CONTEMPORARY FLOWER ARRANGING - FLOWER ARRANGING

Contemporary flower arranging - Flower bulbs to plant in spring - Small flower tattoos.

Contemporary Flower Arranging


contemporary flower arranging
    flower arranging
  • Floristry is the general term used to describe the professional floral trade. It encompasses flower care and handling, floral design or flower arranging, merchandising, and display and flower delivery. Wholesale florists sell bulk flowers and related supplies to professionals in the trade.
  • (in  floral decoration: Techniques)
    contemporary
  • a person of nearly the same age as another
  • Living or occurring at the same time
  • Dating from the same time
  • characteristic of the present; "contemporary trends in design"; "the role of computers in modern-day medicine"
  • belonging to the present time; "contemporary leaders"
  • Belonging to or occurring in the present
contemporary flower arranging - First Arrangement,
First Arrangement, Art Poster by Harrison Rucker
First Arrangement, Art Poster by Harrison Rucker
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Flowers, Coventry Cathedral
Flowers, Coventry Cathedral
The Swedish windows are located in the area immediately to the left of the great tapestry by the stairwell leading to the undercroft (and now adays the main visitor route into the cathedral). They were the gift of the people of Sweden and made in the country by artist Einar Forseth (who also designed the mosaic floor of the Chapel of Unity). The theme of the windows is the work of British missionaries in bringing the faith to Scandinavia, represented in the first three figurative windows, whilst the remaining two feature national and christian symbols. The bright colouring and style set them apart from the other, more painterly windows in the Cathedral. Coventry's Cathedral is a unique synthesis of old a new, born of wartime suffering and forged in the spirit of postwar optimism, famous for it's history and for being the most radically modern of Anglican cathedrals. Two cathedral's stand side by side, the ruins of the medieval building, destroyed by incendiary bombs in 1940 and the bold new building designed by Basil Spence and opened in 1962. It is a common misconception that Coventry lost it's first cathedral in the wartime blitz, but the bombs actually destroyed it's second; the original medieval cathedral was the monastic St Mary's, a large cruciform building believed to have been similar in appearance to Lichfield Cathedral (whose diocese it shared). Tragically it became the only English cathedral to be destroyed during the Reformation, after which it was quickly quarried away, leaving only scant fragments, but enough evidence survives to indicate it's rich decoration (some pieces displayed nearby in the Priory Visitors Centre). Foundations of it's apse were found during the building of the new cathedral in the 1950s, thus technically three cathedrals share the same site. The mainly 15th century St Michael's parish church became the seat of the new diocese of Coventry in 1918, and being one of the largest parish churches in the country it was upgraded to cathedral status without structural changes (unlike most 'parish church' cathedrals created in the early 20th century). It lasted in this role a mere 22 years before being burned to the ground in the 1940 Coventry Blitz, leaving only the outer walls and the magnificent tapering tower and spire (the extensive arcades and clerestoreys collapsed completely in the fire, precipitated by the roof reinforcement girders, installed in the Victorian restoration, that buckled in the intense heat). The determination to rebuild the cathedral in some form was born on the day of the bombing, however it wasn't until the mid 1950s that a competition was held and Sir Basil Spence's design was chosen. Spence had been so moved by experiencing the ruined church he resolved to retain it entirely to serve as a forecourt to the new church. He envisaged the two being linked by a glass screen wall so that the old church would be visible from within the new. Built between 1957-62 at a right-angle to the ruins, the new cathedral attracted controversy for it's modern form, and yet some modernists argued that it didn't go far enough, afterall there are echoes of the gothic style in the great stone-mullioned windows of the nave and the net vaulting (actually a free-standing canopy) within. What is exceptional is the way art has been used as such an integral part of the building, a watershed moment, revolutionising the concept of religious art in Britain. Spence employed some of the biggest names in contemporary art to contribute their vision to his; the exterior is adorned with Jacob Epstein's triumphant bronze figures of Archangel Michael (patron of the cathedral) vanquishing the Devil. At the entrance is the remarkable glass wall, engraved by John Hutton with strikingly stylised figures of saints and angels, and allowing the interior of the new to communicate with the ruin. Inside, the great tapestry of Christ in majesty surrounded by the evangelistic creatures, draws the eye beyond the high altar; it was designed by Graham Sutherland and was the largest tapestry ever made. However one of the greatest features of Coventry is it's wealth of modern stained glass, something Spence resolved to include having witnessed the bleakness of Chartres Cathedral in wartime, when all it's stained glass had been removed. The first window encountered on entering is the enormous 'chess-board' baptistry window filled with stunning abstract glass by John Piper & Patrick Reyntiens, a symphony of glowing colour. The staggered nave walls are illuminated by ten narrow floor to ceiling windows filled with semi-abstract symbolic designs arranged in pairs of dominant colours (green, red, multi-coloured, purple/blue and gold) representing the souls journey to maturity, and revealed gradually as one approaches the altar. This amazing project was the work of three designers lead by master glass artist Lawrence Lee of the Royal College of Art along with Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke (each artist
Between Hope and Fear
Between Hope and Fear
In the striking painting called Between Hope and Fear, artist Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema has depicted a scene that evokes life in ancient Greece. And while the image is based on a Nineteenth century interpretation of Greek art and culture, it is interesting to note that Victorian audiences and art critics alike tended to interpret this work based mainly their conservative contemporary perspective. For many critics, Between Hope and Fear represented a touching image of family. They saw the young woman in the foreground as a modest daughter, demurely requesting her father's permission to wed. The young woman holds a bouquet of flowers and shyly lowers her head, and this posture of innocence must have struck some viewers as an ideal attitude to suggest submission. The father, here portrayed as a bearded older man, reclines on a couch with his drinking cup, and he is ostensibly considering his daughter's request. While this interpretation accords well with the strict morality of the Victorian era, it is also likely that it is a bit too simplistic. For critics failed to look too closely at the rich Pompeian red mural in the background. On this mural, Greek figures are arranged in a splendid procession that has distinctly Dionysian overtones. This mural, with its suggestion of the pleasures of the Greek god Dionysos, points to the idea that the man is in fact instead enjoying a symposium (which is essentially an ancient Greek drinking party). Therefore, the young woman would most definitely not be his daughter, but rather a performer who entertained male audiences at symposia.

