BUILD A FOLDING TABLE - BUILD A

Build A Folding Table - Large Oval Dining Table

Build A Folding Table


build a folding table
    folding table
  • (Folding tables) A trestle table is an item of furniture comprising two or three trestle supports linked by a longitudinal cross-member over which a board or tabletop is placed.
  • A folding table is a table with legs that fold up against the table top. This is intended to make storage more convenient and to make the table more portable.
    build
  • Commission, finance, and oversee the building of (something)
  • build up: form or accumulate steadily; "Resistance to the manager's plan built up quickly"; "Pressure is building up at the Indian-Pakistani border"
  • Construct (something, typically something large) by putting parts or material together over a period of time
  • Incorporate (something) and make it a permanent part of a structure, system, or situation
  • construct: make by combining materials and parts; "this little pig made his house out of straw"; "Some eccentric constructed an electric brassiere warmer"
  • physique: constitution of the human body
build a folding table - Go Pong
Go Pong 8-Foot Portable Folding Beer Pong / Flip Cup Table
Go Pong 8-Foot Portable Folding Beer Pong / Flip Cup Table
The 8ft portable beer pong / flip cup table folds out from a compact briefcase size to 8' length so you can take them anywhere. Perfect for tailgating, house parties, bars, fraternities and more. Durable construction will withstand the test of time. Full regulation / tournament size.

Made of high-strength aluminum with a waterproof melamine MDF surface, the Go Pong 8-foot beer pong/flip cup table is built to withstand the rowdiest of parties. Because the party isn't always in the same place, the table folds up and is easily portable for convenience. Perfect for tailgating, house parties, bars, fraternities and more, the table is regulation tournament size with a classic design that allows for easy customization. It folds down into a two foot by two feet briefcase with carry handles for ease of transportation and storage.
Features:
Durable melamine MDF waterproof surface
Regulation tournament size
Classic design allows for easy customization
Simplistic design for easy customization
High-strength aluminum frame
Waterproof MDF surface
Regulation tournament size; 8 foot design
Dimensionspen: 8 feet by 2 feet by 27.5 inches (L x W x H)
Dimensions Closed: 2 feet by 5.5 inches by 2 feet (L x W x H)
Weight: 25 pounds

