The Assumptions

Thoughts on the case as offered by the prosecution and the media


Summary of the case

A pregnant woman vanishes from her home without a trace of a crime. Later, her badly decomposed body is found on the shore of the bay. Her uterus has been cut open and there is no trace of the fetus or the placenta. The baby is found, with no signs of pre-maturity and not in the fetal position, on a different part of the shore. There is no sign he was ever in the sea. What part of this doesn't scream 'failed fetus napping'?

Despite a desperate search by the police not a trace of any evidence linking her husband to the crime can be found, and the prosecution is forced to resort to extreme efforts to spin what little they can find into a case against the husband. They play recorded telephone conversations between the husband and a woman he had sex with 3 or 4 times in an effort to blacken his reputation, although nowhere in these calls does he ever make the slightest admission of guilt or anything approaching it.

Although it is clear that there is a total lack of credible evidence of guilt he is convicted, mainly on the strength of these intimate conversations.


Unproven assumptions needed to believe the prosecution case. Each of these has been stated or implied by the prosecution, the police, the media or the public and conclusions of guilt have been drawn from them. Unless they can be proven the case against Scott Peterson must fail – and his conviction must therefore be based on prejudice and on prejudice alone.

Assumption 1:

 Scott would decide he didn't want a wife or child after moving to Modesto to be closer to Laci's family.

Assumption 2:

 Scott would decide he didn't want a wife or child after going to extreme lengths to get Laci pregnant including running home and taking Viagra when called for sex.

Assumption 3:

 Scott would decide he didn't want a wife or child after crafting a bedroom for his new son with his own hands.

Assumption 4:

 Scott would decide he didn't want a child although he was prepared to pay for Laci's fertility treatments out of his own pocket.

Assumption 5:

 Scott would decide to murder Laci before getting his hands on her inheritance.

Assumption 6:

 Purchasing a life insurance policy for Laci means Scott is guilty even though it was purchased well before her abduction.

Assumption 7:

 Purchasing a life insurance policy for Laci means Scott is guilty even though it was she who insisted on the larger amount chosen.

Assumption 8:

 Scott would be capable of committing homicide even though he is extremely law abiding and has never hit another human.

Assumption 9:

 Scott would be capable of committing homicide even though he is extremely law abiding and has never even received a traffic ticket.

Assumption 10:

 Scott would be capable of committing homicide even though everyone who knew him (including the Rochas before the police lied to them) said he couldn't possibly do something like that.

Assumption 11:

 Scott would decide to start, or to not end, a sexual relationship at the same time he was planning to kill his wife even though he knew it would make him look guilty and even though it actually got him convicted.

Assumption 12:

 Scott's sexual relationship means he is guilty even though 70% (or more) of married men (and almost as many women) commit adultery.

Assumption 13:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though almost every married man who commits adultery lies about it to his wife, family and friends.

Assumption 14:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though 100% of married men who commit adultery while lying to the other woman about their marital status by definition tell lies.

Assumption 15:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though when President Bill Clinton was caught in a sexual relationship he lied about it until the blue dress showed he was lying.

Assumption 16:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though when Frank Gifford was caught in sexual relationship he lied about it until video tape showed he was lying.

Assumption 17:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though when Kobe Bryant was caught he lied about it until the underwear evidence showed he was lying.

Assumption 18:

 Scott's lies about his sexual relationship mean he is guilty even though when Ted Haggard was accused of an illicit gay relationship he lied about it until he admitted he was lying.

Assumption 19:

 Scott's lies about being in Paris prove he is guilty even though most men who are dumping a woman will tell some sort of lie to make themselves seem better or to hurt the woman less.

Assumption 20:

 Scott's letting Frey think he was widowed proves he is guilty even though another male lover told Frey that exact thing and that man's wife is still alive.

Assumption 21:

 Scott having an affair when he was married to a pretty woman like Laci proves he would kill her even though Christie Brinkley's husband also cheated on her.

Assumption 22:

 Scott having an affair when he was married to a pretty woman like Laci proves he would kill her even though Halle Berry's husband also cheated on her.

Assumption 23:

 Scott could pick up Laci's body and move it unaided, first to the truck then from the truck into the boat then from the boat into the water. He would not need the help of one to three more people to do this although no proof was ever offered that he (or anyone) could do this.

