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Narrow Pub Table


narrow pub table
    pub table
  • Any table that is 42" High (Standard Table height is 30")
    narrow
  • A narrow channel connecting two larger areas of water
  • not wide; "a narrow bridge"; "a narrow line across the page"
  • make or become more narrow or restricted; "The selection was narrowed"; "The road narrowed"
  • a narrow strait connecting two bodies of water

The Seven Stars Thomas Lane Bristol BS1
The Seven Stars Thomas Lane Bristol BS1
The Seven Stars - Thomas Lane - Tucked away between the 'Fleece', and the new office developments, this is a vibrant pub with no little character. As you enter, there is a gas fire heating the laid back lounge area to your right, and a very popular redder-than-red pool table beyond the bar. Children are welcome during the day. This inn lies in the shadow of St Thomas Church, tucked away in Thomas Lane. It is probably a late eighteenth century purpose built inn and is typical of many small, town inns. The original hostelry would have possessed an extensive yard but today there is only a narrow cobbled passage-way. The approach is still of some interest, however, as the pavement preserves the iron-bound edges to prevent damage by iron cart-wheels, which are unique to Bristol There is also a nice old lamp-post to set the scene for this listed building. There has been little change externally in this inn since its erection apart from the introduction of some sash windows at the side, but this unpretentious dock-side inn has played an important part in our country’s history. It was in the Seven Stars that the Reverend Thomas Clarkson met Landlord Thompson in 1787 and began to collect the evidence which enabled his friend William Wilberforce to carry out his act for the Abolition of Slavery.Thomas Clarkson 1760-1846. The anti-slavery campaigner Thomas Clarkson visited Bristol in 1787. He talked to sailors and local people about the slave trade, hearing horror stories about the slaving voyages that left Bristol. It was probably in the Seven Stars public house in Thomas Lane that the sailor John Dean, a free black man, told about his torture on board a slave ship. Other black residents of Bristol hoped to help their fellow men in other ways. James Martin of Bristol, for example, was a former slave. He died in 1813 or 1814, and left money in his will to the African Institution in London. This was a Christian foundation set up to undertake work in Africa to spread the word of God. Clarkson wrote in his Journal, 'I was determined to inquire into the truth of the reports that seamen had an aversion to enter, and that they were inveigled, if not often forced, into this hateful employment. For this purpose I was introduced to a landlord of the name of Thompson who kept a public house called Seven Stars. He was a very intelligent man, well accustomed to receive sailors when discharged at the end of their voyages, and to board them till their vessels went out again, or to find them berths in others'. Clarkson blackened his face like a miner and listened to the stories told by these sailors, of the atrocities committed in the slave trade. He was successful and gave all the credit to his landlord friend. 'I perceived in a little time the advantage of having cultivated an acquaintance with Thompson of the Seven Stars. For nothing could now pass in Bristol relative to the seamen employed in this trade, but it was soon brought to me.' Landlord Thompson may have gone, but the present landlord, Arthur Bishop, is well able to tell stories about the inn and its regulars as he pulls a pint of John Courage, though not from one of the original barrels which he made for the firm when he was a fully trained cooper. Clarkson’s visit of course has left its legend of stories to be told, there is a recently bricked-up window in the bar through which he was supposed to have seen the slaves actually being sold. The historian feels the need to point out that there is no evidence whatsoever that Clarkson, or anyone else, actually saw any slaves being sold in Bristol; such transactions were all done on paper and slaves were transported directly from Africa to Jamaica, bought with trade goods supplied by Bristol. You can enjoy the legends if you wish for with the seagulls flying overhead the links with the sea are all too obvious and you can believe what you want to believe. The Seven Stars is in St Thomas Parish, at one time one of the most thriving parishes in the city. In fact, the first church of St Thomas the Martyr was second only to the beautiful St Mary Redcliffe and when it was rebuilt in 1787 the gothic tower was kept. James Allen, who lived nearby in St Thomas Street, designed the new church and Matthew’s Directory for 1793 describes him as 'an architect and statuary'. To the right of the church is a group of houses which, though bearing the date 1456, are of early seventeenth century style. This little group is the last of many such houses which once lined this busy street. The first of the houses nearest the Bridge was also licensed as an inn in the eighteenth century, just one of the seventeen inns which Matthews listed in this street. St Thomas Street was without doubt an important thoroughfare and some notable events and celebrations took place there. Matthews again tells us there was, 'a market every Thursday for horses, pigs and living cattle, the Smithfield of Bristol.' There must have been many thirsty Br
