LIGHT OAK KITCHEN TABLE : LIGHT OAK

Light Oak Kitchen Table : High End Table Lamps.

Light Oak Kitchen Table


light oak kitchen table
    kitchen table
  • a table in the kitchen
  • A kitchen is a room or part of a room used for cooking and food preparation.
    light oak
  • Light Oak is a census-designated place (CDP) in Cleveland County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 779 at the 2000 census.
light oak kitchen table - Winsome Wood
Winsome Wood Wine Cart with Drawer, Light Oak
Winsome Wood Wine Cart with Drawer, Light Oak
A compact rolling wine station of solid Beachwood, Handy drawer holds opener, corks accessories, etc. Hanging glass storage under the drawer and room for 9 bottles of wine.

Let the party travel through the house--Winsome Wood's rolling wine cart will go right along with it. A perfect place to stow all kinds of grape-inspired goods, this small, portable unit features a square countertop for serving, a deep storage drawer, a 12-glass hanging rack, and a 9-bottle wine rack. The solid beechwood construction is naturally strong and a light oak finish adds a warm, lustrous glow. Designed with simplicity in mind, the cart looks fresh and clean in any decor--keeping the focus on the delicious nectars where it belongs. It measures 15-1/4 inches in diameter by 33 inches high; assembly is required. --Kara Karll

80% (5)
Corbin-Norton House, Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard
Corbin-Norton House, Oak Bluffs, Martha's Vineyard
AT HOME WITH PETER NORTON AND GWEN ADAMS BY LAURA D. ROOSEVELT The Russian inscription (written in Cyrillic) over the front door of 87 Ocean Avenue in Oak Bluffs translates to “Dacha Peterhof” — Peter’s summer house. The grand paragon of Queen Anne—style architecture is in fact the home of Peter Norton, computer–software publisher, author, and philanthropist. Even though Peter says, “You can’t think of [the house] as having an owner, but rather a custodian,” if anyone deserves to lay claim to it, he does; this is the house that Peter built — not once, but twice. “The house was an ugly wreck when I bought it in the early 1990s,” says Peter. “It was calling out for someone to fix it up.” Answering the call, he hired Christopher Dallmus of Design Associates (a Cambridge, Massachusetts, based architecture firm specializing in historic preservation) to oversee a soup–to–nuts restoration project that took several years. Then, in February of 2001, in a memorable blaze caused by a single faulty wire deep inside a wall, the house burned to the ground. “I was at a board meeting of a theater company in New York when I got a call saying, ‘Your house is burning down,’” Peter recalls. “I was devastated. I was clinging to the house as a psychological prop. My marriage had failed the year before, and then the house burned down. Sometimes the second blow is what hurts you the most.” Nevertheless, he decided to rebuild. He could have started from scratch and designed a completely different dwelling, but instead, he rehired the same team of architects and builders and began constructing an exact replica of the house they’d finished renovating only a few years earlier. The exhaustive research and attention to detail involved in the original renovation came in handy during reconstruction. Hours had been spent at the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, unearthing old photographs that showed what the house had looked like when originally built in 1891. And the carpenters who worked on the renovation did what Peter calls “forensic archeology” — they took the building apart board by board in order to learn as much as they could about the original. “It was like an autopsy,” he remarks. Much of the house was completely rebuilt the first time around. “Except for two pillars, there wasn’t a stick of wood that was original” on the exterior, Peter says. “Yet people would say, ‘It’s great to see that old house in such good condition.’” Now it stands again, in equally good condition, a near perfect replica of a nearly exact restoration of the original late–nineteenth–century home. “There are layers of contradiction here,” notes Peter. “It’s not an historic house; it replaces an identical, restored historic house that was here before. So which way do you look at it — is it real, or is it phony?” Phony or real, it is magnificent — a grande dame of a house, made up in three shades of green plus a couple of browns, bejeweled in fanciful molding, and sumptuously curved from her rounded entry steps to her turreted top. Even in a town full of multi–colored gingerbread houses, this house stands out, and strangers are drawn to it. Peter keeps a dry–erase board on his front porch, and during the summer, when he’s sitting outside, he makes a mark for every time a passerby makes a comment or asks a question about the house. By the end of the day, the board is often nearly full. Some strangers have even mistaken the house for an inn, which is why one of the curved entry steps up to the porch now bears the words, “A Private Home.” On more than one occasion, Peter and his fiancee Gwen Adams have found unknown people waiting on the front porch or in their living room, looking for the concierge. “You have to have a sense of humor,” says Gwen. “I’m considering buying a credit card imprinting machine for the front hall.” One reason why the house stands out is that, despite its many exterior paint colors and gingerbread–like molding, it differs from its neighbors. The Queen Anne–style architecture is darker and somewhat heavier than that of the cottages. “It’s an urban house that’s been plonked down in a summer resort,” Peter says. “It doesn’t fit the paradigm of the light, frilly, joyful architecture of the town. It’s not a summer house to the eyes, but people forgive that because it’s so beautiful.” To counteract the house’s relatively serious feeling, Peter has tried to add frivolity here and there. In his backyard, for example, he built a fanciful Chinese gazebo, painted in the same colors as the house. To the Russian inscription on the house’s facade, he’s considering adding one in Greek saying, “If you’d studied Greek, you could read this.” While the house is different from its neighbors in many respects, Peter notes that in a few subtle architectural ways, it “tips its hat to and salutes” the Camp Ground. For example, the central double doors on the front of the house don’t belong in a typical Queen Anne, but here, they mimic the double doors of man
Pine Pub Table
Pine Pub Table
1x12 pine boards edge glued for the top. the frame is all leftover 2x4's ripped down and stained all red mahogany. little wobbly because it is light. if i do this again, i'll do it in oak and widen the base.

light oak kitchen table
light oak kitchen table
Iceberg 65129 72 by 30 by 29-Inch Indestruc-Tables Too Rectangular Folding Table, Light Oak
Strong, sturdy, lightweight and portable Durable blow-molded, high-density polyethylene top Holds 1,500-Pound Evenly distributed Black colored edge is dent and scratch-resistant Woodgrain inlay provides smooth writing surface and is 1/8-Inch undersized to prevent buckling Integral base design features powder coated oval legs for greater structural strength, scratch-resistance and improved appearance Tables have a stacking detail which allows the units to nest when stacked for storage Width: 72-Inch Depth: 30-Inch Diameter: N\A; Height: N\A

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