: 14,000 m (45,932 ft) Rate of climb: 20.4 m/s (4,020 ft/min) Wing loading: 196 kg/m? (41 lb/ft?) Thrust/weight: 0.37 Armament: 4 ? 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 108 cannons, provision for a semi-recessed 500kg (1.102 lb) bomb under the fuselage. A side note: Some sources claim the small X-4 air-to-air missile as a potential weapon (there's even a 1:48 kit of the Ta-183 bearing four of them!), but I am in doubt if this would have happened at all. The missile's original design used an optically and wire-guided system. Steering a missile at 600mph and at close range to a gun-toting bomber formation would certainly have over-exhausted a pilot's talent. The kit and its assembly: The PM Model (formerly Pioneer 2?) kit made in Turkey is simple, if not blunt and crude. You just get a single polystyrene sprew and a clear canopy, details are simple, the interior a joke. But the proportions are good, and with little effort you can pimp the thing to “something better”. So I took the basic kit and did some modifications: New cockpit interior with a new seat and a dashboard and side consoles made from cardboard. Not authentic, but just to have something inside at all! A Matchbox pilot was added, too, as well as a radio unit behind the seat and finder sight. The canopy was divided in order to present and open cockpit. The landing gear was totally revamped – the only original pieces left are the main landing gear struts. The main gear wells were cut open from inside and a new interior, made from cardboard, too, with some simulated spars was implanted. The front wheel comes from a 1:72 scale Grumman Panther (Matchbox), the main wheels from a Saab Viggen (Airfix). Additional main gear struts come from a Panavia Tornado (Italieri). The exhaust pipe from a F-86 was implanted (the original "thing" is gruesome!) Two antennae were added on the fuselage Almost all steering flaps were moved out of neutral position and the landing flaps were lowered The cannon mounds were drilled open and pieces from steel syringes were added as 30mm MK 108s Additional anti-bomber weaponry in the form of "Werfergranate 42" launchers under the wings – proven unguided missiles which had already been in on Me 262, FW 190 and Bf 109, 110 and 410 fighters in the late WWII. Painting It's a totally free design, but I tried to stay true to late Luftwaffe camouflage and marking style. I used a profile of a Bf 109G-10 from 1./JG 300 as a benchmark, and tried to keep the exterior as simple as possible. Colors are: RLM 82 (Dunkelgrun, Testors #2091) RLM 75 (Grauviol
1:72 Focke Wulf Ta-183 'Huckebein" - 1./JG 300 use (Luft'46; PM Models)
1:72 Focke Wulf Ta-183 'Huckebein" -  1./JG 300 use (Luft'46; PM Models)
Visual effect filter experiment, with sepia and some ageing. A kind of interim project: a small and simple kit which came in the wake of some Luft '46 research for a bigger future project. Anyway, the PM Model kit of the Ta-183 is cheap, so I finished it up in about a week. Some background: The Focke-Wulf Ta 183 Huckebein (named after a raven from german folklore) was a design for a jet-powered fighter aircraft intended as the successor to the Messerschmitt Me 262 and other day fighters in Luftwaffe service during World War II. Its development started in 1942 and it was developed only to the extent of wind tunnel models when the war ended. In early 1945, the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) became aware of Allied jet developments, and were particularly concerned that they might have to face the Gloster Meteor over the continent. In response, they instituted the so-called Emergency Fighter Program, ending production of most bomber and multi-role aircraft in favor of fighters, especially jet fighters. Additionally, they accelerated the development of experimental designs that would guarantee a performance edge over the Allied designs, designs that would replace the first German jet fighters. The result was a series of advanced designs, some using swept wings for improved transonic performance, others instead using the tailless design to lower drag to the same end. Since German aircraft engineers were aware that tailless designs might encounter serious stability problems in the transonic, a variety of stabilization methods such as brakes on the wings were considered for such aircraft or simply adding conventional tail surfaces. Kurt Tank's (Hence the "Ta" abbreviation) design team led by Hans Multhopp designed in 1945 a fighter known as "Huckebein" (a cartoon raven that traditionally makes trouble for others), also known as Project V (Project VI in some references) or Design II at Focke-Wulf. The first flight of the aircraft was projected for May 1945, but none were completed by 8 April 1945, when British troops captured the Focke-Wulf facilities. General characteristics: Crew: one Length: 9.20 m (30 ft 2 in) Wingspan: 10.00 m (32 ft 10 in) Wing area: 22.5 m? (242 ft?) Empty weight: 2,380 kg (5,247 lb) Loaded weight: 4,300 kg (9,480 lb) Powerplant: 1 ? Heinkel HeS 011 turbojet, 13 kN (2,700 lbf) Maximum speed: 955 km/h (593 mph) Service ceiling: 14,000 m (45,932 ft) Rate of climb: 20.4 m/s (4,020 ft/min) Wing loading: 196 kg/m? (41 lb/ft?) Thrust/weight: 0.37 Armament: 4 ? 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 108 cannons, provision for a semi-recessed 500kg (1.102 lb) bomb under the fuselage. A side note: Some sources claim the small X-4 air-to-air missile as a potential weapon (there's even a 1:48 kit of the Ta-183 bearing four of them!), but I am in doubt if this would have happened at all. The missile's original design used an optically and wire-guided system. Steering a missile at 600mph and at close range to a gun-toting bomber formation would certainly have over-exhausted a pilot's talent. The kit and its assembly: The PM Model (formerly Pioneer 2?) kit made in Turkey is simple, if not blunt and crude. You just get a single polystyrene sprew and a clear canopy, details are simple, the interior a joke. But the proportions are good, and with little effort you can pimp the thing to “something better”. So I took the basic kit and did some modifications: New cockpit interior with a new seat and a dashboard and side consoles made from cardboard. Not authentic, but just to have something inside at all! A Matchbox pilot was added, too, as well as a radio unit behind the seat and finder sight. The canopy was divided in order to present and open cockpit. The landing gear was totally revamped – the only original pieces left are the main landing gear struts. The main gear wells were cut open from inside and a new interior, made from cardboard, too, with some simulated spars was implanted. The front wheel comes from a 1:72 scale Grumman Panther (Matchbox), the main wheels from a Saab Viggen (Airfix). Additional main gear struts come from a Panavia Tornado (Italieri). The exhaust pipe from a F-86 was implanted (the original "thing" is gruesome!) Two antennae were added on the fuselage Almost all steering flaps were moved out of neutral position and the landing flaps were lowered The cannon mounds were drilled open and pieces from steel syringes were added as 30mm MK 108s Additional anti-bomber weaponry in the form of "Werfergranate 42" launchers under the wings – proven unguided missiles which had already been in on Me 262, FW 190 and Bf 109, 110 and 410 fighters in the late WWII. Painting It's a totally free design, but I tried to stay true to late Luftwaffe camouflage and marking style. I used a profile of a Bf 109G-10 from 1./JG 300 as a benchmark, and tried to keep the exterior as simple as possible. Colors are: RLM 82 (Dunkelgrun, Tes

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