Assumption 24:

 Scott would buy a tiny boat to use to dump the body in a shallow bay instead of renting a cabin cruiser and dumping the body in deep water out of sight of land where it would never be found.

Assumption 25:

 Scott's purchase of the boat proves he is guilty although this was the fourth boat Scott had owned in his adult life.

Assumption 26:

 Scott's purchase of the boat proves he is guilty because it was too small to land sturgeon even though these can weigh as little as 35 lbs.

Assumption 27:

 Scott's purchase of the boat proves he is guilty because it was too small to land sturgeon even though one man caught a very large spearfish in a 7 foot inflatable kayak while way out in the ocean (as shown on TV).

Assumption 28:

 Scott buying a temporary fishing license proves he is guilty although in December that is the only license you can buy and although Scott had a history of purchasing temporary fishing licenses.

Assumption 29:

 Scott could safely dump the body from a tiny boat even though no proof was offered that this was possible to do and no other cases were mentioned where that was successfully done by anyone at any time.

Assumption 30:

 Scott would fail to keep the boat purchase a secret and would store it in his warehouse where Laci would meet him and where others, including the police, could easily see it.

Assumption 31:

 Detective Brocchini deleting from his report the information that the Laci had been seen at Scott's warehouse after he stored the boat there is perfectly normal and no reason to be suspicious of the police even though the information went to Scott's innocence.

Assumption 32:

 The MPD lost the tape in which a criminal admits to another that Laci "walked up on them" as they were robbing the Medina home on the 24th but it is normal for police to lose evidence all the time.

Assumption 33:

 The MPD lost the record sheet regarding the tape in which a criminal admits to another that Laci "walked up on them" as they were robbing the Medina home on the 24th but it is normal for police to lose evidence all the time.

Assumption 34:

 Scott would make weights ahead of time even though there is no record that anyone has ever done this (tales of 'cement overshoes' appear to be myth).

Assumption 35:

 Scott would make weights ahead of time even though keeping and using one which matched the others would be proof of guilt.

Assumption 36:

 Scott would make weights ahead of time even though cement blocks are much easier to use and require no time to make. Two blocks would weigh 48 lb or more (50% more than the four alleged weights).

Assumption 37:

 Scott would not put a $1 drop cloth, or plastic bags, or newspapers on the flat bed where he made the weights to easily dispose of the mess that could be and was used against him.

Assumption 38:

 Scott would make the weights one after another and would use a different spot each time instead of using the same spot or overlapping them. He could have poured water in the entire bag and made one large weight much more easily than the prosecution's peculiar theory.

Assumption 39:

 Scott would not research how much weight is needed to keep a body down.

Assumption 40:

 Scott's guess as to the weight would be exactly the right weight to keep that body down.

Assumption 41:

 Scott would do no research on body disposal or weights required and yet the body would not be found despite an extensive and expensive search.

Assumption 42:

 Even though experience shows that 350 lb of weight would be needed to keep the body down and this much would overload and sink his boat in this case it wouldn't for reasons unknown.

Assumption 43:

 Even though experience shows that 350 lb of weight would be needed to keep the body down the 32 lb he was assumed to have used would worked just as well for reasons unknown.

Assumption 44:

 Scott would not use a deep lake close to home even though a body sinks deeper in fresh water and deep water will keep a body down.

Assumption 45:

 Scott would not dump the body off a bridge into a lake even though no boat would be needed.

Assumption 46:

 Scott would not bury the body many miles away from the bay even though he could have driven to Nevada and back overnight.

Assumption 47:

 Scott would wait until very late in the pregnancy to commit the crime.

Assumption 48:

 Scott would choose a day for murder just before Christmas when they were going to her parents for dinner.

Assumption 49:

 Scott would choose to kill during the Christmas season when people were likely to drop by.

Assumption 50:

 Scott would invite Amy Rocha over for pizza the night he planned to kill Laci and he killed Laci that night or next morning.

Assumption 51:

 Scott would agree to pick up a basket for another family member on the day he supposedly also intended to dump the body.

Assumption 52:

 Scott must be guilty although people who saw him at the bay noted nothing suspicious.

Assumption 53:

 Scott could kill Laci and not leave any trace of it in the house.

Assumption 54:

 A burglary would happen right across the street from Laci on the day she vanished but there would be no connection.