The Beer Cask Pennywell Road
The Beer Cask Pennywell Road
Memories of Reg Hobbs BEER CASK Pennywell Road Bristol Reg Hobbs, whose father was Charlie (of Beer Cask fame) boxed as a featherweight himself. He had a fine record as an amateur and was one of three boxers chosen by Fred Dyer — a Welsh man with a fine baritone voice and a sound record as a handler of boxers — to form a small stable in London. Fellow Bristolian George Rose and Midlander Bert Kirby were the others who went. Reg won about three-quarters of his fights; he had a good left hand and was a skilful counter-puncher, talented enough to be matched against two Welsh champions. Nowadays he lives in Kingswood where his hobbies include classical music and “the avid reading of books on history”. Dad began as a boot-maker and then ran the Beer Cask for nearly 40 years. He loved boxing and was actually co-promoting Harry Mansfield at a Park Street venue in the early days. That’s really going back. I looked on him as a great benefactor for the sport. He filled a void, turning an old shed at the back of the pub into a gym. So many including some champions came there to train — or just to watch. And there was Bob Wade, of course, ‘a wonderful teacher en masse. No-one ever paid anything for lights or anything like that. Dad was just happy to keep boxing going. I suppose I fought ten times or so at the Drill Hall, Old Market. As an amateur I’d often been paired with George Rose and then, as a pro, I beat him. I drew with him after that. Some at the ringside thought I’d beaten Rose again but not Kid Lewis the ref. George, Bert Kirby — who was to become flyweight champion of Britain — and I lodged together in London, when Fred Dyer took us in charge. He was a bit of a fanatic about diet, I remember. Insisted on special food for us. I used to train at the old National Sporting Club, a remarkable institution. It had a very Bohemian atmosphere. Big money was always changing hands during the fights there. I met and talked to many of the most brilliant boxers of the day during that period. Four times I fought at The Ring, Blackfriars — also the popular Premierland and Lime Grove Baths, Shepherds Bush. At Hackney, the ring was so small that the spectators were right up against the ropes. I got hit very low there by Billy Mack, fighting on his home ground. He should have been disqualified, of course. But instead, the referee decided to give me a minute’s rest. What do you think of that? The most vivid memories for me are of the early days at the unlicensed shows. I once topped the bill at Yeovil and got 30 bob for it. An army champion’s opponent didn’t turn up and I was roped in. I knocked him out in the 2nd round. But I could be sent anywhere to fight at almost a moment’s notice. Chard... Gloucester... Shepton Mallet... Bridgwater.. . Cheltenham... You didn’t even know who you were fighting. No such thing as contracts - and weights didn’t matter. It wasn’t unusual to end up taking on a bloke two stone heavier. By the time I’d reached 30, I’d become a manager. I looked after Frank McAvoy and Jack Haskins. Frank did become Southern Central welterweight champion but I always felt he had the ability to go further. Jack, a fine rugby player, of course, was a great big mountain of a man without an ounce of fat on him. He was so big he could just push his opponents over. Prince-Cox had this great idea of putting one rugby man on against another, ‘Digger’ Morris, at Gloucester, a typical gimmick. Jack won, by the way. Looking back on my own career, I feel I developed a ‘sixth sense’ with my left hand. But, of course, you didn’t learn the trade at venues like Chard and Shepton Mallet — you needed to go to London. These days I’m happiest of all sitting at home listening to my Chopin and Beethoven records. Yet I can still nostalgically hear Fred Dyer’s lovely Welsh voice.., can still remember the suppers we were given after fighting as amateurs at the United Services Club in Narrow Wine Street or the Drill Hall... can still see Dad sitting in his corner seat at the Arcade, along with engine driver Bill Brewer, offering advice to the contestants! Oh dear, what warm memories. BEER CASK Pennywell Road 189 Pennywell Road, the Beer Cask was demolished in the early 1960’s. 1866. F. Puddy / 1867 - 69. William Slee / 1871 - 72. Henry Miles / 1874 - 75. Mrs. Miles / 1877. J. Brain - 1878. S. Mountain / 1879. Augustus Lyson / 1883. John Olley / 1885. James Harvey / 1886. Francis Biggs - 1887. John Morgan / 1889. Robert Hicks / 1891 - 1901. Edwin Fry / 1904. Mary Howell / 1909. Harry Taylor - 1914. Frederick Hurley / 1915. Stephen Lush Hobbs / 1916 to 1950. Charles Hobbs / 1950 - 56. Thomas Pippin. During the time he was licensee at the Beer Cask, Pennywell Road, Mr. Hobbs trained in his own gymnasium nearly all the leading Bristol boxers of the time, including Bert Kirby, flyweight champion of England in 1930. He took over at the East Street Tavern about 1900* and after six years there, moved to the

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