STAPLES FOLDING TABLES. STAPLES FOLDING

Staples Folding Tables. Sofas And Tables.

Staples Folding Tables


staples folding tables
    folding tables
  • A trestle table is an item of furniture comprising two or three trestle supports linked by a longitudinal cross-member over which a board or tabletop is placed.
    staples
  • A main or important element of something, esp. of a diet
  • (staple) basic: (usually plural) a necessary commodity for which demand is constant
  • The fiber of cotton or wool considered with regard to its length and degree of fineness
  • (staple) secure or fasten with a staple or staples; "staple the papers together"
  • A main item of trade or production
  • (staple) necessary or important, especially regarding food or commodities; "wheat is a staple crop"
staples folding tables - Premier/Martin Yale
Premier/Martin Yale Products - Auto Desktop Folder, 4000Sht/Hr, 21-3/4"x9-1/2"x14-1/4", GY - Sold as 1 EA - RapidFold Auto Desktop Folder automatically feeds and folds a stack of paper with dimensions up to 8-1/2" x 11". Use in mailrooms, offices, churches or clubs. Folds up to 4,000 sheets per hour. Easily adjusts to create letter and half folds. Folds paper weights from 16 to 28 lb. bond. Feed table holds up to 50 sheets of paper. Handy bypass feeds up to three sheets with or without staples.
Premier/Martin Yale Products - Auto Desktop Folder, 4000Sht/Hr, 21-3/4"x9-1/2"x14-1/4", GY - Sold as 1 EA - RapidFold Auto Desktop Folder automatically feeds and folds a stack of paper with dimensions up to 8-1/2" x 11". Use in mailrooms, offices, churches or clubs. Folds up to 4,000 sheets per hour. Easily adjusts to create letter and half folds. Folds paper weights from 16 to 28 lb. bond. Feed table holds up to 50 sheets of paper. Handy bypass feeds up to three sheets with or without staples.
Premier/Martin Yale Products - Auto Desktop Folder, 4000Sht/Hr, 21-3/4"x9-1/2"x14-1/4", GY - Sold as 1 EA

RapidFold Auto Desktop Folder automatically feeds and folds a stack of paper with dimensions up to 8-1/2" x 11". Use in mailrooms, offices, churches or clubs. Folds up to 4,000 sheets per hour. Easily adjusts to create letter and half folds. Folds paper weights from 16 to 28 lb. bond. Feed table holds up to 50 sheets of paper. Handy bypass feeds up to three sheets with or without staples. Includes stacking tray.

Sold as 1 EA
Manufacturer: Premier/Martin Yale
Total percentage of recycled content: 0
Post Consumer Waste: 0
Country of origin: TW