Assumption 55:

 Scott being away at the bay when Laci was abducted is too much of a coincidence so it proves him guilty even though if Scott was home that day Laci could have had him investigate the burglary at the Medina home.

Assumption 56:

 The burglars Todd and Pearce could not have been involved in Laci's abduction even though they faced prison sentences so long for the burglary that they were virtual life sentences (35 or more to life).

Assumption 57:

 Laci could not have been assaulted and abducted from the Medina home even though the small bedroom was mysteriously trashed.

Assumption 58:

 Laci could not have been assaulted and abducted from the Medina home even though she would have walked past it on her way to and from the park.

Assumption 59:

 Laci could not have been assaulted and abducted from the Medina home even though she was well known to watch out for suspicious activities in her neighbourhood.

Assumption 60:

 The prosecutors would let the burglars off with a slap on the wrist (instead of 50 years to life) after the burglars agreed that the burglary took place on the 27th (and later the 26th) and not the 24th when a citizen reported seeing it but that was quite normal and not at all suspicious.

Assumption 61:

 While the trial was going on, and after the defence had requested it be turned over for testing, the police would destroy the safe from the burglary instead of letting it be tested but that was perfectly normal and not at all suspicious.

Assumption 62:

 The burglary was done in daytime on the 26th (originally claimed on the 27th) to get money for Christmas but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 63:

 The burglary was done in daytime on the 26th when all of the media and police were around but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 64:

 The burglars originally claimed that the burglary was done in daytime on the 27th on the day when the home owners returned and reported the crime but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 65:

 Laci would vanish along with a Croton watch and a Croton watch would be pawned a few days later in a striking coincidence but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 66:

 Laci would vanish along with some diamond earrings which were never found but that was not suspicious - but matching earrings would be sold in Oakland.

Assumption 67:

 After several attempts Karen Servas would come up with a time line which proved that only Scott could have abducted Laci but the prosecution could not explain how it proved this, they would just say that it did.

Assumption 68:

 Scott would think to put the curling iron out as a clue although it is not clear what that meant or was supposed to mean.

Assumption 69:

 Scott would not use a sane 'clue' to Laci's abduction such as a dried out pot on stove, frozen food melted on counter, wet clothes in washer.

Assumption 70:

 Scott would watch Martha Stewart to create an alibi after killing his wife and with her body in the house for some unknown reason but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 71:

 Scott would tell the police that McKenzie is protective of Laci which negates any 'abduction' alibi but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 72:

 Scott would check his voice mail instead of being very careful while driving to the warehouse with the body in his truck but that was not suspicious.

Assumption 73:

 Amy would state that the pants Laci was found in were not the pants she wore to the hair salon but the prosecutor would claim that they were the same pants although he offered no proof of this but that was not suspicious and the prosecutor is correct and his own witness who actually saw the pants was wrong.

Assumption 74:

 The baby would be able to come out of Laci's womb somehow, even while her pants were still on her body.

Assumption 75:

 Laci would leave grass clippings in her tote bag with a book and with a jacket stuffed in there and not hung up but that was not suspicious although she was a very neat housekeeper.

Assumption 76:

 Scott would describe Laci's clothes incorrectly but that was not suspicious and meant he was guilty although no one could explain how.

Assumption 77:

 Scott would put grass clippings on her black pants and the towel and the leash, but then clean them off the leash for some mysterious reason.

Assumption 78:

 Scott would put the leash on the dog and dump him or let him run free, then take the leash off when he got home and forget to tell the police for some mysterious reason.

Assumption 79:

 Scott would go on the computer in the house for some unknown reason after killing Laci but forget to tell the police about it for some other mysterious reason.

Assumption 80:

 Scott could kill Laci in the house without leaving any evidence anywhere even though she was very pregnant.

Assumption 81:

 Scott could kill Laci in the house without her injuring him.

Assumption 82:

 Scott could pick Laci up and move her out of the house and onto the truck without leaving any evidence anywhere even though she was very pregnant.

Assumption 83:

 Scott would move Laci's body from the house to the truck, to the warehouse, to the boat instead of simply towing the boat to the house and moving her once.

Assumption 84:

 Scott would leave her body sit in the truck or the boat while spending an hour or two on the computer at the warehouse and sending cards and putting together a tool.

Assumption 85:

 Scott would put her body in a boat and tow it down the highway uncovered because the cover cannot be used for towing but that is believable.

