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Flying Through the Air With V

Fly Through the Air With V

Emergent Literacy Design

Anna Dilworth

 

Rationale:

This lesson plan will help children identify /v/, the phoneme represented by v. Through the implementation of this lesson, students will learn to recognize /v/ in spoken words by learning a meaningful representation (a plane flying through the air) and the letter symbol v, practice writing the letter symbol v, practice distinguishing /v/ in different words, listening to a story being read with /v/ being the repeated sound, and applying phoneme awareness during the phonetic cue activity with /v/.

 

Materials:

Primary paper and pencil; regular paper; large piece of poster board with “Vincent the vampire visited Victor Von Viking the vegetarian in the Valley” written out on it; crayons; Victor the Vulture story (page 23) [link to story listed at the bottom of the page]; word cards with VASE, MINE, VAIL, and TOWEL; assessment worksheet focusing on identifying /v/ [link to assessment listed at the bottom of the page]

 

Procedures:

1.    State: Today, we are going to be exploring and learning about our written language and how our mouth moves as we make each letter sound that combines to make words. It is extremely important for us to learn about the variety of different letters in our alphabet because the more letters we know, the easier it will be to recognize and read words. Right now, we are going to focus on how the mouth moves when we say /v/. The sound /v/ is spelled with the letter V. We can remember the sound the letter V makes because the letter V looks like the tip of an airplane diving downwards, which makes the /v/ sound.

2.    Let’s pretend we are airplanes. Stick your hands out to the side and say /v/, /v/, /v/ [Model arms like the wings of a plane as you say /v/]. Do you feel the shape your mouth is in when we say /v/? When we say /v/, we place our top front teeth against our bottom lip and make a vibrating noise by vibrating our vocal chords.

3.    I want you to pay very close attention right now. I am going to show you how we can find the /v/ in the word leave. I will make sure to stretch out the word as much as I can so that we can both hear /v/. Are you ready to listen? Here we go. Lllll-e-e-ea-ea-ea-vvv-e. I heard it! Did you? As soon as I said /v/ I felt my top front teeth touch my bottom lip and I felt my vocal chords vibrating.

4.    Now, let’s try this tongue twister that I wrote out on this sheet of paper. I am going to say it to you first regularly reading it and then I will say it again, stretching out every /v/ in the sentence. After I have done this, I want everyone to say it together with me. Listen closely, “Vincent the vampire visited Victor Von Viking the vegetarian in the Valley”. Ok, now I will say it very slowly, “Vvvincent the vvvampire vvvisited Vvvictor Vvvon Vvviking the vvvegetarian in the Vvvalley”. Now let us all try it together, “Vvvincent the vvvampire vvvisited Vvvictor Vvvon Vvviking the vvvegetarian in the Vvvalley”.

5.    [This will be the time of this lesson that all students will need a piece of primary paper and a pencil]. Ok everyone, we are going to see how we use V to spell /v/. Remember, the letter V looks like the tip of an airplane diving downwards. Let’s practice writing the lowercase letter v first. Start at the fence, slant down to the sidewalk and slant back up to the fence. I want everyone to try to make five lowercase v’s as I come walk around to check. Great job! Now the great thing about the letter V is that the uppercase letter V is exactly the same shape as the lowercase letter v but bigger. So now, to write our uppercase V, we are going to start at the rooftop, slant down to the sidewalk and slant back up to the rooftop. Everyone try five uppercase letter V’s now.

6.    Have students repeat pairs of words after you and write down on a sheet of paper the word that they think contains /v/. Once all pairs have been stated, call on students to share their answers. Prompt: Say good, say evil. Do you hear /v/ in good or evil? Now say five; say two. Do you hear /v/ in five or two? Now say movie; say play. Do you hear /v/ in movie or play? For this next activity, I want everyone to stick out their airplane wings when you hear /v/ in a list of words I am about to say. Is everyone ready? Here we go. Love, and, the, cow, favorite, vacuum, shampoo, egg, plant, vegetable, lava, vowels, consonants.

7.    Say: I am going to read you a very short story about an animal whose name starts with /v/. Can anyone guess what this animal’s name might be if is starts with /v/? Well, his name is Victor and he is a vulture, which is a type of bird. Victor was not a very friendly type of bird and he did not have many friends. But one day, Victor goes into the village for a dance and spots another vulture that he likes named Vanessa. Do you think Victor will talk to him? Or will he be too nervous? Let’s read to find out. [Read Victor the Vulture; p. 23]. Then have students pick out their favorite part of the story and draw it on a piece of paper.

8.    Use phonetic cue cards to test students’ phonemic awareness. Model first with the card VOW. Look at the card and say is this vow or wow? When I look at the first letter of the word, I see the airplane diving downwards, so this word must be v-v-v-v-ow, vow. Now you try. VASE: vase or base? MINE: mine or vine? VEIL: veil or mail? TOWEL: towel or vowel?

9.    To assess students’ understanding of /v/, pass out assessment worksheet. Students will need to color in every picture that begins with the letter V and complete the partial spelling. This worksheet will allow you to assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the lesson that has just been taught.

 

Reference: 

Murray, Bruce. Gaining Alphabetic Insight:  Is Phoneme Manipulation Skill or Identity Knowledge Causal? http://www.auburn.edu/academic/education/reading_genie/insight.html

 Victor the Vulture story: Du Plessis Basset, Les. http://www.scribd.com/doc/60789827/Letter-Songs-in-Word

 Assessment worksheet: http://www.kidzone.ws/kindergarten/v-begins2.htm

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