79% (11)
Go Birds!!
Go Birds!!
I've been a Cardinals fan since age 7. I distinctly remember the '87 Cards/Twins World Series games going on far past my bedtime, and my dad lovingly cutting out the results from the next morning's paper and laying them at my place at the breakfast table for me to find when I got up to go to school. I saw my first in-person game at the old Busch Stadium on a rainy, nasty day in '88. I remember having upper deck seats behind home plate and that the Birds played the Astros. I was in hog heaven, and I'm pretty certain that the rest of my family was miserable. I was fanatical from about '88 through '93. I had stats and rosters memorized, Topps cards scattered everywhere. I have indelible memories of laying in bed on warm summer nights, listening to the sound of Jack Buck's voice wafting in over KMOX, piped in through that old, gray clock radio with the 8 track player in. "For a hole in your roof or a whole new roof" mixed with "that's a winner" folded in upon "head for the mountains of Busch" plus Mike Shannon's slightly unhinged cackle... Those were some consistently mediocre, feckless teams during the height of my youthful obsession. When Felix Jose or Ray Lankford are your team's big power hitters and you play in a park as cavernous as the pre-renovation Busch Stadium Mk. II, you're in trouble. I remember the 100th anniversary season of '92, taking a tour of Busch and even getting to sit in the dugouts and go onto the (then astroturfed) field. I got to jump up against the outfield wall and pretend I was robbing a slugger of a round-tripper. I was such a dork, but I didn't care. I still don't, really. I'd do it again today. Going to see game in person was a huge treat, as it was expensive then too, just not quite as horribly so as at present. The team had a deal with local schools where honor roll students could get 4 free upper deck tickets per year. So that meant at least two games a year for me. My dad and I would go, sit in the nosebleeds, pack a thermos of lemonade and a bag of peanuts, and have a blast. He was so kind to me, going out and staying up late (till the final out) even though he got up so early for work every day. Once in a great while, he'd get comp tickets from work and we'd sit in the middle deck or even the box seats! Every so often he'd splurge and buy us an order of nachos (with tons of jalapenos) or a big Coke. I think one of the moments where I realized I was actually becoming an adult was at a game when I was maybe 19 or 20. My dad bought us each a big Budweiser and we sat there with our feet up on the backs of the chairs in the row in front of us. I miss those times, I want to do it again as soon as possible. I remember Anheuser-Busch selling the team and nervously awaiting some mystery savior to buy the team and maintain the traditions. I was overjoyed when the new, local ownership group took over, and sunk some much-needed money into the team & stadium. My high school years turned into my college years, and I was too cool for baseball, mostly. Sadly, but honestly, I just kind of forgot about my Birds. But I did manage to keep up with the team a little bit. I listened with my fingers crossed to the radio broadcast of the '96 NLCS against Atlanta as it was piped in over the PA of the grocery store I worked at. I watched Mark McGwire hit his 62nd home run from a tiny TV in my college dorm room. I managed to see a game or two every summer while I was back in the St. Louis area. Slowly, as my college career wound down, I rediscovered the joy of the Cardinals. I watched every agonizing out of the 2001 division series against Arizona. That September and October brought me back into the fold. After that, I rediscovered my roots. Since then, I've been lucky enough to be around for some of the Cards' best teams in a long, long while. I've been spoilt with six playoff appearances in the past seven years, a bunch of divisions won, two pennants, and, Zarquon willing, a Series title in '06. Lucky, lucky man. I managed to see two or three games the summer of '05, the last season at the old Busch. Ryan, JR & I stayed through a pouring rain and eventually had an entire section of upper deck to ourselves. I saw a killer Mark Mulder complete game shutout vs. Houston on a cold, windy April afternoon. I watched the skeleton of the new park rising next door, wedged between the current stadium & Highway 40. I didn't want them to build a new stadium, it felt needless and an affront to the club's tradition. It felt like the decision was motivated completely by money -- the old Busch would definitely do. Once I accepted that the new stadium was going to happen one way or the other, and once I saw the design for Busch Mk. III and that it was going to be tasteful and respectful, I made my peace. Then I packed up and moved to Northern California. Once they'd made sure I was truly gone, they wasted no time in putting the
T.W. Paterson Book Cover
T.W. Paterson Book Cover
"I know what I've given you but don't know what you have received." This adage could very well have been said by T. W. Paterson (TWP) regarding his latest book: Historic Hikes, Sites & Sights of the Cowichan Valley. Tom's latest offering is really the most information regarding this subject one could publish in print and still have fit into one's pocket. The real value of this book -- which is really three books in one -- is as one travels these Cowichan Valley rail-trails today, ready references can be made by consulting its pages, maps or photographs. Firstly, as its title implies, Historic Hikes, Sites & Sights of the Cowichan Valley, is a history of the Cowichan Valley's major railways, why they were built and the communities that were spawned as a result. Secondly, it's a the most complete reference regarding how to access these rails2trails and the points-of-interest they provide. Thirdly, it's a history of the Kinsol Trestle and its ongoing Restoration Project. As one who has cycled or walked all of the trails Tom writes about, it was fascinating to learn of the many points-of-interest along said routes of which I know nothing. The book is 122 pages, softcover (stapled) book measures only 5.5 x 8.25 inches (135x210mm) and will fit in one's pocket or pack for ready-reference on the trail. The cover is a colour image of the Kinsol trestle taken from its northern end. This image is overlaid with text and other relevant images. The book is published by Firgrove Publishing which is owned and operated by TWP. The Table of Contents is printed on p.IX after the Acknowledgements and reminders regarding trail safety and etiquette. Also include is the author/publisher's short bio. The Table of Contents lists eight (8) Parts with titles but no page numbers are given. This precludes one quickly turning to the page number and the section wanted. Most readers, after thumbing through the pages looking for items, will probably make their own numbered list. This will make a useful finding aid for subsequent searches. Part One is only eight pages and gives an overview of what are generally described as the Trans Canada/Cowichan Valley Trails. This part also includes the proposal to complete the Spirit of 2010 Trail and the section named the Runner's Trail. Access points to the Trans Canada Trail (TCT) are described in detail and reason the old CNR Mainline could not be completed through the Capital Regional District's (CRD) Watershed area. The CRD's Sooke Lake Watershed is currently the end-of-trail from Victoria, BC, if using the Galloping Goose Trail northbound. Part Two: The History of the CNR Mainline is 11 pages long ending at p.29. This part reports in detail the history of the Canadian National Railway (and its predecessor --The Canadian Northern Railway) starting in 1910 to the present. Basically, the CNR extended from Victoria on Vancouver Island's southern tip (southeastern tip actually) to Kissinger -- beyond Cowichan Lake's western end. For those readers feeling geographically challenged when starting to read Tom's book -- fear not. By the time one's finished reading, and referencing the included Cowichan Valley maps, all will become abundantly clear. Part Three is listed on the Table of Contents page using italic text; the reason being, historical parts are listed using plain text while hiking and cycling parts of the contents are listed using italic text. This method allows the reader to quickly identify the parts of the book which are of immediate interest. Simple but effective. Part three starts at page 30 and ends on page 57 which includes the centre-fold, dual-colour map. Every trestle, access point, restroom and mileage (railways use Mile Markers) markers, are given in great detail. Part Four is sixteen pages long and is the History of the Kinsol Trestle. The Kinsol Trestle Restoration fund is an ongoing effort to restore this Canadian icon for the use of future Trans Canada Trail users. The Kinsol Trestle will complete the section of the TCT between Sooke Lake Road (at Shawnigan Lake) and the Township of Lake Cowichan. Here again, in Part 4, Tom names-names and gives details with dates, Part Five is the History of the CNR's Tidewater Subdivision. The Tidewater Subdivision (TWS) operated between Deerholme in the west and Cowichan Bay in the east. Today, most of the right-of-way (ROW) has been reclaimed by First Nations Bands but Tom relates its history from when first steel was laid in 1925 until the last train run in 1988. Part Six listing is in italics. This means it's directed to those interested in: Hiking, Cycling the Tidewater Subdivision from Cowichan Bay to Deerholme. The good news is it's a wonder this right-of-way still exists at all. Were it not for the locals who use the TWS railtrail today as a shortcut into Duncan, it would all but have disappeared from the Glenora region. This railway was seen constantly by anyone drive Hwy-1 south of Duncan, B