Assumption 86:

 Scott would stop on the way at a corner store to buy items while leaving the body out in the boat uncovered in the parking lot but that is believable.

Assumption 87:

 Scott would tie up the boat with the uncovered body in it at the dock and then drive away leaving it behind for several minutes so that anyone could look in it while he parked his truck and walked back to the often used dock but that is believable.

Assumption 88:

 Scott would keep the parking ticket and fishing licence to put him where he was dumping the body but that is believable.

Assumption 89:

 Scott would go there in the middle of the day to dump the body.

Assumption 90:

 Scott would use a boat he had never tried before to dump the body.

Assumption 91:

 Scott would use an outboard he had never tried before to dump the body.

Assumption 92:

 Scott would go to a bay he had never been to before to dump the body.

Assumption 93:

 Scott could get the body plus the weights over the side without swamping the boat which would have already been close to overloaded.

Assumption 94:

 Scott would dump the body in water shallower than his swimming pool.

Assumption 95:

 Scott could leave no trace evidence or cadaver scent at the house although forensic scientists say that is virtually impossible.

Assumption 96:

 Scott could leave no trace evidence or cadaver scent in the truck although forensic scientists say that is virtually impossible.

Assumption 97:

 Scott could leave no trace evidence or cadaver scent at the warehouse although forensic scientists say that is virtually impossible.

Assumption 98:

 Scott could leave no trace evidence or cadaver scent in the boat although forensic scientists say that is virtually impossible.

Assumption 99:

 The body would not be found despite spending $1 million searching for it with the most modern equipment over many, many days but that is believable.

Assumption 100:

 Cadaver dogs would find no trace of Laci anywhere at or near the bay although they are almost infallible at doing this but that is believable.

Assumption 101:

 Laci being found at the bay proves Scott is guilty even though many, many other bodies have been found in the bay.

Assumption 102:

 The baby would separate from the body under water by a mechanism unknown to science (so called 'coffin birth' is almost never seen and requires an intact uterus).

Assumption 103:

 The hole that would let a full sized baby emerge would be still too small to let any harm come to the baby from fish or crabs although it must have formed over a period of time but that is believable.

Assumption 104:

 The extremely delicate baby would be able to exit from the body with no damage by a mechanism unknown to science.

Assumption 105:

 The baby would have twine double knotted around its neck and arm under water by a mechanism unknown to science.

Assumption 106:

 The baby would make it to shore without animal feeding.

Assumption 107:

 The extremely delicate baby would cross over a brutal set of rocks used as a sea wall with no damage.

Assumption 108:

 The extremely delicate baby would make it well up the shore past the high tide mark with no damage.

Assumption 109:

 The mother's body would make a totally different track and no explanation could be offered as to how it got where it was found.

Assumption 110:

 Both bodies would be found separated and in different locations but within 24 hours of each other.

Assumption 111:

 The limbs and head would detach from the body by a mechanism unknown to science.

Assumption 112:

 The 32 lb of weights that the prosecutor claimed were used pulled the arms and legs off the body even though almost any adult can easily lift 32 lb with one arm and it won't come off.

Assumption 113:

 The 32 lb of weights that the prosecutor claimed were used pulled the arms and legs off the body even though some adults can lift their entire body with one arm only and their arm won't come off.

Assumption 114:

 The 32 lb of weights that the prosecutor claimed were used pulled the arms and legs off the body even though it is easy for most adults to lift 8 lb with each arm and each leg at the same time and their limbs won't come off.

Assumption 115:

 The mother's body would be far less deteriorated than expected by past experience given the time in the sea (according to experience and experiments it should have been a skeleton in 20 - 28 days) as a result of factors unknown to science.

Assumption 116:

 The mother's uterus would be 2 or 3 weeks post partum and too small for the baby to have been inside but that is normal in this case as a result of factors unknown to science.

Assumption 117:

 The one hair found in the boat proves Laci's body was in the boat even though the MPD shook Scott's jacket (which Laci wore to walk the dog) out in the boat before finding the hair.

Assumption 118:

 The one hair found in the boat proves Laci's body was in the boat even though the MPD got into the boat after being in Scott and Laci's house and before finding the hair.

Assumption 119:

 The one hair found in the boat proves Laci's body was in the boat even though Laci was at the warehouse when the boat was there.

