AUTOMOTIVE REFRIGERATION. REFRIGERATION

Automotive refrigeration. Cooler freezer. Homer simpson fridge.

Automotive Refrigeration


automotive refrigeration
    refrigeration
  • the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
  • deliberately lowering the body's temperature for therapeutic purposes; "refrigeration by immersing the patient's body in a cold bath"
  • (refrigerant) any substance used to provide cooling (as in a refrigerator)
    automotive
  • of or relating to motor vehicles; "automotive supplies"
  • containing within itself the means of propulsion or movement; "a self-propelled vehicle"
  • The automotive industry designs, develops, manufactures, markets, and sells the world's motor vehicles. The automotive industry is one of the most important economic sectors by revenue.
  • Of, relating to, or concerned with motor vehicles
automotive refrigeration - Sponge Neoprene
Sponge Neoprene With Adhesive 1/8" Thick X 54" Wide X 10' Long
Sponge Neoprene With Adhesive 1/8" Thick X 54" Wide X 10' Long
This is a closed cell sponge neoprene. It is primarily used as a cushion and sealing tape against air and moisture. It can also be used as a dust seal for furniture, store fixtures and partitions, noise insulation, padding, expansion joints of precast concrete and steel, vapour barrier for prefab buildings, HVAC and refrigeration, automotive. It is also an excellent door seals for truck and bus bodies, offload equipment and transformer cabinets. More selections available, search for them on Amazon!

