BEESCAPING

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    BEESCAPING  

Here is a useful list of the major sources of plants that provide nectar for bees in the Panhandle region of Florida. An important consideration for “beescaping” is the provision of food year-round for bee forage. Many of these trees and plants may already thrive where you live, or you may consider planting some. The bloom times for plants will vary from place to place, but generally an important nectar source for bees in one geographic area is likely to be an important nectar source in other regions. It is also important to keep in mind that bees require large quantities of nectar and even though there may be a small patch of flowers of interest to bees close to their hive, they might only visit a quantity source of nectar farther away (perhaps the amount provided by a large tree in full bloom) and pass-up the opportunity to feed on a small patch of flowers.

 

** We would like to note that this list is a work in progress and we plan to continue adding plants to this list for some time as we work with  people and learn more and more about bee friendly food sources.  This is something we will post on our web page and update regularly!! (http://apalacheebee.googlepages.com)

 

Bloom Time

Native

Edible

Ornamental

JANUARY

Red Maple

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEBRUARY

Red Maple

 

Dandelion

 

Willow

 

 

 

American Holly

 

 

 

Red Bud

 

 

 

Tulip Poplar

 

 

 

Buckwheat Titi *

 

 

 

 

 

 

MARCH

Gallberry

Blackberry

Dandelion

 

Willow

Peach

 

 

American Holly

Citrus/satsuma

 

 

Red Bud

Pear

 

 

Tulip Poplar

 

 

 

Buckwheat Titi *

 

 

 

 

 

 

APRIL

Gallberry

Apple

Clover

 

Buckwheat Titi *

Blackberry

Dandelion

 

Tupelo

Blueberry

 

 

 

Peach

 

 

 

Citrus/satsuma

 

 

 

Kumquat

 

 

 

Pear

 

 

 

 

 

MAY

Gallberry

Apple

Clover

 

Tupelo

Blackberry

Dandelion

 

Saw Palmetto

Blueberry

 

 

Sumac

Corn

 

 

 

Kumquat

 

 

 

 

 

JUNE

Saw Palmetto

Blueberry

Asters

 

Partridge Pea

Corn

Clover

 

Sumac

 

Dandelion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY

Saw Palmetto

 

Asters

 

Partridge Pea

 

Clover

 

Sumac

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST

Partridge Pea

 

Asters

 

 

 

Clover

 

 

 

 

SEPTEMBER

Partridge Pea

 

Golden Rod

 

 

 

Asters

 

 

 

Clover

 

 

 

 

OCTOBER

 

 

Golden Rod

 

 

 

Asters

 

 

 

 

NOVEMBER

 

Loquat

Golden Rod

 

 

 

Asters

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER

 

Loquat

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a list of some plants that do not provide nectar, however do provide POLLEN to the bees. Bees collect both pollen and nectar at many flowers however plants do not always have to provide both in order to have an importance to bees.

 

Grouping

Name

native

Dogwood

native

Pine

Non-native and Native

Corn and grasses

Non-native

Roses

Native

Ash, Walnuts, Pecans

 

  

There are a fair number of invasive non-native plants that are important food plants for bees. You may want to avoid planting these plants, however if you happen to live near some of these plants, you can rest assured that your bees will have a floral source.

 

Grouping

Name

Non-native invasive

Chinese Tallow

Non-native invasive

Brazilian Pepper (S.Florida mostly)

Non-native  

Silk tree, Mimosa, silky acacia

 

 

Here are some plants known to be important food sources that you could consider planting in your yard or supporting their existence if they are already there! The blooming time will vary year round depending on the many varieties of these plants.

 

Grouping

Name

ornamental

Honeysuckle

ornamental

Privet

food

Persimmon

ornamental

Bee balm

ornamental

Butterfly Bush

ornamental

Crape myrtle

ornamental

Purple coneflower

ornamental

Sage

native

Yaupon Holly

native

Magnolia

food

Basil and Mints

weedy

Spanish needle (Bidens)(fall)

 

It is also important to note that there are some floral sources that you might want to avoid.  Yellow Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) and what is known as white or summer Titi may have some chemistry that is toxic to bees. The presence of small amounts in your neighborhood may be no cause for concern however it is important to BEE aware that not all flowers are good for bees!!

 

For more information on Florida Bee Botany look up:     http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/AA/AA08800.pdf