Assumption 120:

 The one hair found in the boat proves Laci's body was in the boat even though Laci and Scott slept together and used the same laundry equipment.

Assumption 121:

 The one hair found in the boat made it all the way on the trip back to the warehouse even though the boat was towed at highway speed for 90 miles with the wind buffeting everything inside the boat.

Assumption 122:

 The cement mess on the flat bed proved Scott made five weights, not one, even though the 'mess' supposedly fit the pitcher found there which was shown in court to have not been used to make the one weight he had.

Assumption 123:

 The cement mess on the flat bed proved Scott made five weights, not one, even though there was no proof he had any extra re-bar to make handles for the weights.

Assumption 124:

 The cement mess on the flat bed proved Scott made five weights, not one, even though the rest of the cement was found to have been used to patch his driveway.

Assumption 125:

 Scott put the boat cover under a tool which dripped gasoline on it. This proves that he is guilty because the gasoline would destroy any evidence even though the MPD could have seized it before he stored it and although he never objected to them taking whatever they needed.

Assumption 126:

 Scott put the boat cover under a tool which dripped gasoline on it. This proves that he is guilty because the gasoline would destroy any evidence even though no testing was done to see if there was any evidence on it and no competent witness testified that the gasoline would prevent such testing.

Assumption 127:

 The one and only witness, Dr Devore, who said Conner was only 7½ months old, was right even though every other witness said he was a full term baby.

Assumption 128:

 The one witness, Dr Devore, who said Conner was only 7½ months old, was right even though there was no vernix or lanugo nor any other signs of pre-maturity on Conner's body.

Assumption 129:

 The one witness, Dr Devore, who said Conner was only 7½ months old, was right even though P. Jeanty (his own reference), F. Rodesch, D. Delbeke and J. E. Dumont say that his bone measuring method is an unreliable method (Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 3, Issue 2 75-79).

Assumption 130:

 The one witness, Dr Devore, who said Conner was only 7½ months old, was right even though shortened foetal long bones may be indicative of a skeletal dysplasia and will throw off the estimate and that possibility was not disproved.

Assumption 131:

 Conner separated from Laci after both were dead even though there was caffeine in Laci's system but none in Conner's system and despite the fact that caffeine crosses the placenta. This was as a result of factors unknown to science.

Assumption 132:

 Finding Conner's body proves that Scott killed Laci and dumped her body even though there was no evidence Conner was ever in the sea or could have gotten from the sea to where his body was found.

Assumption 133:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her and dumped the body even though the state's own witness, Dr. Cheng, could not explain how it got where it was found from where Scott was.

Assumption 134:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her and dumped the body even though back tracking the tides and currents from where her body was found takes you to the Albany Bulb a day or two before.

Assumption 135:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her and dumped the body in the ocean even though when three floats were separately dropped off the Albany Bulb each went directly to where Laci's body was found (Map from ModBee.com). Note: It is most likely that Laci's body was dumped off the Richmond Jetty.

Assumption 136:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her even though most of the world knew where he was that day and where the police were searching long before the bodies were found.

Assumption 137:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her even though as many as 200 million people had full, free and unfettered access to the places the bodies were found and for four months.

Assumption 138:

 Finding Laci's body at the bay 2 miles from where Scott was boating 4 months previously proves that he killed her; even though the bodies were not found by police but by passers by who obviously were much closer both in time and in space to the bodies than Scott ever was shown to be. Thus since those people could get closer so could someone moving the bodies there, but that can be ignored for some unexplained reason.

Assumption 139:

 Scott selling Laci's car proves he is guilty although she wanted to replace it and he needed to buy a new truck for work after the MPD seized his truck and refused to return it even though no evidence was ever found on it or in it.

Assumption 140:

 Scott wanting to sell his house proves he is guilty although his not wanting his family to continue to live there after the abduction was a reasonable response to the abduction of his wife.

Assumption 141:

 Scott wanting to sell his house proves he is guilty although his not wanting his family to continue to live there after the abduction would be regarded as showing deep concern for his wife and child if anyone else did that.

Assumption 142:

 Scott protecting Laci's car from being damaged by the MPD proves he is guilty although it would seem the reverse was true.

Assumption 143:

 Scott protecting Laci's property such as the table from being damaged by the MPD proves he is guilty although it would seem the reverse was true.