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9 Ninth Avenue
9 Ninth Avenue
Meatpacking District, Gansevoort Market Historic District, Manhattan From 1878, when the John Jacob Astor I Estate was partitioned, this property passed to William Astor, then to John Jacob Astor IV, and finally to William Vincent Astor, who held it until 1943. This building has had a complex construction history. Its present form resulted from an alteration in 1921-22 (Alt. 2409-1921) when four two- and three-story stables and wagon storage buildings were unified at two stories, fortified with interior steel girders, and converted to a garage (on both stories) with stores. It appears that the previous buildings were: a two-story former store dwelling (11 Little West 12' Street) altered in 1881 (Alt. 972-1881, A.B. Van Heusen, builder); a two-story stables building (17 Ninth Avenue) rebuilt in 1889 (Alt. 597-1 889, Hugh Getty, mason); a one-story market and stables building (9 Ninth Avenue) rebuilt and raised to two stories in 1905 (Alt. 1398-1905, George M. McCabe, architect), after being condemned by the Board of Health; and a three-story stables building (19 Ninth Avenue) constructed in 1908 (NB 647-1906, George M. McCabe, architect). Commercial tenants both before and after the 1920s alteration were mostly in the fruit and produce business, including several long-term ones: Domenico Calarco, Frank Cliento & Co., Angelo Gionfrida, West Side Water Cress Co., and C. Starace & Bro. (later C. Starace & Bros., Inc. and J.J. Starace, Inc.). Domenico Calarco purchased the building from Astor in 1943 and held it until 1962. It operated as the Radio Garage and Avenue Garage until the 1940s, then as the Gansevoort Garage (Leo and Frank Calarco) and Olympia Garage. This building was the result of a 1921-22 alteration during one of the major phases of development in the area, when transportation and market-related buildings were being constructed or significantly adapted in the district. ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Belgian block paving still visible on most streets. The street layout is shaped by the transition between the irregular pattern of northwestern Greenwich Village (as far north as Gansevoort Street) and the grid of the 1811 Commissioner's Plan. Unusually large and open intersections contribute to the area's unique quality, particularly where Ninth Avenue meets West 14'~S treet and Gansevoort Street (which was widened in l887), and provide sweeping vistas that showcase the unusual building typology and mixed-use quality of the district. Aside from Tribeca, the Gansevoort Market Historic District is the only remaining marketplace district that served the once-flourishing Hudson River commercial waterfront. The earliest buildings in the historic district date from the period between 1840 and 1854, most built as rowhouses and town houses, several of which soon became very early working-class tenements (all eventually had stores on the ground floor). The area's early mixed use, however, is evident in the rare surviving early factory building (c. 1849-60), on a flatiron-shaped lot, for Col. Silas C. Herring, a nationally significant manufacturer of safes and locks, at 669-685 Hudson Street. This mixed use, consisting of single-family houses, multiple dwellings, and industry was unusual for the period. The stretch of Ninth Avenue between Gansevoort and West 15' Streets, albeit altered and interrupted with later additions, offers the vista of a distinctive Manhattan streetscape featuring twenty buildings of the 1840s: the rowhouses at Nos. 3-7 (c. 1849) and Nos. 21-27 (c. 1844-46), the Herring factory, and culminating in the rare, picturesque ensemble of twelve rowhouses and town houses, Nos. 44-60 Ninth Avenue and 351-355 West 14th Street (c. 1841-46), at the wide, angled intersection with Hudson and West 14" Streets. Another business from this period was the woodworking factory of the prominent building firm of James
420-424 14th Street
420-424 14th Street
Meatpacking District, Gansevoort Market Historic District, Manhattan This six-story store-and-loft building was constructed in 1903-04 for Diedrich and George A. Fink, paper and woodware merchants. By 1909, both Finks were deceased and the property was transferred to John Jordan, its builder. Also in 1909, the building concern of John Jordan & Son went bankrupt. Adeline S. Fink, presumably the widow of one of the Finks, married Jordan in 1910. This structure appears initially to have been used mostly for storage, packing, and offices. It was owned briefly in 1919-21 by poultry dealer August Silz [see 414-418 West 14th Street and 419 West 13' Street]. In 1921 (Alt. 2587-1921) the structure was converted into a cold storage warehouse for meatpackers. Edward Davis, Inc., supplier of meat and poultry for hotels, restaurants and steamships, was a long-term tenant. A painted sign advertising "Edward Davis, Inc." is still partially visible above the fourth story. Between 1966 and 1970, the building was owned and used by the New York Loin Corp. The next owner was Alfred P. Seligman, also owner of the Imperial Veal & Lamb Co., located here, and 426 West 14" Street [see], which becanie associated this building after its purchase by Seligman in 1977. In 1996-99, the upper stories were converted into offices. This neo-Classical style building, which is largely intact, contributes to the historically mixed architecture and varied uses - including market-related functions - of the Gansevoort Market Historic District. Constructed in 1903-04, during one of the major phases of development of the district, when buildings were constructed for storage- and produce-related businesses and other market uses, this building further contributes to the visual cohesion of the district through its brick and stone facade, metal cornice, and metaI canopy. Commercial Tenants Diedrich and George A. Fink, paper and woodware (1904-09); A. Silz, Inc., poultry (1906); William A. Vanwoert & Co., produce (1906); Edward Davis, Inc., meat and poultry for hotels, restaurants and steamships; Renid Sterilizing Corp (1929-65); Great Western Distributors (1939); Jiffy Foods, Inc. (1942); New York Loin Corp. (1966-70); Imperial Veal &Lamb Co. (1970-88); Heller Gallery (1999-2002) ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Belgian block paving still visible on most streets. The street layout is shaped by the transition between the irregular pattern of northwestern Greenwich Village (as far north as Gansevoort Street) and the grid of the 1811 Commissioner's Plan. Unusually large and open intersections contribute to the area's unique quality, particularly where Ninth Avenue meets West 14'~S treet and Gansevoort Street (which was widened in l887), and provide sweeping vistas that showcase the unusual building typology and mixed-use quality of the district. Aside from Tribeca, the Gansevoort Market Historic District is the only remaining marketplace district that served the once-flourishing Hudson River commercial waterfront. The earliest buildings in the historic district date from the period between 1840 and 1854, most built as rowhouses and town houses, several of which soon became very early working-class tenements (all eventually had stores on the ground floor). The area's early mixed use, however, is evident in the rare surviving early factory building (c. 1849-60), on a flatiron-shaped lot, for Col. Silas C. Herring, a nationally significant manufacturer of safes and locks, at 669-685 Hudson Street. This mixed use, consisting of single-family houses, multiple dwellings, and industry was unusual for the period. The stretch of Ninth Avenue between Gansevoort and West 15' Streets, albeit altered and interrupted with later additions, offers the vista of a distinctive Manhattan streetscape featuring twenty buildings of the 1840s: the rowhouses at Nos. 3-7 (c. 18

automotive refrigeration
automotive refrigeration
Low Temperature and Cryogenic Refrigeration (NATO Science Series II: Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry)
Refrigeration plays a prominent role in our everyday lives, and cryogenics plays a major role in medical science, space technology and the cooling of low-temperature electronics. This volume contains chapters on basic refrigeration systems, non-compression refrigeration and cooling, and topics related to global environmental issues, alternative refrigerants, optimum refrigerant selection, cost-quality optimization of refrigerants, advanced thermodynamics of reverse-cycle machines, applications in medicine, cryogenics, heat pipes, gas-solid absorption refrigeration, multisalt resorption heat pumps, cryocoolers, thermoacoustic refrigeration, cryogenic heat transfer and enhancement and other topics covering theory, design, and applications, such as pulse tube refrigeration, which is the most efficient of all cryocoolers and can be used in space missions.

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