BAR HEIGHT ROUND TABLES : BAR HEIGHT

BAR HEIGHT ROUND TABLES : RECTANGULAR DINING TABLE BASE.

Bar Height Round Tables


bar height round tables
    round tables
  • A Round Table was a festive event during the Middle Ages that involved jousting, feasting, and dancing in imitation of King Arthur's legendary court. Named for Arthur's famed Round Table, the festivals generally involved jousts with blunted weapons, and often celebrated weddings or victories.
    bar height
  • The height of the bar the stool is recommended for. If the stool's seat height is around 27-29 inches then a bar height of 42 inches or 43 inches is ideal.
bar height round tables - Weather Wrap
Weather Wrap Round Bar-Height Table and Chairs Cover
Weather Wrap Round Bar-Height Table and Chairs Cover
Weather Wrap Round Bar-Height Table and Chairs Cover. Weather Wrap premium protective covers are your best choice to safeguard your table, chairs and other outdoor furniture. Protect your investment in attractive outdoor furniture! When not in use, simply slip on a Brookstone round bar-height table and chairs cover and keep it looking like new season after season. Made from tear- and puncture-resistant material, our table and chairs covers shield against sunlight, rain, snow, sap, dirt, debris and more. These outdoor table and chairs covers help your furniture stay cleaner and last longer. Reinforced elastic edging keep cover snug and in place. And the all-weather cover protects down to -22degreesF without cracking. Fits round bar-height tables and chairs up to 35 drop x 84 diameter. Keep your table and chairs looking like new, season after season--order your Weather Wrap cover today.

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The What Cheer? brigade at Tacheles
The What Cheer? brigade at Tacheles
(from wikipedia..about the building where this photo was taken) The building was constructed over the course of 15 months in 1907 and 1908 under the watch of the imperial building officer (kaiserlicher Baurat) Franz Ahrens. One year later it was opened as the Friedrichstra?enpassage, which housed several small businesses. At the time, the building complex stretched from Friedrichstra?e to Oranienburger Stra?e. The passage had entrances from both sides and served to connect the two main thoroughfares. The Friedrichstra?enpassage was the second largest of its kind in the city and the only remaining piece of large passage architecture in Europe. The construction expenses totaled approximately 7 million German marks. The five-story building was made of reinforced concrete with a colossal ribbed dome. The facade was built to be dependent upon this concrete frame. There were several small businesses on both sides of the large covered passage. The building is typically treated as an example of early Modern architecture but exhibits aspects of both Classic and Gothic styles. The complex also housed its own pneumatic tube system for sending mail and materials within the building. A group of individual shareholders hoped to establish a market advantage by capitalizing on a common location. The concept meant that stores would not be strictly separated from one another, but would instead be allowed to overlap. This was enabled by the existence of a central point-of-sale terminal, where all customers would pay for their goods. But a mere 6 months after its opening the passage had to file for bankruptcy in August 1908. The complex was then rented by Wolf Wertheim, who in 1909 opened a new department store, which operated until 1914. The building was auctioned off shortly before World War I. It is unclear how the building was used between 1914 and 1924. In 1924, among other additions to the building, a deep cellar was built. This cellar still exists today and is also known as the Tresorraum. The height of the ceiling in the passage was lowered to that of the stores, which changed the appearance of the building completely. [edit]Haus der Technik After 1928 the building was used as a show room by the Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft (General Electric Company). It was renamed Haus der Technik by the proprietor, the Berliner Commerz- und Privatbank. The AEG used the space to display products and advise customers. The former AEG show room, located at Luisenstra?e 35, had been destroyed by a fire on September 15, 1927. The new space covered over 113,000 sq. ft (10,500 sq. meters) and used 20 large display cases. One of the first German television transmissions took place here during the 1930s. [edit]Use by the NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers' Party) In the early 1930s, the building was increasingly used by Nazi party members. In the mid-30s, the German Workers Front established offices for Gau Kurmark and became owners of the building in 1941. At the same time it became the central office for the SS. In 1943 the skylights were closed and the corresponding ridge turrets removed, so that French war prisoners could be held in the attic. During the Battle of Berlin the second cellar was flooded by the Nazis and remains underwater to day. The building was heavily damaged during World War II, though a large portion of the building survived intact. [edit]Use in the DDR In 1948 the building was taken over by the Free German Trade Union Federation (FDGB) and deteriorated over the course of the next several years. Various retailers and craft businesses temporarily moved into the ruins, especially on the Friedrichstra?e side. The German Travel Agency used the repaired passage section and several floors above ground. Among others, there was an artists' school, a technical school for foreign trade and economics, and office spaces for RTF (Rundfunk- und Fernmelde-Technik), a company dealing with radio and transmission technology. The cellar was used by the National People's Army. The movie theater Camera was located in the Friedrichstra?e gateway area, but was forced to leave in 1958 due to the worsening condition of the building. The presentation hall was dismantled, but was later reopened under the name OTL (Oranienburger Tor Lichtspiele). During the reconstruction work the facade was partially changed and a lobby area was built to house cash registers and checkout aisles. The roof was also rebuilt. This created the current entryway. The movie theater is still used today as a theater area, and after further reconstruction in 1972, it was renamed Camera. [edit]Demolition Though having suffered only moderate damage during the second World War, the building was slated to be demolished as a result of two engineering opinions from 1969 and 1977; it had not once been renovated, despite relatively continuous and intensive use. A new street was planned on the site and would have created a shortcut between Oranienburger Stra?e and Fri
STARCK BY WARENDORF
STARCK BY WARENDORF
The best things come in small packages: a compact version of the luxury kitchen that can be extended with additional modules. Externally mounted lights on the kitchen block emphasise the extravagant effect. Add the round table in bar counter height – a further reminder of the kitchen’s playful, baroque character. Shown: Primary in Luxe design with engraved, coloured mirror-backed glass. Trumpet table as a round bar-height table. Tall unit as supplementary module with niche clad in mirrored glass.

bar height round tables
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