78% (11)
U.S. Realty Building
U.S. Realty Building
Financial District, Lower Manhattan The U.S. Realty Building, designed by Francis Hatch Kimball and built in 1907, is among the first Gothic-inspired skyscrapers in New York. Kimball's sensitive adaptation of this historical style established a sympathetic relationship between the earlier Trinity Building and its neighbor, Trinity Church, which is continued in the design of the U.S. Realty Building. An entirely freestanding, steel-framed structure, the U.S. Realty Building, like its near twin, the Trinity Building, anticipates the skyscraper "cathedral" tcwer type which emerged a few years later—of which the Wool worth Building is the most notable example. The spire of Trinity (hurch, the picturesque rooflines of the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, and the Wool worth Building twer form a romantic ensemble and create a striking, Gothic silhouette on Lower Broadway. Kimball, who had worked with the English Victorian Gothicist William Burges, had won acclaim as a designer of theaters and churches before receiving several important skyscraper commissions at the turn of the century; these tall buildings are known for their important innovations in the technology of caisson foundations. His strong predilection for Gothic design and his engineering expertise made Kimball the ideal architect of for the U.S. Realty Building commission. Development of Lower Manhattan Since the seventeenth century, Lower Manhattan has been New York's center of commerce and finance. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, many major American businesses had established headquarters there, and by the early twentieth century, the skyline of lower Manhattan had been dramatically transformed as the early skyscrapers appeared. The advancement of elevator technology and new developments in structural engineering allowed architects to construct tall, spacious, and efficient office buildings, suited to the narrow sites of the island. In the 1880s and 1890s, Broadway became the main artery of the district. Insurance companies, conscious of their public images, were among the first to erect structures celebrating their wealth and prosperity. In 1898, the five boroughs were consolidated into Greater New York, awakening a strong awareness of the city's history and a sense of civic pride on the part of the general public. At this time, there was also a growing mistrust of monopolies and big business practices were severely criticized. Large corporations attempted to counter such sentiments by erecting buildings that would give an impression of not merely financial stability but of trustworthiness, tradition, and integrity, in order to imply that big business served the needs of the public. As this new building type emerged, so did the need for appropriate stylistic and compositional expression. Architects found solutions in a variety of historical styles, but none was more pervasive than classicism. The classical, tripartite division of the elevation into a base, a shaft, and a capital was widely accepted, in part because it could accommodate the large proportions of skyscrapers; the neo-Classical style was commonly employed for civic architecture, thus providing, by association, a positive image for the corporation. The Neo-Gothic Style Although the Gothic Revival was influential in the United States during the nineteenth century, the style was rarely employed for commercial architecture and early skyscraper designs. Contemporary architectural criticism focused on the notion that no single historical style could accommodate the variety of building types demanded by modem life, and until "a distinct system of architectural forms appropriate to our age and civilization" was found, historical styles should co-exist. Despite the acceptance of stylistic variation, Gothic was generally not considered to be relevant to the design of office buildings, prior to the erection of the Woolworth Building, (Cass Gilbert, 1911-13, a designated New York City Landmark). Although few, the early, Gothic-inspired skyscrapers were massive, stylistically innovative structures which proved to have a great impact on Manhattan's skyline. In addition to the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, other outstanding examples of Neo-Gothic skyscraper design are Gilbert's West Street Building, (1905); Kimball's enormous City Investing Building, (1908, demolished); and the Liberty Tower by Henry Ives Cobb, (1909, a designated New York City landmark). The subjective connotations of the Gothic style—spirituality, scholasticism, fraternity, craftsmanship—seem to have little to do with an architecture of capitalism. As the "Commercial Gothic" developed, however, critics made formal, stylistic comparisons between the verticality and thrust of Gothic cathedrals, (particularly their spires), and skyscrapers. Due to their location next to Trinity Church, a sense of place and the picturesque qualities of the Gothic style were decisive factors i
U. S. Realty Building
U. S. Realty Building
Financial District, Lower Manhattan The U.S. Realty Building, designed by Francis Hatch Kimball and built in 1907, is among the first Gothic-inspired skyscrapers in New York. Kimball's sensitive adaptation of this historical style established a sympathetic relationship between the earlier Trinity Building and its neighbor, Trinity Church, which is continued in the design of the U.S. Realty Building. An entirely freestanding, steel-framed structure, the U.S. Realty Building, like its near twin, the Trinity Building, anticipates the skyscraper "cathedral" tower type which emerged a few years later—of which the Wool worth Building is the most notable example. The spire of Trinity (hurch, the picturesque rooflines of the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, and the Wool worth Building twer form a romantic ensemble and create a striking, Gothic silhouette on Lower Broadway. Kimball, who had worked with the English Victorian Gothicist William Burges, had won acclaim as a designer of theaters and churches before receiving several important skyscraper commissions at the turn of the century; these tall buildings are known for their important innovations in the technology of caisson foundations. His strong predilection for Gothic design and his engineering expertise made Kimball the ideal architect of for the U.S. Realty Building commission. Development of Lower Manhattan Since the seventeenth century, Lower Manhattan has been New York's center of commerce and finance. By the last decades of the nineteenth century, many major American businesses had established headquarters there, and by the early twentieth century, the skyline of lower Manhattan had been dramatically transformed as the early skyscrapers appeared. The advancement of elevator technology and new developments in structural engineering allowed architects to construct tall, spacious, and efficient office buildings, suited to the narrow sites of the island. In the 1880s and 1890s, Broadway became the main artery of the district. Insurance companies, conscious of their public images, were among the first to erect structures celebrating their wealth and prosperity. In 1898, the five boroughs were consolidated into Greater New York, awakening a strong awareness of the city's history and a sense of civic pride on the part of the general public. At this time, there was also a growing mistrust of monopolies and big business practices were severely criticized. Large corporations attempted to counter such sentiments by erecting buildings that would give an impression of not merely financial stability but of trustworthiness, tradition, and integrity, in order to imply that big business served the needs of the public. As this new building type emerged, so did the need for appropriate stylistic and compositional expression. Architects found solutions in a variety of historical styles, but none was more pervasive than classicism. The classical, tripartite division of the elevation into a base, a shaft, and a capital was widely accepted, in part because it could accommodate the large proportions of skyscrapers; the neo-Classical style was commonly employed for civic architecture, thus providing, by association, a positive image for the corporation. The Neo-Gothic Style Although the Gothic Revival was influential in the United States during the nineteenth century, the style was rarely employed for commercial architecture and early skyscraper designs. Contemporary architectural criticism focused on the notion that no single historical style could accommodate the variety of building types demanded by modem life, and until "a distinct system of architectural forms appropriate to our age and civilization" was found, historical styles should co-exist. Despite the acceptance of stylistic variation, Gothic was generally not considered to be relevant to the design of office buildings, prior to the erection of the Woolworth Building, (Cass Gilbert, 1911-13, a designated New York City Landmark). Although few, the early, Gothic-inspired skyscrapers were massive, stylistically innovative structures which proved to have a great impact on Manhattan's skyline. In addition to the Trinity and U.S. Realty Buildings, other outstanding examples of Neo-Gothic skyscraper design are Gilbert's West Street Building, (1905); Kimball's enormous City Investing Building, (1908, demolished); and the Liberty Tower by Henry Ives Cobb, (1909, a designated New York City landmark). The subjective connotations of the Gothic style—spirituality, scholasticism, fraternity, craftsmanship—seem to have little to do with an architecture of capitalism. As the "Commercial Gothic" developed, however, critics made formal, stylistic comparisons between the verticality and thrust of Gothic cathedrals, (particularly their spires), and skyscrapers. Due to their location next to Trinity Church, a sense of place and the picturesque qualities of the Gothic style were decisive factors