staples folding tables
staples folding tables
Martin Yale Products - Martin Yale - Model 1501X AutoFolder, 8000 Sheets/Hour - Sold As 1 Each - Ideal for churches, schools, business and associations with frequent medium size jobs. - High speed machine automatically feeds and folds a stack of documents up to 8 3/4 x 14. - Simplified adjustment for folding 8 1/2 x 11 and 8 1/2 x 14 sheets. - Stapled sets of up to three sheets can be folded by hand-feeding into the feed table bypass. -
Martin Yale - Model 1501X AutoFolder, 8000 Sheets/Hour - Sold As 1 Each

Ideal for churches, schools, business and associations with frequent medium size jobs. High speed machine automatically feeds and folds a stack of documents up to 8 3/4 x 14. Simplified adjustment for folding 8 1/2 x 11 and 8 1/2 x 14 sheets. Stapled sets of up to three sheets can be folded by hand-feeding into the feed table bypass. Number of Folds: 4; Fold Types: Double Parallel; Half; Letter (for 8 1/2 x 11 sheets only); Z; Folder Speed - Sheets per Hour: 8000; Paper Feeder Type: Automatic.

Ideal for churches, schools, business and associations with frequent medium size jobs.
High speed machine automatically feeds and folds a stack of documents up to 8 3/4 x 14.
Simplified adjustment for folding 8 1/2 x 11 and 8 1/2 x 14 sheets.
Stapled sets of up to three sheets can be folded by hand-feeding into the feed table bypass.


Includes paper folding machine.

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