ROUND FOLDING POKER TABLE. ROUND FOLDING

Round Folding Poker Table. Great Coffee Table Books.

Round Folding Poker Table


round folding poker table
    folding poker
  • In the game of poker, the play largely centers on the act of betting, and as such, a protocol has been developed to speed play, lessen confusion, and increase security while playing.
    round
  • Give a round shape to
  • Alter (a number) to one less exact but more convenient for calculations
  • wind around; move along a circular course; "round the bend"
  • a charge of ammunition for a single shot
  • from beginning to end; throughout; "It rains all year round on Skye"; "frigid weather the year around"
  • Pass and go around (something) so as to move on in a changed direction
    table
  • Postpone consideration of
  • postpone: hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"
  • a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs; "it was a sturdy table"
  • Present formally for discussion or consideration at a meeting
  • a set of data arranged in rows and columns; "see table 1"
round folding poker table - Fat Cat
Fat Cat 84-Inch Folding Poker Table
Fat Cat 84-Inch Folding Poker Table
Invite all your friends over for poker night with the Fat Cat Oval Folding Table Top. The tri-fold table top easily unfolds and fits perfectly onto any flat surface. The cushioned rail and green felt playing surface add a casino-style flair. Measuring 83.5 x 41.5 x 2 inches (L x W x H), the spacious table has up to ten player positions with built-in cup holders. It folds quickly for easy storage. You'll be dealing out the cards in no time.

The Fat Cat 64-2039 84-Inch Folding Poker Table is ideal for any poker party that needs to accommodate a large number of players. The green cloth playing surface is comfortable and level, and prevents chips and cards from unwanted shifting. The rail is cushioned for extra comfort, and also incorporates 10 built-in drink holders. The table's legs are collapsible, and the center of the table folds for easier storage. Overall, the table measures 84 x 42 x 30-1/4 inches (L x W x H) and provides plenty of surface area for any poker game.