build a folding table
build a folding table
Mega Bloks Play 'n Go Table
Mega Bloks Play'n Go Table
Bright, bold and bountiful, the Play 'n Go Table is a 3-in-1 construction marvel and the ultimate toy for home and school fun! This Play 'n Go Table can be brought everywhere and unfolds in a snap, acting as a building platform and practical storage container. From a multi-story house with garage area, to secret passageways and spectacular arches, let your kid’s creativity unfold as they build an entire town on the portable table! Encourage them to build and rebuild in different fashions!

Product Measures: 24.00 X 16.00 X 5.25
Recommended Ages: 1 year - 6 years

With the MEGA Bloks Build'n Go Table, your child will spend hours building unlimited combinations of structures. There is storage for MEGA Bloks inside the table and it folds into a convenient, portable case. Recommended for children over the age of one, the MEGA Bloks Build'n Go Table handy three-in-one feature is the ultimate in convenience for parents.

Play 'N Go Table
Ages: 1+

Pieces: 22 pieces




What We Think

Fun factor:
Durability:
Ease of assembly:
Educational factor:
Novelty factor:

The Good: 3-in-1 table is lightweight and durable for years of use.

The Challenging: We wish it came with a few more pieces.

In a Nutshell: Bold, interesting shapes to build with for endless possibilities and hours of enjoyment.






A colorful and fun building toy, MEGA Bloks will teach your child engineering and problem solving skills. View larger.


This set comes with 22 versatile MEGA Blok pieces. View larger.

Bright, Colorful Pieces for Endless Enjoyment
The colorful, bright building pieces are durable and made to last. Build castles or create a small city block; your child will find many different ways to use the pieces. The set includes twenty-two MEGA Bloks pieces such as blocks, bridges, a car, and a boy. There's even a sticker sheet so kids can decorate the blocks with pictures like soccer balls and letters.
The smallest piece in the set is over two inches tall and an inch wide, so none of the pieces pose a choking hazard.
One tip for parents: add the MEGA Bloks Building Imagination Bag (sold separately) with additional pieces for even more combinations and possibilities.
Just Fold and Go
The MEGA Bloks Build'n Go Table is easy to set up. Simply place the four, colorful tabletop pieces in place and twist the center wheel to lock. Then unfold the legs until you hear a click. There's a handy storage compartment underneath the tabletop that can hold MEGA Bloks pieces for fast, easy clean up.
It's also easy to prepare the table to get ready to go. You simply pinch the top of each leg until the leg folds down. The lightweight table has two handles on the side so you can carry it like a compact suitcase. It's light enough for children to tote it around. Portable and easy to carry, it's perfect for play dates or a trip to Grandma's house.
What's in the Box
One MEGA Blok foldable table, four interlocking table top pieces, 22 MEGA Blok shapes and pieces of varying sizes, one page of stickers, instruction sheet.

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