contemporary flower arranging
contemporary flower arranging
Living Art
Olivier Giugni, the renowned floral artist, presents stunning portraits of his sumptuous creations in a variety of private homes, along with detailed descriptions of their design and placement—and recipes for a dozen of his signature arrangements.Life is color and color is life. This is the mantra of Olivier Giugni, founder and owner of L’Olivier, the sleek floral design atelier in Manhattan. Far from Brignoles, the Provencal village where he grew up, Olivier reimagines the warmth, whimsy, style, and bursts of color from his native France in a singularly contemporary fashion, and in doing so, he has become one of the New York area’s most beloved and acclaimed floral designers.Created from a breathtaking range of organic and sustainable material, Olivier’s work becomes living sculpture, drawing from and reflecting back the signature elements of its surrounding environment. True to this vision, his gorgeous, lush arrangements of dramatic flowers and plants inspire and transform every space they occupy.In Living Art, Olivier walks readers through the homes of eighteen of his clients as well as his own, pointing out how their art, furnishings, and design preferences engage in a call-and-response with his unique arrangements. Along the way, Olivier’s creative thought process is revealed, showing how composition, color, texture, and fragrance can have a subtle yet decisive impact on the energy of a room, enhancing and elevating mood and moment.Living Art’s spectacular images illuminate this master florist’s aesthetic approach in an accessible way. A gift for experienced arrangers or novices just learning to work with flowers, the book includes recipes for twelve of Olivier’s unique arrangements, offering novel ways to style flowers, plants, and foliage—from cascade to orchid garden to bouquet. The poetic, playful creativity featured in Living Art will move and spark the imagination of all those who are passionate about flowers.

Olivier Giugni, the renowned floral artist, presents stunning portraits of his sumptuous creations in a variety of private homes, along with detailed descriptions of their design and placement—and recipes for a dozen of his signature arrangements.Life is color and color is life. This is the mantra of Olivier Giugni, founder and owner of L’Olivier, the sleek floral design atelier in Manhattan. Far from Brignoles, the Provencal village where he grew up, Olivier reimagines the warmth, whimsy, style, and bursts of color from his native France in a singularly contemporary fashion, and in doing so, he has become one of the New York area’s most beloved and acclaimed floral designers.Created from a breathtaking range of organic and sustainable material, Olivier’s work becomes living sculpture, drawing from and reflecting back the signature elements of its surrounding environment. True to this vision, his gorgeous, lush arrangements of dramatic flowers and plants inspire and transform every space they occupy.In Living Art, Olivier walks readers through the homes of eighteen of his clients as well as his own, pointing out how their art, furnishings, and design preferences engage in a call-and-response with his unique arrangements. Along the way, Olivier’s creative thought process is revealed, showing how composition, color, texture, and fragrance can have a subtle yet decisive impact on the energy of a room, enhancing and elevating mood and moment.Living Art’s spectacular images illuminate this master florist’s aesthetic approach in an accessible way. A gift for experienced arrangers or novices just learning to work with flowers, the book includes recipes for twelve of Olivier’s unique arrangements, offering novel ways to style flowers, plants, and foliage—from cascade to orchid garden to bouquet. The poetic, playful creativity featured in Living Art will move and spark the imagination of all those who are passionate about flowers.

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