Assumption 144:

 Scott taking care of the house by cleaning the pool and doing other maintenance as Laci would have insisted on proves he is guilty although it would seem the reverse was true.

Assumption 145:

 Scott wanting a list of everything taken by the MPD to show Laci that he was taking care of her stuff proves he is guilty although it would seem the reverse was true.

Assumption 146:

 Scott was planning to escape to Mexico so that must mean he is guilty even though the junk in his car and the big wad of cash he had could have raised suspicions from the guards at the border and created difficulties.

Assumption 147:

 The water purifier proved Scott was going to hide out in Mexico so even though bottled water is available everywhere in Mexico that means he is guilty.

Assumption 148:

 The water purifier proved Scott was going to hide out in Mexico so that means he is guilty even though water purifying tablets are smaller and lighter.

Assumption 149:

 Scott wanted to escape to Mexico and that proves he is guilty even though he had just been to Mexico and had returned as he had planned.

Assumption 150:

 Scott must be guilty even though Laci's cell phone, keys and other personal items were found in the home and not dropped in the park or elsewhere to make it look like an abduction.

Assumption 151:

 Scott must be guilty even though after Frey recorded over 3000 taped calls to him no incriminating statements and no confessions were ever made by him.

Assumption 152:

 Scott must be guilty even though none of the calls taped by the MPD had any incriminating statements and no confessions were ever made by him.

Assumption 153:

 Amber Frey could not have been involved in Laci's abduction even though she had a motive, and had no alibi.

Assumption 154:

 Ron Grantski could not have been involved in Laci's abduction even though he said fishing on that day made Scott look guilty and he himself was fishing on that day, and had no alibi.

Assumption 155:

 No registered sex offender or other parolee or other criminal could have been involved in the crime although 290 registered sex offenders and parolees were let off the hook with just saying, "Oh I was with my mother" or similar during a phone call and with no other verification at all.

Assumption 156:

 No one would have held Laci captive for any reason although in a recent case in Modesto a man was kidnapped and held for ransom by criminals.

Assumption 157:

 No one in California would keep a woman captive for more than a day or two although Cameron Hooker kept Colleen Stan captive as his sex slave for 7 years.

Assumption 158:

 No one in California would keep a woman captive for more than a day or two although Charles Ng and Leonard Lake kidnapped, enslaved, tortured and murdered many people including families (convicted of the murders of six men, three women and two baby boys and the total may have been 25).

Assumption 159:

 Only Scott could have harmed Laci although in California Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono were convicted of kidnapping, raping, torturing and killing ten girls and women ranging in age from twelve to twenty-eight years old during a four-month period.

Assumption 160:

 Laci Peterson couldn't have been kidnapped to steal her baby even though Michelle Bica shot Theresa Andrews to death then performed a crude but successful Caesarean section operation and passed the baby off as her own for five days.

Assumption 161:

 Laci Peterson couldn't have been kidnapped to steal her baby even though Lisa M. Montgomery, 36, of Melvern, Kansas, was arrested and charged with kidnapping resulting in death for the murder of Bobbie Jo Stinnett and for taking her baby in a crude Caesarean operation.

Assumption 162:

 The jury's conviction of Scott Peterson should end all argument as to his guilt; although a jury convicted Scott Hornoff in Warick, Rhode Island, of murdering his girlfriend and the legal system there was very proud of convicting him. He would not be free even today except that the actual killer (yes, it does happen), Todd Barry, confessed his crime and the prosecutors reluctantly had to let Hornoff go free.

Assumption 163:

 The idea that Laci walked in on a burglary and was abducted and murdered is unreasonable - although when a pregnant 29-year-old nurse, daughter and wife, Tamara Cundey Dunstan, walked in on the burglary of her mother's west Augusta home in 2004 she was assaulted and robbed before being strangled to death by the intruder and her body buried.

Assumption 164:

 No one could seriously consider anyone other than Scott as a possible suspect - although Larimer Assistant District Attorney Cliff Riedel said, "The brutal murder of Heather Garraus was because she was faithful. She was faithful to a husband who did nothing but cheat on her.” He said this during the trial of Shawna Nelson, the woman with whom Ignacio Garraus was having an affair and who was charged with the murder of Heather Garraus. It was claimed that Shawna Nelson was obsessed with Ignacio Garraus and murdered his wife to get him for herself.