77% (7)
My Pokerface
My Pokerface
Poker is a family of card games that share betting rules and usually (but not always) hand rankings. Poker games differ in how the cards are dealt, how hands may be formed, whether the high or low hand wins the pot in a showdown (in some games, the pot is split between the high and low hands), limits on bets and how many rounds of betting are allowed. In most modern poker games, the first round of betting begins with some form of forced bet. The action then proceeds to the left. Each player in turn must either match the maximum previous bet or fold, losing the amount bet so far and all further interest in the hand. A player who matches a bet may also raise, increasing the bet. The betting round ends when all players have either matched the last bet or folded. If all but one player fold on any round, the remaining player collects the pot without showing their hand. If more than one player remains in contention after the final betting round, the hands are shown and the winning hand takes the pot. With the exception of initial forced bets, money is only placed into the pot voluntarily by a player who, at least in theory, rationally believes the bet has positive expected value. Thus while the outcome of any particular hand is determined mostly by chance, the long-run expectations of the players are determined by their actions chosen based on probability and psychology. History The history is a matter of debate. One of the earliest known games to incorporate betting, hand rankings, and bluffing was the 15th century German game Pochspiel. Poker closely resembles the Persian game of As Nas, though there is no specific description of nas prior to 1890. In the 1937 edition of Foster's Complete Hoyle, R. F. Foster wrote: "the game of poker, as first played in the United States, five cards to each player from a twenty-card pack, is undoubtedly the Persian game of as nas." By 1990s some gaming historians including David Parlett started to challenge the notion that poker is a direct derivative of As Nas. There is evidence that a game called poque, a French game similar to poker, was played around the region where poker is said to have originated. The name of the game likely descended from the Irish Poca (Pron. Pokah) ('Pocket') or even the French poque, which descended from the German pochen ('to brag as a bluff' lit. 'to knock'). Yet it is not clear whether the origins of poker itself lie with the games bearing those names. It is commonly regarded as sharing ancestry with the Renaissance game of primero and the French brelan. The English game brag (earlier bragg) clearly descended from brelan and incorporated bluffing (though the concept was known in other games by that time). It is quite possible that all of these earlier games influenced the development of poker as it exists now. Harry Truman's poker chips A modern school of thought rejects these ancestries. They focus on the card play in poker, which is trivial and could have been derived from any number of games, or made up on general cardplay principles. The unique features of poker have to do with the betting, and do not appear in any known older game. In this view poker originated much earlier, in the early or mid-1700s, and spread throughout the Mississippi River region by 1800. It was played in a variety of forms, with 52 cards, and included both straight poker and stud. 20 card poker was a variant for two players (it is a common English practice to reduce the deck in card games when there are fewer players). The development of poker is linked to the historical movement that also saw the invention of commercial gambling. English actor Joseph Crowell reported that the game was played in New Orleans in 1829, with a deck of 20 cards and four players betting on which player's hand was the most valuable. Jonathan H. Green's book, An Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling (G. B. Zieber, Philadelphia, 1843), described the spread of the game from there to the rest of the country by Mississippi riverboats, on which gambling was a common pastime. As it spread north along the Mississippi River and to the West during the gold rush, it is thought to have become a part of the frontier pioneer ethos. Soon after this spread, the full 52-card English deck was used and the flush was introduced. The draw was added prior to 1850 (when it was first mentioned in print in a handbook of games). During the American Civil War, many additions were made including stud poker (the five-card variant), and the straight. Further American developments followed, such as the wild card (around 1875), lowball and split-pot poker (around 1900), and community card poker games (around 1925). The game and jargon of poker have become important parts of American culture and English culture. Such phrases and cliches as ace in the hole, ace up one's sleeve, beats me, blue chip, call one's bluff, cash in, high roller, pass the buck, poker face, stack up, up the ante, when the chips are
zane's iron horse lounge
zane's iron horse lounge
Cocktails Pool Smoking - at least that's what the other sign says. I haven't been in the place since it was the Horseshoe Club - about 25 years ago. My childhood friend, Mikey was a city cop back then. By "city" I mean the only city in the county, Sonora, population back then about 4,000. Mikey only weighed about 145 pounds but he was bigger than three of the four other cops at the time. There was one real big fat guy and there was the parking meter guy, who was technically not a "little person" I guess, but was only fractions of an inch this side of five feet. Then, there was his kid, known as the "Son of the Little Guy" and a petit, but spirited young lady. Those five, plus the chief and a couple of un-paid auxiliaries that only worked when the roundup or county fair was underway made up the city police force on the night I have in mind. On that night, this big old boy, a logger, was drunk and generally raising hell and breaking things down the street at Joe's Office--another one of the six or seven bars in town at the time. Mikey tells me when the call came in that night he was walking the beat with the young lady, while the Son of the LIttle Guy was manning the patrol car. It was night, so the parking meter guy and the chief were at home. And it happened that it was the day off for the one really big cop that Saturday night. Mikey gets the call on his portable, "415, no man on the way, Joe's Office." Mikey calls back, "what's up?" The dispatcher says "it's Frankie and he's at it again." She (the dispatcher) goes on to say, "the bartender wanted me to be sure to send the big cop, not any of those little ones. He kind of started to cry when I told him the big guy was off for the evening. And then he says, better send every one of them little cops you got! Frankie is tearing my place to pieces!" So, this big old boy Frankie, about 415 pounds and close to 7 feet tall, who's tearing up Joe's Office...now, he is generally sweet as punkin' pie, except when he gets drunk, which was fortunately not often. Well, he was deep in his cups this night, and was barely coherent. Mikey says when he and the young lady walked into the "Office", Frankie had one of those captain chairs and was swinging it around and around, generally bashing the hell out of the little stage they had for the band, and tearing up the round tables in the stage's vicinity. Well, the cops issued the expected orders in a good-faith attempt to restore order through reason. Frankie only wailed a little and like a whirlwind continued his rampage on in the direction of the bar. The bartender shrieked "STOP HIM!" The young lady withdrew her baton, and in an attempt to gain Frankie's attention, jabbed the end of the baton into his left kidney with what everybody agreed was an astonishing amount of force. At this he whimpered a little, then wheeled around to face her. Staring into the young lady's eyes, he took a half a step towards her. She immediately brought her baton up between his legs in a crushing blow to the groin. Well, if she didn't have his attention before, she did now. But, instead of folding over as might have been expected, he looked down, grabbed the baton, and bellowed "BITCH!" Snatching the baton from her two hands, he lifted it up, and before anyone had a chance to draw their sidearm, he tossed the club over his head and to the right, seriously damaging the juke box. Meanwhile, the Son of the Little Guy had arrived, and though he held no rank over the other two cops. took charge as he usually did, being the only officer on the force who had completed four years of P.O.S.T. training. The little guy says "watch this" and scales Frankie's left flank, stationing himself on the big man's hip and shoulder. He then commences beating the perp about the head with his night stick. Frankie wheels around spinning and bellowing like a brahma bull. The little guy yells for back up, whereupon the young lady climbs up on the right shoulder and attempts to choke him into submission. Mikey meanwhile, has climbed straight up his back, and holding on for dear life begins to beat the big man alternately about the head and neck. This concentrated and coordinated attack distresses Frankie almost to the point of panic. He wheels violently first one way, then the other, careening across the dance floor as what patrons remained in the bar dashed one way and the other to stay out of the group's way. Now, despite his best efforts, Frankie was unable to shake the officers off of his 27 acre body, for they were dedicated professional peace officers. He crashed them into the wall, the bar, and what was left of the juke box, all to no avail. The three little officers held on and continued flailing away at him in a sort of war of attrition. Panicked at this turn of events, Frankie decided his only hope would be esc

round folding poker table
round folding poker table
3 in 1 Texas Hold'em Table Top (Poker/Craps/Blackjack)
Looking for a table top for all types of casino games? This versatile texas hold'em table top is a great choice! Made of a high quality EVA material, this lightweight table top can be easily transported and comes with a carrying bag (included). What makes this table top stand out is the additional "covers" that are included with this table top. The standard table top is great for any type of poker game. Feel like playing blackjack or craps? Lay out the appropriate insert onto the table top! These inserts will stay tightly on and won't shift. * Opened Size: 63"x31.5"x0.78" * Closed Size: 15.8"x31.5"x3.15" * Poker, Blackjack and Craps * Built-in Chip and Beverage Holders * Hight quality casino style felt * 8 player position table top * Bonus carrying bag

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